List of people associated with PARC

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Many notable computer scientists and others have been associated with PARC (Palo Alto Research Center Incorporated, formerly Xerox PARC). They include:

  • Nina Amenta (at PARC 1996–1997),[1] researcher in computational geometry and computer graphics
  • Anne Balsamo (at PARC 1999–2002),[2] media studies scholar of connections between art, culture, gender, and technology
  • Patrick Baudisch (at PARC 2000–2001),[3] , in human–computer interaction
  • Daniel G. Bobrow (at PARC 1972– 2017),[4] artificial intelligence researcher
  • Susanne Bødker (at PARC 1982–1983),[5] researcher in human–computer interaction
  • David Boggs (at PARC 1972–1982),[6] computer network pioneer, coinventor of Ethernet
  • Anita Borg (at PARC 1997–2003),[7] computer systems researcher, advocate for women in computing
  • John Seely Brown (at PARC 1978–2000),[8] researcher in organizational studies, chief scientist of Xerox
  • Bill Buxton (at PARC 1989–1994),[9] pioneer in human–computer interaction
  • Stuart Card (at PARC 1974-2010),[10] applied human factors in human–computer interaction
  • Robert Carr (at PARC in late 1970s),[11] CAD and office software designer
  • Ed Chi (at PARC 1997–2011),[12] researcher in information visualization and the usability of web sites
  • Elizabeth F. Churchill (at PARC 2004–2006),[13] specialist in human-computer interaction and social computing
  • Lynn Conway (at PARC 1973–1982),[14] VLSI design pioneer and transgender activist
  • Franklin C. Crow (at PARC circa 1982–1990), computer graphics expert who did early research in antialiasing
  • Pavel Curtis (at PARC 1983–1996),[15] pioneer in text-based online virtual reality systems
  • Doug Cutting (at PARC 1990-1994),[citation needed] creator of Nutch, Lucene, and Hadoop
  • Steve Deering (at PARC circa 1990–1996),[citation needed] internet engineer, lead designer of IPv6
  • L Peter Deutsch (at PARC 1971–1986),[16] implementor of LISP 1.5, Smalltalk, and Ghostscript
  • David DiFrancesco (at PARC 1972–1974),[citation needed] worked with Richard Shoup on PAINT, co-founder of Pixar
  • Paul Dourish (at PARC mid-1990s),[17] researcher at the intersection of computer science and social science
  • Jerome I. Elkind (at PARC 1971–1978),[18] head of the Computer Science Laboratory at PARC
  • Clarence Ellis (at PARC 1976–1984),[19] first African-American CS PhD, pioneer of computer-supported cooperative work
  • David Em (at PARC 1975),[20] computer artist, first fine artist to create a computer model of a 3d character
  • Bill English (at PARC 1971–1989),[21] co-inventor of the computer mouse
  • David Eppstein (at PARC 1989–1990),[22] researcher in computational geometry and graph algorithms
  • John Ellenby (at PARC 1975–1978),[citation needed] Led AltoII development, 1979 founded GRID Systems
  • Matthew K. Franklin (at PARC 1998–2000),[23] developed pairing-based elliptic-curve cryptography
  • Gaetano Borriello (at PARC 1980–1987),[24] developer of the Open Data Kit
  • Sean R. Garner (at PARC circa 2009– ), researcher in photovoltaics and sustainable engineering
  • Charles Geschke (at PARC 1972–1980),[25] invented page description languages, co-founded Adobe
  • Adele Goldberg (at PARC 1973–1986),[26] designer of Smalltalk and president of ACM
  • Jack Goldman, chief scientist of Xerox 1968–1982 and (in 1970) founder of PARC[27]
  • Bill Gosper (at PARC 1977–1981),[28] founder of the hacker community, pioneer of symbolic computation
  • Rich Gossweiler (at PARC 1997–2000),[29] software engineer, expert in interaction design
  • Rebecca Grinter (at PARC 2000–2004),[30] researcher in human-computer interaction and computer-supported cooperative work
  • Neil Gunther (at PARC 1982–1990),[31] developer of open-source performance modeling software
  • Marti Hearst (at PARC 1994–1997),[32] expert in computational linguistics and search engine user interfaces
  • Jeffrey Heer (at PARC 2001-2005),[33] expert in information visualization and interactive data analysis
  • Bruce Horn (at PARC 1973–1981),[34] member of the original Apple Macintosh design team
  • Bernardo Huberman (at PARC circa 1982–2000), applied chaos theory to web dynamics
  • Dan Ingalls (at PARC circa 1972–1984), implemented Smalltalk virtual machine, invented bit blit
  • Van Jacobson (at PARC 2006– ),[35] developed internet congestion control protocols and diagnostics
  • Natalie Jeremijenko (at PARC 1995),[36] installation artist
  • Ronald Kaplan (at PARC 1974–2007),[37][38] expert in natural language processing, helped develop Interlisp
  • Jussi Karlgren (at PARC 1991-1992),[39] known for work on stylistics, evaluation of search technology, and statistical semantics
  • Lauri Karttunen (at PARC 1987–2011),[40] developed finite state morphology in computational linguistics
  • Alan Kay (at PARC 1971–1981),[41] pioneer of object-oriented programming and graphical user interfaces
  • Martin Kay (at PARC 1974– ),[37] expert on machine translation and computational linguistics
  • Gregor Kiczales (at PARC 1984–2002),[42] invented aspect-oriented programming
  • Ralph Kimball (at PARC 1972–1982),[43] designed first commercial workstation with mice, icons, and windows
  • Butler Lampson (at PARC 1971–1983),[44] won Turing Award for his development of networked personal computers
  • David M. Levy (at PARC 1984–1999),[45] researcher on information overload
  • Cristina Lopes (at PARC 1995–2002),[46] researcher in aspect-oriented programming and ubiquitous computing
  • Richard Francis Lyon (at PARC 1977–1981),[47] built the first optical mouse
  • Jock D. Mackinlay (at PARC 1986–2004)[48] researcher in information visualization
  • Cathy Marshall (at PARC circa 1989–2000), researcher on hypertext and personal archiving
  • Edward M. McCreight (at PARC 1971–1989)[49] co-invented B-trees
  • Ralph Merkle (at PARC 1988–1999),[50] invented public key cryptography and cryptographic hashing
  • Diana Merry (at PARC circa 1971–1986), helped develop Smalltalk, co-invented bit blit
  • Robert Metcalfe (at PARC 1972–1979),[51] co-invented Ethernet, formulated Metcalfe's Law
  • Jim Mitchell (at PARC 1971–1984),[52] developed WATFOR and ARM RISC chip
  • Louis Monier (at PARC 1983–1989),[53] founder of AltaVista search engine
  • Thomas P. Moran (at PARC 1974–2001),[54] founded journal Human-Computer Interaction
  • James H. Morris (at PARC 1974–1982),[55] co-invented KMP string matching algorithm and lazy evaluation
  • Elizabeth Mynatt (at PARC 1995–1998),[56] studied digital family portraits and ubiquitous computing
  • Martin Newell (at PARC 1979–1981),[57] graphics expert who created the Utah teapot
  • William Newman (at PARC 1973–1979),[58] Graphics and HCI researcher, developed drawing and page description software
  • Geoffrey Nunberg (at PARC 1987–2001),[59] linguist known for his work on lexical semantics
  • Severo Ornstein (at PARC 1976–1983),[60] founding head of Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility
  • Valeria de Paiva (at PARC 2000–2008),[61] uses logic and category theory to model natural language
  • George Pake (at PARC 1970–1986),[62] pioneer in nuclear magnetic resonance, founding director of PARC
  • Jan O. Pedersen (at PARC circa 1990-1996),[citation needed] researcher in search system technology and algorithms
  • Peter Pirolli (at PARC 1991– ),[63] developed information foraging theory
  • Calvin Quate (at PARC 1983–1994),[64] invented the atomic force microscope
  • Ashwin Ram (at PARC circa 2011– ), researcher on artificial intelligence for health applications
  • Prasad Ram (at PARC circa 1998–2000), expert on digital rights management and web search
  • Trygve Reenskaug (at PARC 1978–1979),[65] formulated model-view-controller user interface design
  • George G. Robertson (at PARC circa 1988–1995), information visualization expert
  • Eric Schmidt (at PARC 1982–1983),[66] CEO of Google and chairman of Alphabet
  • Ronald V. Schmidt (at PARC 1980–1985),[67] computer network engineer who founded SynOptics
  • Michael Schroeder (at PARC circa 1977–1985), co-invented the Needham–Schroeder protocol for encrypted networking
  • Bertrand Serlet (at PARC 1985–1989),[68] led the Mac OS X team
  • Scott Shenker (at PARC 1984–1998),[69] leader in software-defined networking
  • John Shoch (at PARC 1971–1980),[70] developed an important predecessor of TCP/IP networking
  • Richard Shoup (at PARC 1971–1978),[citation needed] invented SUPERPAINT and the first 8 bit Frame Buffer (picture memory), 1979 co-founded Aurora
  • Charles Simonyi (at PARC 1972-1981),[71] led the creation of Microsoft Office
  • Alvy Ray Smith (at PARC 1974),[72] cofounded Pixar
  • Brian Cantwell Smith (at PARC 1982–1996),[73] invented introspective programming and researches computational metaphors
  • David Canfield Smith (at PARC 1975),[74] invented computer icons
  • Robert Spinrad (at PARC 1978–1982),[75] designed vacuum tube computers, directed PARC
  • Bob Sproull (at PARC 1973–1977),[76] designed early head-mounted display, wrote widely used computer graphics textbook
  • Gary Starkweather (at PARC 1970–1988),[77] invented laser printers and color management
  • Maureen C. Stone (at PARC circa 1980–1998), expert in color modeling
  • Lucy Suchman (at PARC 1980–2000),[78] researcher on human factors, cybercultural anthropology, and feminist theory
  • Bert Sutherland (at PARC 1975–1981),[79] brought social scientists to PARC
  • Robert Taylor (at PARC 1970–1983),[80] managed early ARPAnet development, founded DEC Systems Research Center
  • Warren Teitelman (at PARC 1972–1984),[81] designed Interlisp
  • Shang-Hua Teng (at PARC 1991–1992),[82] invented smoothed analysis of algorithms and near-linear-time Laplacian solvers
  • Larry Tesler (at PARC 1973–1980),[83] developed Object Pascal and Apple Newton
  • Chuck Thacker (at PARC 1971–1983),[84] chief designer of Alto, co-invented Ethernet
  • John Warnock (at PARC 1978–1982),[85] co-founded Adobe
  • Mark Weiser (at PARC 1987–1999),[86] invented ubiquitous computing
  • Niklaus Wirth (at PARC 1976–1977 and 1984–1985),[87] designed Pascal and other programming languages
  • Frances Yao (at PARC 1979–1999),[88] researcher in computational geometry and combinatorial algorithms
  • Annie Zaenen (at PARC 2001–2011),[89] researcher on linguistic encoding of temporal and spatial information
  • Lixia Zhang (at PARC 1989–1996),[90] computer networking pioneer

References[edit]

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