Makonde language

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Makonde
Chi(ni)makonde
Native to Tanzania, Malawi, Kenya
Ethnicity Makonde
Native speakers
1.4 million (2006)[2]
Dialects
  • Matembwe–Machinga
  • Mabiha
  • Ndonde Hamba (Mawanda)
Latin
Language codes
ISO 639-3 Variously:
kde – Makonde, Mabiha
mvw – Machinga
njd – Ndonde Hamba[1]
Glottolog mako1251  (Makonde)[3]
mach1265  (Machinga)[4]
P.23,24,25[5]

Makonde, or Kimakonde, is the language spoken by the Makonde, an ethnic group in southeast Tanzania and northern Mozambique. Makonde is a central Bantu language closely related to Yao. The Matembwe and Mabiha (Maviha) dialects are divergent, and may not be Makonde (Nurse 2003).

Chikungunya, the name of a mosquito-borne viral fever, is derived from the Makonde root verb kungunyala (meaning "that which bends up", "to become contorted," or "to walk bent over") after the disease was first identified on the Makonde Plateau (de).[6] The derivation of the term is generally falsely attributed to Swahili.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hammarström (2015) Ethnologue 16/17/18th editions: a comprehensive review: online appendices
  2. ^ Makonde, Mabiha at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
    Machinga at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
    Ndonde Hamba[1]
    at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  3. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin; Bank, Sebastian, eds. (2016). "Makonde". Glottolog 2.7. Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. 
  4. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin; Bank, Sebastian, eds. (2016). "Machinga". Glottolog 2.7. Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. 
  5. ^ Jouni Filip Maho, 2009. New Updated Guthrie List Online
  6. ^ Morens DM and Fauci AS. "Chikungunya at the Door — Déjà Vu All Over Again?". New England Journal of Medicine. 371: 885–887. doi:10.1056/NEJMp1408509. 
  7. ^ Singh, SS; Manimunda, SP; Sugunan, AP; Sahina, Vijayachari P. "Four cases of acute flaccid paralysis associated with chikungunya virus infection". Epidemiol Infect. 136: 1277–80. PMC 2870928Freely accessible. PMID 18634716. doi:10.1017/S0950268807009739.