Nirodha

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In Buddhism, Nirodha, "cessation"[1] refers to a state of cessation of Sañña (perception) and Vedanā (feeling). When a practitioner who is entering such an attainment does not think: ‘I will enter the cessation of perception and feeling’ or ‘I am entering the cessation of perception and feeling’ or ‘I have entered the cessation of perception and feeling.’ Rather, their mind has been previously developed so as to lead to such a state. When entering Nirodha, Verbal Sankhara (constructions/formations) cease first, then physical, then mental. A practitioner who is emerging from such an attainment does not think: ‘I will emerge from the cessation of perception and feeling’ or ‘I am emerging from the cessation of perception and feeling’ or ‘I have emerged from the cessation of perception and feeling.’ Rather, their mind has been previously developed so as to lead to such a state. When emerging from Nirodha Mental Sankhara(constructions/formations) arise first, then physical, then verbal. While emerging they experience three kinds of contact: emptiness, signless, and undirected contacts. After emerging their mind slants, slopes, and inclines to seclusion.[2]

Nibbana follows after Nirodha as practitioner sees links of dependent origination with wisdom. Not all Nirodha can lead to Nibbana. Anagami can enter into state of Nirodha at will, with pre determination.

According to Thubten Chodron, Nirodha is the final disappearance of all bad experiences and their causes in such a way that they can no longer occur again.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Buswell & Lopez 2013.
  2. ^ "SuttaCentral". SuttaCentral. Retrieved 2021-01-18.
  3. ^ Thubten Chodron. Articles & Transcripts of Teachings on Lamrim: The Gradual Path to Enlightenment. Dharma Friendship Foundation. (The Twelve Links, part 2 of 5)

Sources[edit]

  • Ajahn Sumedho (2002), The Four Noble Truths, Amaravati Publications
  • Buswell, R.E.; Lopez, D.S. (2013). "nirodha". The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism. Princeton University Press. p. 588. ISBN 978-1-4008-4805-8.