Organization of the New York City Police Department

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An NYPD boat patrols New York Harbor
NYPD officers patrol on scooters

The New York City Police Department (NYPD) is structured into numerous bureaus and units. As a whole, the NYPD is headed by the Police Commissioner, a civilian administrator appointed by the Mayor, with the senior sworn uniformed officer of the service titled "Chief of Department". The Police Commissioner appoints a number of Deputy and Assistant Commissioners. The Department is divided into twenty bureaus, six of which are enforcement bureaus. Each enforcement bureau is further sub-divided into sections, divisions, and units, and into patrol boroughs, precincts, and detective squads. Each Bureau is commanded by a Bureau Chief (such as the Chief of Patrol and the Chief of Housing). There are also a number of specialized units (such as the Technical Assistance Response Unit) that are not part of any of the Bureaus and report to the Chief of the Department.

Leadership[edit]

NYPD Police Headquarters at One Police Plaza.

The Department is headed by and under the control of a civilian Police Commissioner, who is appointed by the Mayor of New York City. The current Police Commissioner is James P. O'Neill.

The Department's executive staff is divided into two areas: civilian and uniformed. The civilian staff are responsible for support services and departmental management, while uniformed officers investigate crimes and conduct law enforcement operations.

  • The First Deputy Commissioner, who is the Department's second-in-command, oversees the civilian Deputy Commissioners and is the Department's chief administrative officer. The current First Deputy Commissioner is Benjamin B. Tucker.[1]
  • The Chief of the Department supervises uniformed police commanders. The chief is the Department's highest ranking uniformed police officer and the lead official responsible for operations. The current chief is Terence Monahan.[2]

Office of the Police Commissioner[edit]

  • Commissioner
  • Chief of Staff
    • First Deputy Commissioner
      • Deputy Commissioner, Administration
      • Deputy Commissioner, Collaborative Policing
      • Deputy Commissioner, Counsel to Police Commissioner
      • Deputy Commissioner, Department Advocate
      • Deputy Commissioner, Equity & Inclusion
      • Deputy Commissioner, Information Technology
      • Deputy Commissioner, Intelligence & Counterterrorism
      • Deputy Commissioner, Internal Affairs
      • Deputy Commissioner, Labor Relations
      • Deputy Commissioner, Legal Matters
      • Deputy Commissioner, Management and Budget
      • Deputy Commissioner, Public Information
      • Deputy Commissioner, Strategic Communications
      • Deputy Commissioner, Support Services
      • Deputy Commissioner, Trials

Office of the Chief of Department[edit]

  • Chief of Department
    • Chief, Community Affairs Bureau
    • Chief, Counterterrorism Bureau
    • Chief, Crime Control Strategies
    • Chief, Detective Bureau
    • Chief, Housing Bureau
    • Chief, Intelligence Bureau
    • Chief, Patrol Services Bureau
    • Chief, Personnel Bureau
    • Chief, Special Operations
    • Chief, Strategic Initiatives
    • Chief, Training
    • Chief, Transit Bureau
    • Chief, Transportation Bureau
    • Supervising Chief Surgeon

Structure[edit]

The following is the Department's hierarchy (with rank insignia): As of June, 2018:[3]

  • Mayor of the City of New York - Bill de Blasio
  • Police Commissioner of the City of New York – James P. O'Neill5 Gold Stars.svg
    • Chief of Staff – Raymond Spinella 3 Gold Stars.svg
  • First Deputy Commissioner – Benjamin B. Tucker 4 Gold Stars.svg
      • Commanding Officer of First Deputy Commissioner's Office Assistant Chief Mathew V. Pontillo 2 Gold Stars.svg
      • Deputy Commissioner, Administration – Robert L. Ganley 3 Gold Stars.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Ceremonial Unit - Lieutenant Tony Giorgio US-O1 insignia.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Chaplains Unit - Lieutenant Steven A. Jerome US-O1 insignia.svg
      • Deputy Commissioner, Collaborative Policing – Susan A. Herman 3 Gold Stars.svg
      • Deputy Commissioner, Counsel to Police Commissioner – Jeff Schlanger 3 Gold Stars.svg
      • Deputy Commissioner, Department Advocate – Kevin S. Richardson 3 Gold Stars.svg
      • Deputy Commissioner, Equity and Inclusion – Tracie Keesee 3 Gold Stars.svg
      • Deputy Commissioner, Information Technology – Jessica S. Tisch 3 Gold Stars.svg
      • Deputy Commissioner, Intelligence & Counterterrorism – John Miller3 Gold Stars.svg
      • Deputy Commissioner, Internal Affairs – Joseph J. Reznick 3 Gold Stars.svg
      • Deputy Commissioner, Labor Relations – John P. Beirne 3 Gold Stars.svg
      • Deputy Commissioner, Legal Matters – Lawrence Byrne 3 Gold Stars.svg
      • Deputy Commissioner, Management and Budget – Vincent D. Grippo 3 Gold Stars.svg
      • Deputy Commissioner, Public Information – Phillip Walzak 3 Gold Stars.svg
      • Deputy Commissioner, Strategic Communications – William W. Andrews 3 Gold Stars.svg
      • Deputy Commissioner, Support Services Bureau – Robert S. Martinez 3 Gold Stars.svg
      • Deputy Commissioner, Trials – Rosemarie Maldonado 3 Gold Stars.svg
    • Chief of Department – Terence Monahan4 Gold Stars.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Operations, Chief of Department's Office - Deputy Chief Edward Mullane 1 Gold Star.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Domestic Violence Unit - Deputy Chief Martin Morales 1 Gold Star.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Technical Assistance Response Unit (TARU) – Inspector Gregory AntonsenColonel Gold-vector.svg
      • Chief of Community Affairs – Bureau Chief Nilda Irizarry Hofmann 3 Gold Stars.svg
        • Executive Officer of Community Affairs - Assistant Chief Kim Royster 2 Gold Stars.svg
        • Commanding Officer of School Safety Division – Assistant Chief Brian J. Conroy 2 Gold Stars.svg
      • Chief of Counterterrorism – Bureau Chief James R. Waters 3 Gold Stars.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Critical Response Command - Deputy Chief Scott Shanley 1 Gold Star.svg
      • Chief of Crime Control Strategies - Bureau Chief Lori Pollock 3 Gold Stars.svg
      • Chief of Detectives – Bureau Chief Dermot F. Shea 3 Gold Stars.svg
        • Executive Officer, Detective Bureau - Deputy Chief Michael Baldassano 1 Gold Star.svg
          • Commanding Officer of Real Time Crime Center – Deputy Inspector Kevin Godek US-O4 insignia.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Brooklyn South Detectives - Assistant Chief Brain Conroy 2 Gold Stars.svg
        • Commanding Officer Brooklyn North Detectives - Deputy Chief Michael Kemper 1 Gold Star.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Manhattan South Detectives - Assistant Chief Patrick Aubry 2 Gold Stars.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Bronx Detectives - Assistant Chief Jason Wilcox 2 Gold Stars.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Narcotics Division – Assistant Chief Brian McCarthy 2 Gold Stars.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Special Victims Division - Deputy Chief Michael Osgood 1 Gold Star.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Crime Scene Unit - Captain Steven W. King Captain insignia gold.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Bomb Squad - Lieutenant Mark Torre US-O1 insignia.svg
      • Chief of Housing – Bureau Chief James A. Secreto 3 Gold Stars.svg
      • Chief of Intelligence – Bureau Chief Thomas P. Galati 3 Gold Stars.svg
      • Chief of Patrol – Bureau Chief Rodney K. Harrison 3 Gold Stars.svg
        • Executive Officer, Patrol Services Bureau - Assistant Chief Fausto Pichardo 2 Gold Stars.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Patrol Borough Manhattan South – Assistant Chief Stephen Hughes 2 Gold Stars.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Patrol Borough Manhattan North – Assistant Chief Kathleen M. O'Reilly 2 Gold Stars.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Patrol Borough Brooklyn North – Assistant Chief Jeffrey Maddrey 2 Gold Stars.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Patrol Borough Brooklyn South – Assistant Chief Steven M. Powers 2 Gold Stars.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Patrol Borough Queens North – Assistant Chief Juanita Holmes 2 Gold Stars.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Patrol Borough Queens South – Assistant Chief David Barrere 2 Gold Stars.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Patrol Borough Bronx – Assistant Chief Lawrence W. Nikunen 2 Gold Stars.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Patrol Borough Staten Island – Assistant Chief Kenneth Corey 2 Gold Stars.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Auxiliary Police Section – Inspector Phylis S. Byrne Colonel Gold-vector.svg
      • Chief of Personnel - Bureau Chief William Morris 3 Gold Stars.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Candidate Assessment Division -
        • Commanding Officer of Personnel Orders Division - Inspector John Benoit Colonel Gold-vector.svg
      • Chief of Special Operations - Bureau Chief Harry Wedin 3 Gold Stars.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Strategic Response Group - Inspector John J. D'Adamo Colonel Gold-vector.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Emergency Services Unit – Deputy Chief Vincent Giordano 1 Gold Star.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Harbor Unit and SCUBA Team –
        • Commanding Officer of Mounted Unit – Deputy Inspector Barry Gelbman US-O4 insignia.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Aviation Unit – Deputy Inspector James Coan US-O4 insignia.svg
      • Chief of Strategic Initiatives - Bureau Chief John Donohue 3 Gold Stars.svg
      • Chief of Training - Theresa Shortell 3 Gold Stars.svg
        • Executive Officer of Training - Assistant Chief James W. Murtagh 2 Gold Stars.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Police Academy - Deputy Chief Raymond Caroli 1 Gold Star.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Recruit Training Section - Inspector Richard J. Dee Colonel Gold-vector.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Police Cadet Corps - Inspector Michael McGrath Colonel Gold-vector.svg
      • Chief of Transit – Bureau Chief Edward Delatorre 3 Gold Stars.svg
        • Executive Officer, Transit Bureau - Assistant Chief Gerald E. Dieckmann 2 Gold Stars.svg
      • Chief of Transportation – Bureau Chief Thomas M. Chan 3 Gold Stars.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Highway Patrol – Inspector Steven D'Ulisse Colonel Gold-vector.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Traffic Enforcement District - Deputy Chief Michael Pilecki 1 Gold Star.svg
        • Commanding Officer of Traffic Operations District - Inspector Scott Hanover Colonel Gold-vector.svg

Patrol Services Bureau[edit]

  • Commanding Officer of Patrol Services – Bureau Chief Rodney Harrison 3 Gold Stars.svg
    • Executive Officer of Patrol Services - Assistant Chief Fausto Pichardo 2 Gold Stars.svg

Overview[edit]

The Patrol Services Bureau is one of the most visible units of the NYPD. The Bureau plans, directs, and coordinates the Department's uniformed officers in law enforcement patrol operations. Under the Chief of Patrol, there are eight Borough Commands, each headed by an Assistant Chief. While each of the boroughs has at least one Patrol Borough Command, the boroughs of Manhattan, Queens and Brooklyn have two commands due to their sizes. The Borough Commands exercise authority over the various seventy-seven Police Precincts.

  • Patrol Borough Chiefs:
    • Commanding Officer of Patrol Borough Manhattan South – Assistant Chief Stephen Hughes 2 Gold Stars.svg
    • Commanding Officer of Patrol Borough Manhattan North – Assistant Chief Kathleen M. O'Reilly 2 Gold Stars.svg
    • Commanding Officer of Patrol Borough Brooklyn North – Assistant Chief Jeffrey Maddrey 2 Gold Stars.svg
    • Commanding Officer of Patrol Borough Brooklyn South – Assistant Chief Steven M. Powers 2 Gold Stars.svg
    • Commanding Officer of Patrol Borough Queens North – Assistant Chief Juanita Holmes2 Gold Stars.svg
    • Commanding Officer of Patrol Borough Queens South – Assistant Chief David Barrere 2 Gold Stars.svg
    • Commanding Officer of Patrol Borough Bronx – Assistant Chief Larry W. Nikunen 2 Gold Stars.svg
    • Commanding Officer of Patrol Borough Staten Island – Assistant Chief Kenneth Corey 2 Gold Stars.svg

Police precincts[edit]

Each patrol borough is composed of precincts. Each precinct is responsible for safety and law enforcement within a designated geographic area. Police units based in these precincts patrol and respond to emergencies.

Manhattan South Manhattan North The Bronx Brooklyn South Brooklyn North Queens South Queens North Staten Island
1st Precinct[4]
19th Precinct[5]
40th Precinct[6]
60th Precinct[7]
73rd Precinct[8]
100th Precinct[9]
104th Precinct[10]
120th Precinct[11]
5th Precinct[12]
20th Precinct[13]
41st Precinct[14]
61st Precinct[15]
75th Precinct[16]
101st Precinct[17]
108th Precinct[18]
121st Precinct[19]
6th Precinct[20]
Central Park (22nd) Precinct[21]
42nd Precinct[22]
62nd Precinct[23]
77th Precinct[24]
102nd Precinct[25]
109th Precinct[26]
122nd Precinct[27]
7th Precinct[28]
23rd Precinct[29]
43rd Precinct[30]
63rd Precinct[31]
79th Precinct[32]
103rd Precinct[33]
110th Precinct[34]
123rd Precinct[35]
9th Precinct[36]
24th Precinct[37]
44th Precinct[38]
66th Precinct[39]
81st Precinct[40]
105th Precinct[41]
111th Precinct[42]
10th Precinct[43]
25th Precinct[44]
45th Precinct[45]
67th Precinct[46]
83rd Precinct[47]
106th Precinct[48]
112th Precinct[49]
13th Precinct[50]
26th Precinct[51]
46th Precinct[52]
68th Precinct[53]
84th Precinct[54]
107th Precinct[55]
114th Precinct[56]
Midtown South (14th) Precinct[57]
28th Precinct[58]
47th Precinct[59]
69th Precinct[60]
88th Precinct[61]
113th Precinct[62]
115th Precinct[63]
17th Precinct[64]
30th Precinct[65]
48th Precinct[66]
70th Precinct[67]
90th Precinct[68]
Midtown North (18th) Precinct[69]
32nd Precinct[70]
49th Precinct[71]
71st Precinct[72]
94th Precinct[73]
33rd Precinct[74]
50th Precinct[75]
72nd Precinct[76]
34th Precinct[77]
52nd Precinct[78]
76th Precinct[79]
78th Precinct[80]

Staten Island now has four precincts: the 120th, 121st (new as of 2013),[81] 122nd, and 123rd.

Queens South began operating a satellite for the large 105th precinct in the southern part of the precinct next to the Rosedale LIRR station in July 2007.[82] This building was, until then, the quarters for the Queens South Task Force, the Queens South Auto-Larceny Unit, the Queens South Anti-Crime Unit, the Queens South Evidence Collection Team, and the Detective Bureau's Queens Major Case Squad. The New 116th precinct would be built on the site of the parking lot next door to the satellite.

Auxiliary Police[edit]

  • Commanding Officer of Auxiliary Police Section – Inspector Phylis S. Byrne Colonel Gold-vector.svg

The NYPD has a reserve police force known as the Auxiliary Police. NYPD Auxiliary Police officers complete a training Academy designated by the NYS Municipal Police Training Council as "part time peace officer" training course. In accordance with New York State law Auxiliary Police Officers are equipped with Police batons. They also carry Police radios and in accordance with NYC administrative code they carry handcuffs. They assist the Police Department with uniformed patrols and provide crowd and vehicular control at special events, accidents, and fire scenes.

Special Operations Bureau[edit]

  • Commanding Officer of Special Operations – Bureau Chief Harry Wedin 3 Gold Stars.svg

Emergency Service Unit[edit]

  • Commanding Officer of Emergency Service Unit – Deputy Chief Vincent Giordano 1 Gold Star.svg

The Emergency Service Unit,[83] a component of the Special Operations Bureau, ESU provides specialized support and advanced equipment to other NYPD units; its members are cross-trained in multiple disciplines of tactical and rescue work- primarily traditional Special Weapons And Tactics (SWAT) duties, physical rescue including vehicle accident extrication, water rescue, structural collapse rescue, the safe handling and subduing of Emotionally Disturbed Persons (EDPs) that include suicidal jumpers on buildings and bridges, and perform basic mechanical & electrical skills that patrol officers are not equipped to handle. As part of its water rescue capability, its members are all rescue divers and it maintains a fleet of jet skis and motorized Zodiac inflatable boats strategically stationed around the city for deployment when needed. The ESU Canine Unit deploys patrol/apprehension and bloodhound dogs to perform searches for perpetrators and missing persons.

Aviation Unit[edit]

  • Commanding Officer of Aviation Unit – Inspector James Coan Colonel Gold-vector.svg

Founded in 1928, it claims the distinction of being the oldest police aviation unit in the world, but there is a competing claim from the London Metropolitan Police Service ("The Met"). Based in Brooklyn, the Aviation Unit responds to various emergencies and tasks, supporting other units of the N.Y.P.D. Among its capabilities are the deployment of divers for water rescues. From a standing start, the unit claims it can be anywhere in the five boroughs within 15 minutes, but this has been disputed and is dependent on weather conditions and air traffic congestion.[84]

Since 9/11 the department has undertaken a major overhaul of the Aviation Unit. Once equipped exclusively with Bell helicopters, it recently re-equipped its fleet with four Agusta A 119 Koala helicopters, and three Bell 412 helicopters. And more recently the department purchased four brand new Bell 429 helicopters, replacing the Agusta helicopters. The centerpiece is a $9.8 million "unmarked" helicopter, which can fly at night without lights. However, this function will require approval from the Federal Aviation Administration and local Air Traffic Control on a case-by-case basis, due to the hazards it could present in the heavily congested New York air corridors. The department has also purchased a state-of-the-art helicopter flight simulator, so officers can practice flying without actually having to take up a helicopter.[85] In 2011 the department said they had .50 caliber machine guns capable of shooting down light planes.[86]

Famed US cyclist Mile-a-Minute Murphy claimed to be the first police officer able to fly a plane in the US (possibly the entire world) as of 1914 as a member of the NYPD. He envisioned the use of airplanes to fight crime around the same time, though the Aviation Unit came into being 11 years after Murphy retired.

Harbor Unit and Scuba Team[edit]

  • Commanding Officer of Harbor Unit –

On March 15, 1858, five members of the New York City Police Department rowed out into New York Harbor to combat piracy aboard merchant ships lying at anchor. The NYPD Harbor Unit has existed ever since, protecting life and property. With hundreds of miles of inland waterways to cover, the unit operates over 36 boats from four bases.[87]

For underwater work, the department used to contract with private diving companies when weapons or other evidence had to be recovered from the bottom of New York's many rivers and waterways. In the early 1970s, however, the Harbor Unit formed a specialized scuba team that today numbers around 30 officers. Unlike many police dive units, whose members dive only part-time, NYPD divers are assigned to the unit full-time. (The exception are some scuba-trained officers in regular patrol units who are detailed to the team temporarily during the busy summer months.)[88] In addition to the normal duties of evidence recovery, the Scuba Team's mission has expanded since 9/11 to include a counter-terrorism role. For air-sea rescue work, the Harbor Unit keeps two divers assigned to the Aviation Unit 24 hours a day, seven days per week, all year round. These divers will work with their counterparts in the FDNY, who arrive at incidents by fireboat or rescue company.

Mounted Unit[edit]

NYPD Mounted Unit officers patrol on horseback (New Year's Eve 2005/06)
  • Commanding Officer of Mounted Unit – Deputy Inspector Barry M. Gelbman US-O4 insignia.svg

The NYPD Mounted Unit was created in 1858 and is used today in the Patrol units. The unit has 70 uniformed officers and supervisors and approximately 45 horses. The unit is divided into 4 "Troops"; Troop B (Manhattan), Troop D (Bronx), Troop E (Brooklyn), and Troop F (Queens).[89]

Strategic Response Group[edit]

Commanding Officer of Strategic Response Group - Inspector John J. D'Adamo Colonel Gold-vector.svg

The Strategic Response Groups are organized within each borough and specialize in rapid mobilization. The Strategic Response Group responds to citywide mobilizations, civil disorders and major events with equipment and trained teams. They maintain order by implementing effective crime and crowd control strategies.

The Strategic Response Group conducts daily counterterrorism deployments in conjunction with other Department units based upon current intelligence and threat assessments. They identify and suppress terrorist surveillance of targets through mobile deployment teams. They respond quickly and decisively to terrorist incidents or threats.

The Strategic Response Group can be deployed to precincts and zones to supplement patrol resources or other Department initiatives.

The Strategic Response Group is organized as follows:

  • SRG 1 Manhattan
  • SRG 2 Bronx
  • SRG 3 Brooklyn
  • SRG 4 Queens
  • SRG 5 Staten Island

Transit Bureau[edit]

  • Commanding Officer of Transit – Bureau Chief Edward Delatorre 3 Gold Stars.svg

The NYPD Transit Bureau is a part of the NYPD that patrols and responds to emergencies within the New York City transit system. Its responsibility includes the New York City Subway network in Manhattan, the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Queens. However, there are certain units that have citywide responsibilities such as the Homeless Outreach Unit and the Vandals Task Force.

The Transit Bureau is divided into Transit Borough Commands. These Borough Commands generally follow the boundaries of the City's geographical boroughs, although there are some notable exceptions. Since there are no subways on Staten Island, there are only four Transit Boroughs: Queens, Bronx, Brooklyn, and Manhattan. Each Transit Borough is further divided into Transit Districts.

As a general rule, each Borough is commanded by an Inspector while Transit Districts tend to be commanded by Captains. The NYPD Detective Bureau investigates all crimes that occur in Transit. Each borough office has assigned detectives from the Detective Bureau similar to the Precinct Detective Squad. As of June 15, 2006 all detectives assigned to investigate transit crimes fall under a unified command (Central Robbery Section) of the Detective Bureau's Special Investigations Division.

Housing Bureau[edit]

  • Commanding Officer of Housing – Bureau Chief James A. Secreto 3 Gold Stars.svg

The Housing Bureau is responsible for providing the security and delivery of police services to 420,000 residents, employees and guests of public housing (projects) throughout New York City. They are stationed in Police Service Areas (PSA), which are almost identical to police precincts, with nine PSAs in total located throughout the five boroughs. Officers often do interior patrols, making sure illegal activity does not take place in the halls, stairways, or the roof.

Transportation Bureau[edit]

  • Commanding Officer of Transportation – Bureau Chief Thomas M. Chan 3 Gold Stars.svg

The Transportation Bureau's responsibilities include traffic enforcement, traffic management, and highway safety.

Special units within the New York City Police Department Transportation Bureau include the Highway Patrol, Traffic Management Center, Traffic Operations District, Citywide Traffic Task Force and the Traffic Enforcement District.

Highway Patrol[edit]

NYPD Highway Patrol Police Motorcycle in Manhattan NYC.
  • Commanding Officer of Highway Patrol – Inspector Steven D'Ulisse Colonel Gold-vector.svg

The New York City Police Department Highway Patrol is a specialized unit under the auspices of the NYPD's Transportation Bureau primarily responsible for patrolling and maintaining traffic safety on limited-access highways within New York City. The NYPD Highway Patrol's other duties and roles include collision investigations, advanced driver and radar training for NYPD officers, field sobriety testing, dignitary and parade escorts, hazardous material and truck traffic enforcement, anti-drag racing programs, and anti-terrorist checkpoints at key bridges and intersections in the city.

The Transportation Bureau also included the Transit Division from 1997 to 1999. That division was upgraded to bureau status, as it once had from 1995 to 1997 and again in 1999.

Traffic Enforcement District[edit]

An NYPD Traffic Enforcement Toyota Prius RMP.
  • Commanding Officer of Traffic Enforcement District – Deputy Chief Michael Pilecki 1 Gold Star.svg

NYPD Traffic Enforcement has many duties including directing traffic, enforcing parking regulations, towing vehicles, providing highway assistance, and enforcing laws related to roadway construction. The men and women in Traffic Enforcement are referred to as Traffic Enforcement Agents (TEAs), and wear uniforms similar to the uniform worn by School Safety Agents, although with a distinctive white uniform cap. There are four levels of Traffic Enforcement Agents with each level handling different duties. Level 1 agents focus on parking regulation enforcement, Level 2 agents focus on directing traffic, Level 3 agents focus on towing vehicles, and Level 4 perform a variety of duties, including specialized enforcement such as street construction permits or truck weight regulations. Only TEAs of Level 4 status have peace officer powers, which allows them to carry handcuffs and make warrantless arrests. TEAs of Level 1–3 status have the authority to issue summonses for parking and moving violations, but no other authority. Older Traffic Enforcement vehicles are dark blue or black with white decals and newer vehicles are white with light blue decals.[90][91] Like School Safety Agents, non-supervisor TEAs wear badges that are oval with an eagle on top, in contrast to the shield worn by police officers and the seven-point star worn by Auxiliary officers.

Detective Bureau[edit]

  • Commanding Officer of Detective – Bureau Chief Dermont Shea 3 Gold Stars.svg

Crime Scene Unit[edit]

  • Commanding Officer of Crime Scene Unit - Deputy Inspector Michael W. King US-O4 insignia.svg

The Crime Scene Unit (CSU) is a unit within the Forensic Investigations Division of the New York City Police Department Detective Bureau.

The Unit is responsible for forensic investigations of all homicides and sexual assaults, as well as other crimes as deemed necessary by an investigating supervisor. Members of the Crime Scene Unit assist the precinct detectives in the processing of a crime scene as well as determining the proper routing of evidence between the NYC Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, the NYPD Police Lab and the NYPD Property Clerk.

The Crime Scene Unit is composed of NYPD detectives (or occasionally police officers that are awaiting their promotion to detective), not civilian technicians like crime scene units in other parts of the U.S. Generally these detectives come from an Evidence Collection Team which is operated at the borough level. The Crime Scene Unit covers all of the boroughs of New York City but is staffed with less than 1% of the total number of detectives in the NYPD.

The Crime Scene Unit has many tools to process a crime scene, including the materials needed to develop fingerprints, cast footwear and tire impressions, follow the trajectory of bullets fired through windows and the chemicals necessary to observe blood under special lighting conditions that would otherwise be invisible to the naked eye. The unit is also trained to process a crime scene in a hazardous environment, for example following a nuclear, biological or chemical attack.

Popular culture[edit]

The CSU is the primary focus of the CBS TV drama CSI: NY, and has been occasionally featured on both CSI: Miami and CSI: Cyber. CSU is also featured on Law & Order, Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, Law & Order: Criminal Intent, and Law & Order: Trial By Jury, though it is not the primary focus of these series.

Special Victims Division[edit]

  • Commanding Officer of Special Victims Division – Deputy Chief Michael J. Osgood 1 Gold Star.svg

The Special Victims Division created in 2003 oversees all the borough Special Victims Squads. The Special Victims Division is part of the New York City Police Department Detective Bureau and investigates the following types of cases:

  • Any child under 13 years of age that is the victim of any sex crime or attempted sex crime by any person.
  • Any child under 11 years of age who is the victim of abuse by a parent or person legally responsible for the care of the child.
  • Any victim of rape or attempted rape
  • Any victim of a criminal sexual act or an attempted criminal sexual act
  • Victims of aggravated sexual abuse
  • Victims of sexual abuse in the first degree

Additional sub-units of the Special Victims Division are listed below:

  • Sex Offenders Monitoring Unit (SOMU): Monitors all state designated sex offenders to ensure they are in compliance.
  • Special Victims Liaison Unit (SVLU): Provides educational lectures to community and advocacy groups, schools and medical institutions concerning public as well as personal safety.
  • DNA tracking unit (DNATU): Tracks and coordinates all scientific evidence relating to investigations involving sexual assault.

The television series Law & Order: Special Victims Unit describes fictionalizations of some of the Special Victims Division's cases.

Major Case Squad[edit]

  • Commanding Officer of Major Case Squad – Deputy Inspector US-O4 insignia.svg

The Major Case Squad, which is a unit within the Special Investigation Division of the New York City Police Department Detective Bureau, is located at One Police Plaza in Manhattan. It handles the following cases:

  • Kidnappings as directed by the Chief of Detectives
  • Burglary or attempted burglary of a bank or bank safe
  • Larceny by extortion or attempt, from a bank
  • Robbery or attempted robbery of a bank by a perpetrator not armed
  • Burglary of a truck contents over $100,000
  • Larceny of a truck contents over $100,000
  • Robbery of a truck and contents by hijacking
  • All robberies in warehouse depots or similar locations where the objects of the crime are a truck or its contents
  • All commercial burglaries in which the value of the property stolen exceeds $100,000

Unlike the fictional Major Case Squad as depicted in Law & Order: Criminal Intent, the squad does not investigate homicides.

Real Time Crime Center[edit]

  • Commanding Officer of Real Time Crime Center – Deputy Inspector Michael Godek US-O4 insignia.svg

Located on the second floor of Police Headquarters, at One Police Plaza, the Real Time Crime Center is essentially a data warehouse and search engine operated by a staff of detectives that assists in providing relevant and timely information to officers conducting an investigation. The computer network stores facts about convicted persons, suspects, encounters, nicknames and items of seemingly trivial value whose correlation could assist in an investigation. The computer network's control room can display real-time satellite and surveillance camera images and hosts a wireless link to police vehicles equipped to generate sketches at crime scenes and transmit them for comparison to stored data.

Legal Bureau[edit]

  • Commanding Officer of Legal – Deputy Commissioner Lawrence Byrne 3 Gold Stars.svg

The NYPD Legal Bureau provides assistance to law enforcement personnel regarding department legal matters. The Legal Bureau also has a memorandum of understanding with the Manhattan DA to selectively prosecute New York City Criminal Court summons court cases, as district attorneys are legally permitted to delegate their prosecution.[92][93][94][95]

The bureau comprises the Civil Enforcement Unit, Criminal Section, Civil Section, Legislative Affairs Unit, Document Production/FOIL, and the Police Action Litigation Section (PALS).

Other units[edit]

Anti-Crime Unit[edit]

Anti-Crime Unit is a unit that is located in all precincts, transit districts (TD), and housing police service areas (PSA). These officers perform patrol services work in their respective command. They are generally tasked differently from a typical uniformed patrol unit. Unlike uniformed patrol units whose main goal is to provide a visible presence in the streets in an effort to deter crime, Anti-Crime Unit specializes in undercover operations and tries to avoid detection in an effort to spot criminals during criminal activity in order to arrest them. Anti-Crime officers, unlike patrol units, are not required to handle typical radio runs, such as accidents, disputes, and general policing calls that uniformed officers are called on for a majority of their jobs. Anti-Crime officers are typically tasked with finding felony suspects, such as those possessing weapons, or committing recurring crimes in the area. If a certain crime is spiking in an area, such as burglary, Anti-Crime officers will be tasked with finding those responsible, usually through following the suspects.

To find street criminals it is important for Anti-Crime officers to not be easily spotted. Anti-Crime officers therefore typically wear plainclothes that match the clothing common to the area. They will always patrol in unmarked vehicles, that cannot be identified at first glance. Some vehicles are simply street appearance editions of standard police vehicles such as the Ford Crown Victoria, Chevrolet Impala, and Ford Taurus. However, they can also use vehicles that are not typically vehicles used by law enforcement, including Honda Accords, Jeep Cherokees, and others. These officers sometimes work in uniform depending on the nature of their assignment.

In the past, Anti-Crime functions were conducted by the citywide Street Crimes Unit. However, after several police involved shootings where the cops had their trials conducted in the media, although they were all acquitted at trial, a notoriety gained from its reputation of aggressive tactics, it was disbanded and replaced by Anti-Crime units that serve the same purpose but fall under the command of the special operations sergeants, lieutenants, or captains in their respective precincts.

Technical Assistance Response Unit[edit]

Established in 1998 under the name "TARU" it was formally known as the Tech Services Unit, originally established in 1972.

  • Commanding Officer of Technical Assistance Response Unit (TARU) – Inspector Gregory AntonsenColonel Gold-vector.svg

The Technical Assistance Response Unit (TARU) provides investigative technical equipment and tactical support to all bureaus within the department. In addition, they also provide assistance to other city, state, and federal agencies. The unit also deals with several forms of computer forensics. The unit is based in NYPD headquarters at One Police Plaza.

Movie and Television Unit[edit]

Founded in 1966, the NYPD Movie/TV Unit was the first of its kind in the country. Because of its relationship with the NYPD, the unit has the greatest knowledge on how to assist productions, particularly with complex shooting situations, in a city that is dense with vehicular and pedestrian traffic. In addition to this expertise, their services are free to productions filming in the city.

Whether it conducts filming on bridges, highways, or busy intersections, the unit controls traffic to ensure that companies can get shots that may otherwise be impossible. Also, the city's many police related shows, such as Law & Order and Third Watch, generate "crime scenes" which are supervised by the Movie/TV Unit. The unit's responsibilities do not end there; the unit also monitors child work permits, stunts, prop firearms, placement of equipment, pedestrian safety, and parking.

While filming on busy New York City streets presents countless challenges, the unit has, over the years, developed a strong working relationship with the film industry. The unit makes an effort to ensure that New York City remains a popular location for filming.

Until the election of Mayor Rudolph Giuliani in 1994, the unit occasionally assisted with pornographic productions. But Giuliani put a stop to this as part of his effort to clean up the streets of New York City. In 1997, porn producer Michael Lucas filed a lawsuit against the Police Department and Giuliani citing discriminating practices used by the Movie/TV Unit against porn productions. The lawsuit was dropped in September 1998 when a district judge granted a motion to dismiss on behalf of the NYPD.[citation needed]

Evidence Collection Teams[edit]

The Evidence Collection Teams are tasked with the collection of evidence at crime scenes in their respective boroughs that are not determined to be at the level necessary to require the Crime Scene Unit.[96] Each patrol borough (Manhattan South, Manhattan North, Bronx, Staten Island, Queens North, Queens South, Brooklyn North, and Brooklyn South) has their own Evidence Collection Team under the control of the respective borough commander. The Evidence Collection Teams are staffed by police officers, sergeants and usually headed by a Lieutenant.

The Evidence Collection Teams were started in Manhattan South by Lt. James Bigclit (Ret.) to take some of the pressure off the Crime Scene Unit and the precinct detective squads by forming a forensic unit to bridge the gap between precinct latent print officers and the Crime Scene Unit. The Evidence Collection Team processes crime scenes pertaining to burglaries, robberies, assaults where the victim is not likely to die, felonious larcenies and other crimes as directed by the duty captain.

Many of the police officers that originally started in the Evidence Collection Team have gone on to transfer to the Crime Scene Unit and become detectives. This transfer is difficult, due to the change from the Patrol Services Bureau to the Detective Bureau, as well as the fact that there are over 150 members of the various Evidence Collection Teams usually vying for one or two slots in Crime Scene.

Although Crime Scene is expected to handle many of the newsworthy or high-profile cases in the city, quite often the Manhattan South Evidence Collection Team is called out to jobs in the Midtown Manhattan area that involve celebrities and wind up on the cover of national newspapers. Recent examples of this include the shooting involving Remy Ma (the rapper) as well as the incident involving Sean "Puffy" Combs and Jennifer Lopez in December 1999.

School Safety Division[edit]

  • Commanding Officer of School Safety Division – Assistant Chief Brian J. Conroy 2 Gold Stars.svg

The School Safety Division is the school police force for New York City Department of Education schools. The agency is a division of the New York City Police Department Community Affairs Bureau, and is one of the largest law enforcement agencies in New York City.

Cadet Corps[edit]

  • Commanding Officer of Cadet Corps – Inspector Michael S. McGrath Colonel Gold-vector.svg

The New York City Police Department Cadet Corps is a form of internship with the New York City Police Department. The program is open to New York City residents who are enrolled in college and have completed 15 or more credits. Residents who have not yet completed a 15 credit requirement are able to join under certain circumstances.

[edit]

  • Commanding Officer of Paid Detail Unit – Captain Carlos A. Fernandez Captain insignia gold.svg

The Paid Detail Unit is a program within the New York City Police Department allowing private corporations to hire NYPD police officers for security duties. The program was introduced in 1998, allowing off-duty officers to wear their uniforms while earning money in second jobs at sports venues, financial institutions and other places of business.[97]

Chaplains Unit[edit]

  • Commanding Officer of the Chaplains Unit - Lieutenant Steven A. Jerome US-O1 insignia.svg
  • Chief Chaplain of the New York Police Department - Chief (Chaplain) Rabbi Dr. Alvin Kass 3 Gold Stars.svg
    • Assistant Chief Chaplain of the New York Police Department - Assistant Chief (Chaplain) Monsignor Robert J. Romano 2 Gold Stars.svg

The Chaplains Unit is made up of the police chaplains of the New York City Police Department. The chaplains wear the uniform of the NYPD, with added insignia of their faith group, but do not have police powers. There are currently nine chaplains of the NYPD made up of ten Christian chaplains, one Jewish chaplain, and one Muslim chaplain.[98]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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  90. ^ Traffic Enforcement Vehicles
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  96. ^ An example: an evidence voucher prepared by a police officer in Manhattan South: Evidence Voucher
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