Philippine Senate election, 1947

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Philippine Senate election, 1947
Philippines
← 1946 November 11, 1947 1949 →

8 (of the 24) seats in the Senate of the Philippines
13 seats needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party
  JoseAvelino.jpg Carlos P Garcia.jpg
Leader José Avelino Carlos P. Garcia
Party Liberal Nacionalista
Leader's seat Nationwide at-large Nationwide at-large
Seats before 10 seats 14 seats
Seats after 15 seats 8 seats
Seat change Increase 5 Decrease 6
Popular vote 12,241,929 10,114,453
Percentage 54.5% 45.0%
Swing Increase 6.8 Increase 3.8

Senate President before election

José Avelino
Liberal

Elected Senate President

José Avelino
Liberal

Coat of arms of the Philippines.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
the Philippines

Elections for the Senate of the Philippines were held on November 11, 1947, with eight of the 24 seats in the Senate being contested. Eight seats were all regular elections; the winners were eligible to serve six-year terms from December 30, 1947 until December 30, 1953. Many gubernatorial and local elections were held on the same date.

Summary[edit]

Going into the 1947 election, the Senate consisted of nine Liberals, 14 Nacionalista, and one Popular Front (Vicente Y. Sotto). Of the seats up for election in 1947, all eight seats are held by Nacionalistas.

Senate President Jose Avelino, president of the Liberal Party, scored the opposition and said, “the Nacionalista Party of today is not the party of Quezon and Osmeña ... (it is) the party of Hukbalahaps and other dissident elements.” In response, Nacionalista Party President Eulogio Rodriguez appealed for the voters to give the opposition a stronger mandate to fiscalize the administration, which they accused of being corrupt and incompetent.[1]

In the 1st Congress, the Liberals hold 14 seats in the Senate, thereby retaining control of the Senate. The Liberals total was reduced to 13 seats pursuant to the Senate Electoral Tribunal resolution in which Senator Carlos Tan (Liberal) was unseated and replaced by Eulogio Rodriguez (Nacionalista) in 1949.

Geronima Pecson became the first woman to be elected in the Senate.

Results[edit]

Per candidate[edit]

e • d Summary of the November 11, 1947 Philippine Senate election result
Rank Candidate Party Votes %
1. Lorenzo Tañada Liberal 1,570,390 48.1%
2. Vicente Madrigal Liberal 1,562,825 47.9%
3. Geronima Pecson Liberal 1,559,511 47.8%
4. Emiliano Tria Tirona Liberal 1,552,545 47.6%
5. Fernando López Liberal 1,543,830 47.3%
6. Camilo Osías Nacionalista 1,512,196 46.3%
7. Pablo Angeles David Liberal 1,489,014 45.6%
8. Carlos Tan1 Liberal 1,480,305 45.3%
9. Primitivo Lovina Liberal 1,473,888 45.2%
10. Eulogio Rodriguez, Sr. Nacionalista 1,346,174 41.2%
11. Felixberto Serrano Nacionalista 1,236,649 37.9%
12. Jose Ma. Veloso Nacionalista 1,225,347 37.5%
13. Emilio Javier Nacionalista 1,210,419 37.1%
14. Sotero Cabahug Nacionalista 1,209,598 37.1%
15. Jesus Barrera Nacionalista 1,201,329 36.8%
16. Jose Imperial Nacionalista 1,172,741 35.9%
17. Hilario C. Moncado Modernist
18. Manuel Dikit Modernist
19. Melchor Lagasca Modernist
20. Rosendo Zaldarriaga Democratic Party
21. Leonardo Tenebro Modernist
Total turnout 3,264,423 77.1%
Total votes 22,474,462 N/A
Registered voters 4,233,528 100.0%
Note: A total of 21 candidates ran for senator. Source:[2]
^1 Replaced by Eulogio Rodriguez as per decision of Senate Electoral Tribunal dated December 16, 1949.


Per party[edit]

Party Popular vote Seats
Total % Won 1946 End 1st 2nd +/−
Start %
Liberal 12,241,929 54.5% 7 0 10 16 66.7% Increase 6
Nacionalista 10,114,453 45.0% 1 0 14 7 29.2% Decrease 7
Independent 102,998 0.5% 0 0 0 0 0.0% Steady
Young Philippines 13,441 0.1% 0 0 0 0 0.0% Steady
Goodwill Party 1,641 0.0% 0 0 0 0 0.0% Steady
Popular Front 0 0.0% 0 1 1 1 0.0% Steady
Totals 22,474,462 100.00% 8 24 24 24 100.0% Steady

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Philippine Electoral Almanac. The Presidential Communications Development and Strategic Planning Office. 2013. p. 22. 
  2. ^ Dieter Nohlen, Florian Grotz and Christof Hartmann, ed. (2001). Elections in Asia and the Pacific Vol. II. Oxford University Press. pp. 185–230. ISBN 0199249598. 

External links[edit]