Pig fallopian tubes

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Pig fallopian tubes
Type Soup
Place of origin Singapore
Region or state Singapore
Main ingredients Pig intestines
Cookbook: Pig fallopian tubes  Media: Pig fallopian tubes

Pig fallopian tubes (Sang Cheong) are used as an ingredient in some Singaporean dishes. The dish has been described by Catherine Ling of CNN as one of the "10 grossest foods in Singapore". According to lore, it can help women to produce more offspring. It is considered a rarity in the country; it is sometimes erroneously referred to as pig intestines or pig uterus. Consuming the fallopian tubes is reportedly good for one's skin, according to one source.

Preparation and description[edit]

Pig fallopian tubes can often be made by stir-frying the fallopian tubes of a pig, before chopping them up. Kung pao sauce is added to the dish and it is served with some vegetables[1] and sambal chilli.[2] On its own, the fallopian tubes are tasteless; the sauce accounts for the its flavour.[2] Fallopian tubes described by Catherine Ling of CNN as "almost crunchy and springy [in texture] but yielding to the bite".[1]

Cultural impact[edit]

Catherine Ling of CNN described pig fallopian tubes as one of the "10 grossest foods in Singapore".[1] Lorraine Koh of Makansutra listed the dish under her list of "5 Wacky Foods in Singapore". According to lore, it can help women to produce more offspring.[2] Also known in Singapore as Sang Cheong, it is considered a rare in the country;[2] According to one source, consuming it will get rid of one's wrinkles, making one's skin smoother and more radiant.[3] Pig fallopian tubes is sometimes erroneously referred to as pig intestines,[4] as well as pig uterus (womb).[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Ling, Catherine (November 18, 2009). "You've been warned -- 10 grossest foods in Singapore". CNN. 
  2. ^ a b c d "5 Wacky Foods in Singapore". Yahoo!. May 17, 2012. Retrieved June 25, 2013. 
  3. ^ "猪大肠" (in Chinese). Liba. Retrieved June 25, 2013. 
  4. ^ Tully, Joyceline (November 8, 2010). "Black gold". AsiaOne. 
  5. ^ Thiel, Julia (April 5, 2013). "Abraham Conlon of Fat Rice shows the "right way" and "wrong way" to cook a porcine reproductive organ". Chicago Reader.