Routt County, Colorado

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Routt County
Entering Routt County from the west on U.S. Route 40
Entering Routt County from the west on U.S. Route 40
Map of Colorado highlighting Routt County
Location within the U.S. state of Colorado
Map of the United States highlighting Colorado
Colorado's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 40°29′N 106°59′W / 40.48°N 106.99°W / 40.48; -106.99
Country United States
State Colorado
FoundedJanuary 29, 1877
Named forJohn Long Routt
SeatSteamboat Springs
Largest citySteamboat Springs
Area
 • Total2,368 sq mi (6,130 km2)
 • Land2,362 sq mi (6,120 km2)
 • Water6.1 sq mi (16 km2)  0.3%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2020)
24,829
 • Density11/sq mi (4/km2)
Time zoneUTC−7 (Mountain)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−6 (MDT)
Congressional district3rd
Websitewww.co.routt.co.us

Routt County is a county located in the U.S. state of Colorado. As of the 2020 census, the population was 24,829.[1] The county seat is Steamboat Springs.[2] Routt County comprises the Steamboat Springs, CO Micropolitan Statistical Area.

History[edit]

Placer gold was found near Hahns Peak in 1864 as part of the Colorado Gold Rush.[3]: 30 

Routt County was created out of the western portion of Grand County on January 29, 1877. It was named in honor of John Long Routt, the last territorial and first state governor of Colorado. The western portion of Routt County was split off to form Moffat County on February 27, 1911.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 2,368 square miles (6,130 km2), of which 2,362 square miles (6,120 km2) is land and 6.1 square miles (16 km2) (0.3%) is water.[4]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major Highways[edit]

National protected areas[edit]

State protected areas[edit]

Trails and byways[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880140
18902,3691,592.1%
19003,66154.5%
19107,561106.5%
19208,94818.3%
19309,3524.5%
194010,52512.5%
19508,940−15.1%
19605,900−34.0%
19706,59211.7%
198013,404103.3%
199014,0885.1%
200019,69039.8%
201023,50919.4%
202024,8295.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
1790-1960[6] 1900-1990[7]
1990-2000[8] 2010-2020[1]

At the 2000 census there were 19,690 people, 7,953 households, and 4,779 families living in the county. The population density was 8 people per square mile (3/km2). There were 11,217 housing units at an average density of 5 per square mile (2/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 96.90% White, 0.13% Black or African American, 0.49% Native American, 0.39% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 0.73% from other races, and 1.28% from two or more races. 3.22% of the population were Hispanic Latino of any race.[9] Of the 7,953 households 31.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.60% were married couples living together, 5.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.90% were non-families. 24.40% of households were one person and 3.70% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.92.

The age distribution was 22.60% under the age of 18, 10.10% from 18 to 24, 36.50% from 25 to 44, 25.70% from 45 to 64, and 5.00% 65 or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 116.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 119.40 males.

The median household income was $53,612 and the median family income was $61,927. Males had a median income of $36,997 versus $26,576 for females. The per capita income for the county was $28,792. About 2.80% of families and 6.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.20% of those under age 18 and 7.70% of those age 65 or over.

Politics[edit]

Routt County tilted Republican for much of the second half of the 20th century. From 1952 to 1988, Republicans carried the county in all but one election. The one break in this trend came in 1964, when Lyndon Johnson won Routt by a healthy margin of 63–37.

Since the late 1980s, Routt County has trended Democratic. It swung from a 34-point win for Ronald Reagan in 1984 to only a five-point win for George H. W. Bush in 1988. In 1992, Bill Clinton became the first Democrat to win the county since 1964 and only the second since 1948, carrying it with modest pluralities in both of his bids. George W. Bush won the county in 2000 by only 264 votes. However, John Kerry won it by a 10-point majority in 2004, and since then Routt has become powerfully Democratic, with Democrats winning by margins rivaling those in the counties closer to Denver. In 2016, Hillary Clinton won the county 54–37. Routt County continued its Democratic trend in 2020, with Joe Biden winning the county 63–35. This is the largest margin of victory for a Democratic presidential candidate in the county since the 1916 election.

United States presidential election results for Routt County, Colorado[10]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 5,925 35.11% 10,582 62.70% 369 2.19%
2016 5,230 37.39% 7,600 54.34% 1,156 8.27%
2012 5,469 41.07% 7,547 56.67% 301 2.26%
2008 4,725 35.80% 8,270 62.66% 204 1.55%
2004 5,199 44.20% 6,392 54.34% 171 1.45%
2000 4,472 46.40% 4,208 43.66% 958 9.94%
1996 3,019 38.52% 3,660 46.70% 1,158 14.78%
1992 2,358 28.89% 3,188 39.06% 2,615 32.04%
1988 3,264 51.65% 2,922 46.24% 133 2.10%
1984 4,239 66.15% 2,051 32.01% 118 1.84%
1980 3,574 53.33% 1,944 29.01% 1,184 17.67%
1976 2,822 54.13% 2,130 40.86% 261 5.01%
1972 2,629 59.33% 1,613 36.40% 189 4.27%
1968 1,602 53.83% 1,076 36.16% 298 10.01%
1964 1,095 36.94% 1,853 62.52% 16 0.54%
1960 1,651 53.83% 1,414 46.10% 2 0.07%
1956 1,811 57.55% 1,330 42.26% 6 0.19%
1952 2,143 57.31% 1,575 42.12% 21 0.56%
1948 1,492 40.87% 2,088 57.19% 71 1.94%
1944 1,869 48.79% 1,940 50.64% 22 0.57%
1940 2,212 44.07% 2,775 55.29% 32 0.64%
1936 1,541 33.68% 2,817 61.57% 217 4.74%
1932 1,568 35.56% 2,643 59.95% 198 4.49%
1928 2,304 57.36% 1,645 40.95% 68 1.69%
1924 1,822 53.51% 1,116 32.78% 467 13.72%
1920 1,854 57.51% 1,224 37.97% 146 4.53%
1916 849 28.76% 1,972 66.80% 131 4.44%
1912 738 26.11% 1,408 49.82% 680 24.06%

Communities[edit]

City[edit]

Towns[edit]

Census-designated place[edit]

Other places[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 5, 2021.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Voynick, S.M., 1992, Colorado Gold, Missoula: Mountain Press Publishing Company, ISBN 0878424555
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 11, 2014.
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 11, 2014.
  7. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 11, 2014.
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 11, 2014.
  9. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  10. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved May 26, 2017.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°29′N 106°59′W / 40.48°N 106.99°W / 40.48; -106.99