Talk:Chang Jiang (motorcycle)

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Chang Jiang is not Qianjiang Global[edit]

"Qian jiang" (modern Pinyin) or "Chang Jiang" (Wade Giles) (钱江) is a common Chinese name for businesses and products, it being one of the names of the Yangtze River. (unsigned comment)

"Qian" and "chang" are not different transcriptions of the same sound in various Pinyins, but stand for different sounds. An older "chang" could be written "chang" or "zhang" in modern Pinyin, but the modern "qian" could have been "chien" before (to cut a tiny piece out of a complex matter). The second character "jiang" we talk of means river in both cases, yet Qian Jiang is short for Qiantang River, (Chinese: 钱塘江; pinyin: Qiántáng Jiāng), while the long river, known to the west as Yangtze River or Yangtze-Kiang, is simplified Chinese: 长江; traditional Chinese: 長江; pinyin: Cháng Jiāng. Spot it? Right! Kiang = Jiang! Err, did I mention that transcription of Chinese is a bit complex?
So now, there are two independent motorcycle makers who decided to name their vehicles after a river (two different rivers, you remember). Both happen to be Chinese, so the rivers they chose are in China. (Btw i read the below mentioned article about different companies making the same Chang Jiang 750, and there is no mentioning of the completely different Qianjiang bikes.) --203.79.252.193 15:29, 10 May 2007 (UTC)

Merge the motorcycle article into the Motorworks article[edit]

Izaakb 16:38, 17 October 2006 (UTC)

This article is duplicative of the older and larger article under Chang Jiang Motorworks. Instead of merging, this article should just be deleted. Izaakb 16:42, 17 October 2006 (UTC)

Ok, I've merged them. -- Bovineone 05:59, 15 December 2006 (UTC)
They are merged into the wrong direction -- the motorcycle was made by several different companies. Izaakb 21:37, 15 December 2006 (UTC)

Multiple companies[edit]

The Chang Jiang Motorworks article fails to properly discuss that there were several companies making the Chang Jiang motorcycle. Better to merge the articles under the Chang Jiang Motorcycle heading which is a more suitable heading.—The preceding unsigned comment was added by 203.206.103.188 (talkcontribs).

Ok, I've added a mention of this but flagged it with "citation needed". -- Bovineone 05:59, 15 December 2006 (UTC)
Try reading these for some understanding of the complexity of the history of these motorcycles.

http://www.changjiang750.com/history.htm http://www.changjiangunlimited.com/hist.htm The heading needs to be changed to Chang Jiang motorcycle as a minimum. The Zhuzhou XJ750 is also often sold as a "Chang Jiang" though more correctly it's a "Xiang Jiang" M-72 02:24, 2 January 2007 (UTC)

Is it still in production?[edit]

The Article doesn't mention wether the CJ Bikes are still in production or if not, when and why production ceased. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 130.149.52.43 (talk) 17:26, 23 February 2015 (UTC)