Talk:Podenco Canario

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Dogs / Breeds  (Rated C-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Dogs, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of articles related to Canidae and Dogs on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by Dog breeds and species task force.
 
WikiProject Spain (Rated C-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Spain, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Spain on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Africa / Spanish Africa (Rated C-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Africa, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Africa on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by Spanish Africa work group (marked as Low-importance).
 

Unsupported and ethnophobic statements[edit]

The article now states:

"Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are a serious pest in the islands, where they were introduced (first on La Palma) in the 16th century. Rabbit hunting with the Podenco Canario is a hugely popular sport, yet can in no way significantly alter the rabbit populations."

So far not too bad, though I can't see how it's not possible to alter the rabbit populations. Obviously hunting is not the only factor affecting them, and winter rainfall (affecting food availability) and disease (possibly introduced by hunters releasing extra rabbits) are important, too. I will eventually delete the last bit unless given proof.

It then goes on:

"The Canary Islanders who hunt with podencos often treat their dogs terribly, keeping as many as fifteen in a small cage and feeding them irregularly and infrequently. At the end of hunting season many hunters abandon their animals; some kill them outright. Females are not spayed and unwanted pups are usually killed via drowning, gunshots or abandonment. Hunters are often selfish and careless, often damaging agricultural areas. The Spaniards, and even more so the Canary Islanders are most often completely egocentric.[5]"


As a Canary native and the rescuer of the very podenco illustrating the article I couldn't agree more with this paragraph, except thah last bit... "The Spaniards, and even more so the Canary Islanders are most often completely egocentric." !!!??? So... are all English to blame for those that hunt foxes? All Americans to blame for all that set bear-traps and the like? Please... The reference offered just talks of rabbit populations on the island of La Palma, and even if it stated anything about egocentrism it would be just be an opinion of the author. Trying to look at it objectively there's not even proof that podencos face worse treatment than galgos do in mainland Spain...
--Mariannep (talk) 12:43, 2 January 2010 (UTC)


Searching through the history of the page the reference at the end of the "egocentric" statement to a paragraph on hunting seasons]... which makes sense.


It should read:
"Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are a serious pest in the islands, where they were introduced (first on La Palma) in the 16th century. Although rabbit hunting with the Podencio Canario is a sport, it is also a necessary part of pest control. Hunting seasons are organised to maximize rabbit control while minimizing any damage hunters and their dogs may do to agricultural areas.[1]"

--Mariannep (talk) 12:52, 2 January 2010 (UTC)

  1. ^ Seasonal Abundance and Management Implications for Wild Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) on La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain, by F. Cabrera-Rodriguez, Consejería de Medio Ambiente y Política Territorial; Wildl. Biol. Pract., December 2008 4(2): 39-47 doi:10.2461/wbp.2008.4.4