Shahab al-Din Abu Hafs Umar Suhrawardi

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Shahāb al-Din Abu Hafs Umar Suhrawardi
Religion Islam, Sunni
Denomination Sunni
Order Suhrawardi Sufi Order
Other names Shahabudin, Shahabuddin, Soharwardi, al-Suhrawardi, Soharwardy, Shahab ad-Din
Personal
Born 1145
Sohrevard, Abbasid Caliphate, now Khodabandeh County, Zanjan Province, Iran
Died 1234 (aged 89)
Baghdad, Abbasid Caliphate, now Iraq
Senior posting
Title Shaykh al-Islam
Period in office 12th-13th century

Shaykh Shahab al-Din Abu Hafs Umar Suhrawardi (c.1145-1234) was a Kurdish[1][2] Sufi and nephew of Abu al-Najib Suhrawardi. He expanded the Sufi order of Suhrawardiyya that had been created by his uncle Abu al-Najib Suhrawardi, and is the person responsible for officially formalizing the order.[3] Suhrawardi is the author of the Awarif ul-Maarif, which is recognized as a masterpiece work in Tasawwuf.

Other transliterations: Shaykh Shihab al-Din ‘Umar al-Suhrawardi, Shaykh 'Abu Hafs al-Suhrawardi, Hadrat Shaykh Shihab al-Din `Umar b. `Abd Allah al-Suhrawardi, Shaykh Shahabuddin Abu Hafs Umar Suhrawardi, Shaykh Shahabuddin Abu Hafs Umar Soharwardi, Shaykh Shahabuddin Abu Hafs Umar Soharwardy, Shaykh Shahabuddin Soharwardi, Shaykh Shahabuddin Soharwardy, Shaykh Umar Shahabuddin Soharwardi.

Life[edit]

Umar Al Suhrawardi s tomb in Baghdad 1918

Suhrawardi traces his lineage back to Abu Bakr, the first Caliph.[4] From an early age onwards, Suhrawardi studied Islamic jurisprudence, law, logic, theology, Quranic studies and Hadith studies.[3] Suhrawardi quickly excelled in his studies and mastered, at an early age, the Shafi'i and Hanbali madhabs.[3] One of his most notable teachers was the famous Sufi, Abdul Qadir Jilani.[3] Suhrawardi was eventually designated as Shaykh al-Islam by al-Nasir under the Abbasids.[3]

The Awarif ul Maarif[edit]

Suhrawardi wrote the Awarif ul-Maarif, or "The Knowledge of the Spiritually Learned."[5][6] The Awarif ul-Maarif quickly became one of the most popular books on Sufism throughout the Muslim world. This book was translated into English by Henry Wilberforce-Clarke and published as "A Dervish Textbook" in 1891. It was reprinted by Octagon Press in 1980.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Medieval Islamic Civilization: An Encyclopedia. New York: Routledge. 2006. p. 775. ISBN 0415966906. Retrieved 2015-03-19. 
  2. ^ John Renard, "Historical dictionary of Sufism ", Rowman & Littlefield, 2005. pg xxviii. excerpt: "Abu 'n-Najib 'Abd al-Qahir as-Suhrawardi, Persian shaykh and author, and scholar who thought Ahmad al-Ghazali, Najm al-Din Kubra and Abu Hafs 'Umar as-Suhrawardi
  3. ^ a b c d e Medieval Islamic Civilization: An Encyclopedia (2006), p. 775
  4. ^ Sheikh Shahabudin Umar Soharwardi 
  5. ^ Medieval Islamic Civilization: An Encyclopedia (2006), p. 776
  6. ^ Silsila-e-Suhrawardiya 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Ohlander, Erik, Sufism in an Age of Transition: Umar al-Suhrawardi and the Rise of the Islamic Mystical Brotherhood (Leiden, Brill, 2008) (Islamic History and Civilization, 71).
  • Huda, Qamar-ul, Striving for Divine Union: Spiritual Exercises for Suhrawardī Sūfīs (Psychology Press, 2003)

External links[edit]