Emerald Triangle

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Emerald Triangle
Map of the Emerald Triangle
Map of the Emerald Triangle
Coordinates: 40°00′07″N 123°32′40″E / 40.00198°N 123.54453°E / 40.00198; 123.54453Coordinates: 40°00′07″N 123°32′40″E / 40.00198°N 123.54453°E / 40.00198; 123.54453
Country United States
State California
Counties Mendocino County, Humboldt County, Trinity County
Largest city Eureka
Area
 • Total 10,260 sq mi (26,600 km2)

The Emerald Triangle refers to a region in Northern California so named because it is the largest cannabis producing region in the United States. Mendocino County, Humboldt County, and Trinity County are the three counties in Northern California that make up this region. Growers have been cultivating cannabis plants in this region since the 1960s, and many growers in Mendocino County today have estimated they make $1 billion a year from cultivating it. The industry exploded in the region with the passage of CA Prop 215 which legalized use of cannabis for medicinal purposes in California.[1] Growing cannabis in The Emerald Triangle is considered a way of life, and the locals believe that everyone living in this region is either directly or indirectly reliant on the marijuana business.[2]

Population[edit]

The total population in the Emerald Triangle is 236,250 according to the 2010 census.[3] The majority of the population is widely spread throughout the woody hills that make up the area. In this sparsely populated region, only the city of Eureka has an urban area approaching 50,000 people. The second and third largest cities, by far larger than any other cities in the region, are Arcata, with 17,231 people, and Ukiah, with 16,075 people.[2][4]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Regan, Trish (January 22, 2009). "Pot growers thrive in Northern California". CNBC. 
  2. ^ a b Ferran, Lee (August 3, 2010). "Legal Pot: Death of the Emerald Triangle?". ABC News. 
  3. ^ "The Emerald Triangle: Ground Zero for Marijuana". Medical Marijuana Blog. April 8, 2010. 
  4. ^ Mahar, Josh (November 26, 2007). "Cascadian Communities: The Emerald Triangle". Cascadia Rising (blog).