Emery Roth

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Emery Roth
Born 1871
Sečovce, Austria-Hungary
Died August 20, 1948
New York City, New York, U.S.
Residence Austria-Hungary, United States
Citizenship
Occupation Architect
Notable work(s) Hotel Belleclaire (1903)
Ritz Hotel Tower (1925)
The Eldorado (1929–31)
The San Remo (1930)
The Ardsley (1931)
300 East 57th Street (1947)
Spouse(s) Ella Grosman
Children Julian, Richard, Elizabeth, Kathrin

Emery Roth (Hungarian: Róth Imre, 1871 – August 20, 1948) was an American architect of Jewish descent who designed many of the definitive New York City hotels and apartment buildings of the 1920s and 1930s, incorporating Beaux-Arts and Art Deco details. His sons continued in the family enterprise, largely expanding the firm under the name Emery Roth & Sons.

Biography[edit]

Born in Sečovce (Hungarian: Gálszécs), Austria-Hungary (now Slovakia) to a Jewish family, he emigrated to the United States at the age of 13 after his family fell into poverty upon his father's death. He began his architectural apprenticeship as a draftsman in the Chicago offices of Burnham & Root, working on the World's Columbian Exposition of 1893. There he met Richard Morris Hunt, who was impressed with his skills and invited Roth to work in his office in New York. Following Hunt's premature death in 1895, Roth moved to the office of Ogden Codman, Jr., a designer and decorator with a Newport clientele. In the interwar years, the firm of Emery Roth delivered some of the most influential examples of architecture for apartment houses in the at-the-time fashionable beaux art-style, especially in Manhattan. In 1938, Roth included his sons Julian and Richard as partners.

Buildings designed[edit]

  • 888 Grand Concourse (1937) (Bronx)
Building Year Location Notes
Hotel Belleclaire 1903 Broadway
The Adath Jeshurun of Jassy synagogue 1903 58 Rivington Street
601 West End Avenue 1915 601 West End Avenue
The First Hungarian Reformed Church 1915 East 69th Street
1000 Park Avenue[1] 1916 Park Avenue and East 84th Street
151 East 80th Street 1922 151 East 80th Street
The Whitby 1924 325 West 45th Street
110 West 86th Street 1924 110 West 86th Street
Chester Court[2][3] 1924 201 West 89th Street
243 West End Avenue 1925 West End Avenue (Manhattan)
Mayflower Hotel 1925 15 Central Park West demolished in 2004
221 West 82nd Street 1925 221 West 82nd Street
930 Fifth Avenue 1925 930 Fifth Avenue
Ritz Hotel Tower 1925 109 East 57th Street With Carrère and Hastings. New York's first residential skyscraper introduced terraces at the setback levels.
41 West 96th Street 1926 41 West 96th Street
65 Central Park West 1926 65 Central Park West; Lincoln Square
The Alden 1927 225 Central Park West; Upper West Side
The Oliver Cromwell 1927 12 West 72nd Street
Warwick Hotel 1927 65 West 54th Street
Hotel Benjamin 1927 125 East 50th Street
Manchester House 1928 145 West 79th Street
The Eldorado 1929–1931 Central Park West Historic District
The Beresford 1929 211 Central Park West
300 West 23rd Street 1929 300 West 23rd Street
35 Prospect Park West 1929 Prospect Park; Brooklyn
Hotel St. George 1930 Brooklyn Heights
Hotel St. Moritz 1930 50 Central Park South
784 Park Avenue 1930 784 Park Avenue
The San Remo 1930 145 and 146 Central Park West The first of the twin-towered residential skyscrapers.
The Ardsley 1931 320 Central Park West Roth's outstanding Art Deco residential skyscraper.
275 Central Park West 1930–1931 275 Central Park West
299 West 12th Street 1931 299 West 12th Street
140 East 28th Street 1932 140 East 28th Street
888 Grand Concourse 1937 888 Grand Concourse
880 Fifth Avenue 1948 880 Fifth Avenue
41 West 96th Street 41 West 96th Street
310 West End Avenue 310 West End Avenue
The Normandy 1948 140 Riverside Drive Last of the twin-towered residences, and Roth's choice for his retirement apartment.
Shenandoah Apartments 10 Sheridan Square

Emery Roth & Sons[edit]

Despite the fact that Roth's sons, Julian and Richard, had joined the firm many years earlier, it was not until 1947 that the firm's name was changed to Emery Roth & Sons, approximately one year before Roth's death.[4] Julian (1901–1992) specialized in construction costs and building materials and technology, while Richard (1904–1987) was named the firm's principal architect. In the 1950s and 1960s Emery Roth & Sons became the most influential architectural firm in New York and contributed substantially in changing the appearance of Midtown and Lower Manhattan. In that particular period of time Emery Roth & Sons designed dozens of speculative office buildings, mostly with curtain wall facades, which soon became a ubiquitous feature of the city.[5] Beginning in the mid-1960s, the firm was also hired as associate architects in large-scale projects like the Pan Am Building (1963), the World Trade Center (1966–1973) and the Citicorp Center (1977). In the early 1960s, Richard Roth's son, Richard Roth, Jr. (b. 1933) became the third generation to join the firm, eventually rising to chief architect CEO and shareholder. As the firm expanded and diversified over six decades, it remained a family business through the 1990s. In 1988 Richard Roth Jr's daughter Robyn Roth-Moise joined the firm as comptroller. Richard Roth Jr's son Richard Lee Roth joined the firm in 1986 and became the chief specification writer for Emery Roth & Sons. Both retired from the firm when Richard Roth Jr retired and was replaced as the company's CEO in 1993 by Robert Sobel, Roth's cousin.[6] But only three years later, in 1996, the firm ceased to operate, apparently because of financial distress.[7] Emery's great-grandson Richard Lee Roth is currently employed in the architectural profession and resides in South Florida.

The extensive architectural records and papers of both Emery Roth and Emery Roth & Sons are now held in the Department of Drawings & Archives at the Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library at Columbia University.

Work by Emery Roth & Sons[edit]

The Look Building (1949).
The Bronx High School of Science (1959).
The MetLife Building (1963).
The Uris Building (1970), now known as Paramount Plaza.
7 World Trade Center (1987 - 2001)
  • 300 East 57th Street (1947)
  • Paris Theater & Office Building (1948)
  • 715 Park Avenue (1949)
  • 945 Fifth Avenue Apartments (1949)
  • Look Building, 488 Madison Avenue (1949)
  • 40 Park Avenue (1950)
  • 45 East End Avenue Apartments (1950)
  • 85 East End Avenue, NE corner of E83rd St (1950)
  • 575 Madison Avenue (1950)
  • 2 Fifth Avenue (1952)
  • 380 Madison Avenue (1953)
  • 30 Park Avenue (1954)
  • 555 Fifth Avenue (1954)
  • 589 Fifth Avenue (1954)
  • National Distillers Building (1954)
  • 430 Park Avenue (Renovation) (1954)
  • Baruch Houses (1954–1959)
  • 460 Park Avenue (1955)
  • Bank of Montreal Building (1955)
  • Colgate-Palmolive Building (1955)
  • Davies Building (1955)
  • 156 William Street (1956)
  • 415 Madison Avenue (1956)
  • 485 Lexington Avenue (1956)
  • 1430 Broadway (1956)
  • 123 William Street (1957)
  • 630 Third Avenue (1958)
  • 750 Third Avenue (1958)
  • 400 Madison Avenue (1958)
  • General Reinsurance Building (1958)
  • 100 Church Street (1958)
  • 2 Broadway (1959)
  • 10 Lafayette Square (Buffalo, New York) (1959)
  • 355 Lexington Avenue (1959)
  • The Bronx High School of Science (1959)
  • Harriman National Bank Building (1959)
  • Lorillard Building (1959)
  • East Ohio Building (Cleveland, Ohio) (1959)
  • 10 East 70th Street Apartments (1960)
  • 80 Pine Street (1960)
  • Mutual of America Building (1960)
  • 850 Third Avenue (1961)
  • Pfizer Building (1961)
  • Diamond National Building (1961)
  • 60 Broad Street (1962)
  • 215 East 68th Apartments (1962)
  • 1180 Sixth Avenue (1962)
  • Bankers Trust Building (1962)
  • Tower East Apartments (1962)
  • Hanover Bank Building (1962)
  • 1212 Sixth Avenue (1963)
  • 250 Broadway (1963)
  • 605 Third Avenue (f/k/a Burroughs Building) (1963)
  • 845 Third Avenue (1963)
  • AXA Financial Center (1963)
  • MetLife Building (Pan Am Building) (1963)
  • Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette Building (1963)
  • 277 Park Avenue (1964)
  • 641 Lexington Avenue (1964)
  • Harcourt, Brace & World Building (1964)
  • Sterling Drug Company Building (90 Park Avenue) (1964)
  • 600 Madison Avenue (1965)
  • Bankers Trust Annex Building (1965)
  • Xerox Building (1965)
  • MGM Building (1965)
  • Leverett Saltonstall Building (1965)
  • Financial Times Building (1965)
  • MacMillan Building (1966)
  • 299 Park Avenue (a.k.a. Westvaco Building) (1967)
  • 909 Third Avenue (1967)
  • ITT-American Building (1967)
  • General Motors Building (1968)
  • 10 Hanover Square (1969)
  • 100 Wall Street (1969)
  • 345 Park Avenue (1969)
  • 1700 Broadway (1969)
  • Burlington House (1969)
  • Random House Building (1969)
  • Schroder Building (1969)
  • Emigrant Savings Bank Building (1969)
  • 77 Water Street (1970)
  • 1633 Broadway (Paramount Plaza) (1970)
  • Interchem Building (1970)
  • 22 Cortland Street (1971)
  • 200 Water Street (a.k.a. 127 John Street) (1971)
  • 600 Third Avenue (1971)
  • 888 Seventh Avenue (1971)
  • Capitol-EMI Building (1971)
  • Park Lane Hotel (New York) (1971)
  • J.P. Stevens Company Tower (1971)
  • One Battery Park Plaza (1971)
  • 55 Water Street (1972)
  • 747 Third Avenue (1972)
  • Harper & Row Building (1972)
  • One Dag Hammarskjold Plaza (1972)
  • North American Plywood Building (1972)
  • Franklin National Bank Building (1972)
  • World Trade Center (1972–1973) with Minoru Yamasaki
  • Blue Cross Building (1973)
  • Merchandise Mart Building (1973)
  • Sovereign Apartments (1973)
  • Winstar Building and Addition (1974)
  • 100 William Street (1974)
  • Citigroup Center (1977)
  • Helmsley Palace Hotel (1981)
  • Crystal Pavilion (1982)
  • 575 Fifth Avenue (1983)
  • 900 Third Avenue (1983)
  • 1155 Avenue of the Americas (1984)
  • Manhattan Tower (1985)
  • Symphony House Apartments (1986)
  • Fifth Avenue Tower (1986)
  • 7 World Trade Center (1987)
  • Ellington Apartments (1987)
  • 17 State Street (1988)
  • 1585 Broadway (1989)
  • 546 Fifth Avenue (1990)
  • Oxford Condominiums (1990)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gray, Christopher (March 9, 2008). "STREETSCAPES: Park Avenue Between 83rd and 84th Street. Seven Apartment Houses in a Piazza-Like Setting". http://www.nytimes.com. New York Times. Retrieved August 2, 2013. 
  2. ^ 201 W. 89 St. - Chester Court, Columbia University Libraries. Retrieved June 16, 2011
  3. ^ About us, Chester Court official website. Retrieved June 16, 2011
  4. ^ Robert A. M. Stern and others: New York 1960, p. 50
  5. ^ Robert A. M. Stern and others: "New York 1960", p. 51
  6. ^ Richard Roth retires; Robert Sobel succeeds. Real Estate Weekly, September 22, 1993. Retrieved June 16, 2011.
  7. ^ Emery Roth & Sons architectural records and papers, 1906-1996 (bulk 1951-1994) at Columbia University Libraries: Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library. Retrieved June 16, 2011

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]