Hidetoshi Nakata

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Hidetoshi Nakata
Hidetoshi Nakata in Okinawa.jpg
Nakata in 2012
Personal information
Date of birth (1977-01-22) January 22, 1977 (age 37)
Place of birth Kofu, Yamanashi, Japan
Height 5 ft 9 in (1.75 m)
Playing position Midfielder
Youth career
1986–1989 Hokushin Boys Soccer Club
1989–1992 Kofu Kita Jr. H.S.
1992–1995 Nirasaki H.S.
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1995–1998 Bellmare Hiratsuka 85 (16)
1998–2000 Perugia 48 (12)
2000–2001 Roma 30 (5)
2001–2004 Parma 67 (5)
2004 Bologna (loan) 17 (2)
2004–2006 Fiorentina 20 (0)
2005–2006 Bolton Wanderers (loan) 21 (1)
Total 288 (41)
National team
1991–1993 Japan U-17 6 (2)
1994–1995 Japan U-20 12 (6)
1995–2000 Japan U-23 12 (3)
1997–2006[1] Japan 77 (11)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Hidetoshi Nakata, Cavaliere OSSI (中田 英寿 Nakata Hidetoshi?, born January 22, 1977 in Yamanashi Prefecture), is a retired Japanese football player. He was considered one of the most famous Asian footballers of his generation.

Nakata began his professional career in 1995 and won the Asian Football Confederation Player of the Year award in 1997 and 1998, the Scudetto with A.S. Roma in 2001, played for Japan in three FIFA World Cup tournaments (1998, 2002 and 2006) and played in the Olympics twice (1996 and 2000). In 2005, he was made the Knight of the Order of the Star of Italian Solidarity, one of Italy's highest honors, for improving the country's image overseas.[2] Nakata has also been involved in fashion, regularly attending runway shows and wearing designer clothing.

Nakata announced his retirement at age 29 on July 3, 2006 after a ten-year career that included seven seasons in the Italian Serie A and a season in the English Premier League. In March 2004, Pelé named Nakata in his FIFA 100, a list of the top living footballers at the time.

Club career[edit]

Nakata began his professional career at age 18 in 1995, with J. League side Bellmare Hiratsuka (now Shonan Bellmare). After the 1998 World Cup in France, Nakata was signed by A.C. Perugia in Italy's Serie A for 4M US$,[3] becoming the second Japanese player ever to appear in the Italian top league after Kazu Miura had done it for Genoa four years earlier. In his first season in Italy, Nakata scored 10 goals, his single-season highest total.

Nakata In 2011

Roma[edit]

In January 2000, after one and a half seasons at Perugia, Nakata moved to Roma for 42 Billion ITL (€21.691 million)[4] helping the team win the scudetto. The highlight of Nakata's career at Roma came on May 6, 2001 in the Serie A match against Juventus at Stadio Delle Alpi. After replacing Francesco Totti in the second half with Roma trailing 0–2, Nakata netted with a 30-yard screamer beyond Juventus goalkeeper Edwin van der Sar's reach, with 11 minutes left in the match. Nakata then helped Roma score the equalizer when his fierce drive from outside the box was parried by Van der Sar into the path of Vincenzo Montella, who scored for Roma in the last minute. The match ended with a 2–2 draw and Roma maintained a six-point margin atop the league table.[5]

Later years (2001–2006)[edit]

In the summer of 2001, Nakata joined Parma[6] for 55 billion lire (€28.4 million)[7][8] where he played for two and a half seasons.

In January 2004, Nakata joined Bologna where he played the remainder of the 2003–04 season before moving to Fiorentina, where he played the following season. In August 2005, Nakata moved to Premiership side Bolton Wanderers on loan. During his season at Bolton, which would be the last of his professional career, he scored once in the league, in a 2–0 win over West Bromwich Albion.[9]

International career[edit]

After having represented Japan at the 1993 U-17 World Championship (where he scored a goal) and at the 1995 U-20 World Championship (where he scored twice), Nakata was part of the Japan squads at the 1996 Olympics, where Japan upset Brazil,[10] and at the 2000 Olympics. His senior national team debut came in May 1997 against South Korea.[1]

He was a key member of the Japanese side that qualified for the 1998 FIFA World Cup, scoring five goals in qualification matches and setting up all three Japanese goals in the qualification play-off against Iran. He helped Japan reach the final of the 2001 Confederations Cup but left the national team before the final to join Roma for their final league matches.[11] Nakata played in all four of Japan's matches at the 2002 FIFA World Cup, co-hosted by South Korea and Japan, scoring the second goal of a 2–0 first round win against Tunisia.

At the 2006 FIFA World Cup, Nakata played in all three matches for Japan, losing to Australia and Brazil, and drawing with Croatia. His performance against Croatia earned him a Man of the Match award.[12] After the 2006 FIFA World Cup, on July 3, 2006, Nakata announced his retirement from professional football and the Japanese national team on his personal website "I decided half a year ago that I would retire from the world of professional football ... after the World Cup in Germany." Nakata wrote, "I will never again stand on the pitch as a professional player. But I will never give up football."[13][14] Even though many people thought he was too young to retire, he didn't change his mind. Nakata said the reason behind his retirement was because he wasn't finding football fun anymore.[15]

On June 9, 2007, he made an appearance on the pitch again for the first time in public after his retirement when he played at Luís Figo's charity match.[citation needed].

Despite Nakata playing every match in Japan's first three World Cup appearances, he was not selected for the country's Asian Cup-winning squads in 2000 and 2004. In total, he was capped 77 times for Japan, scoring 11 goals, 9 of which came in official FIFA competitions.[1]

Career statistics[edit]

Club Season League Cup League Cup Continental1 Super Cup2 Total
Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Bellmare Hiratsuka 1995 26 8 2 1 - 6 1 1 0 35 10
1996 26 2 3 0 12 2 3 0 - 44 4
1997 21 3 3 0 6 1 - - 30 4
1998 12 3 - - - - 12 3
Total 85 16 8 1 18 3 9 1 1 0 121 21
Perugia 1998–99 33 10 - 0 0 - - 33 10
1999–2000 15 2 - 4 1 3 1 - 22 4
Total 48 12 - 4 1 3 1 - 55 14
A.S. Roma 1999–2000 15 3 - 1 0 2 0 - 18 3
2000–01 15 2 - 0 0 7 1 - 22 3
Total 30 5 - 1 0 9 1 - 40 6
Parma 2001–02 24 1 - 6 2 8 1 - 38 4
2002–03 31 4 - 2 0 4 0 1 0 38 4
2003–04 12 0 - 2 0 4 1 - 18 1
Total 67 5 - 10 2 16 2 1 0 95 9
Bologna 2003–04 17 2 - 0 0 - - 17 2
Total 17 2 - 0 0 - - 17 2
Fiorentina 2004–05 20 0 - 3 0 - - 23 0
Total 20 0 - 3 0 - - 23 0
Bolton Wanderers 2005–06 21 1 3 0 2 0 6 0 - 32 1
Total 21 1 3 0 2 0 6 0 - 32 1
Career total 288 41 11 1 38 6 43 5 2 0 382 53

1Includes other competitive competitions, including the Asian Cup Winners' Cup, UEFA Intertoto Cup, UEFA Cup and UEFA Champions League.

2Includes other competitive competitions, including the Japanese Super Cup and Supercoppa Italiana.

National team[edit]

[1]

Japan national team
Year Apps Goals
1997 16 5
1998 10 1
1999 3 0
2000 4 0
2001 7 1
2002 8 2
2003 11 1
2004 2 0
2005 10 0
2006 6 1
Total 77 11

Appearances in major competitions[edit]

Team Competition Category Appearances Goals Team Record
Start Sub
 Japan 1993 FIFA U-17 World Championship U-17 3 0 1 Quarterfinals
 Japan 1994 AFC Youth Championship U-19 6 0 2 Runner-up
 Japan 1995 FIFA World Youth Championship U-20 4 0 2 Quarterfinals
 Japan 1996 Olympics qualification U-22 5 0 1 Qualified
 Japan 1996 Olympics U-23 2 0 0 Round 1
 Japan 1998 FIFA World Cup qualification Senior 11 1 5 Qualified
 Japan 1998 Dynasty Cup Senior 2 0 2 Champions
 Japan 1998 FIFA World Cup Senior 3 0 0 Round 1
 Japan 2000 Olympics qualification U-22 2 0 1 Qualified
 Japan 2000 Olympics U-23 3 0 1 Quarterfinals
 Japan 2001 FIFA Confederations Cup Senior 4 0 1 Runner-up
 Japan 2002 FIFA World Cup Senior 4 0 1 Round of 16
 Japan 2003 FIFA Confederations Cup Senior 3 0 1 Round 1
 Japan 2005 FIFA Confederations Cup Senior 3 0 0 Round 1
 Japan 2006 FIFA World Cup qualification Senior 5 0 0 Qualified
 Japan 2006 FIFA World Cup Senior 3 0 0 Round 1

International goals[edit]

[1]

# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1. June 22, 1997 Tokyo, Japan  Macau 10-0 Won 1998 FIFA World Cup Qualification
2. June 22, 1997 Tokyo, Japan  Macau 10-0 Won 1998 FIFA World Cup Qualification
3. June 28, 1997 Tokyo, Japan  Oman 1–1 Draw 1998 FIFA World Cup Qualification
4. September 7, 1997 Tokyo, Japan  Uzbekistan 6–3 Won 1998 FIFA World Cup Qualification
5. November 8, 1997 Tokyo, Japan  Kazakhstan 5–1 Won 1998 FIFA World Cup Qualification
6. February 15, 1998 Adelaide, Australia  Australia 3–0 Won Friendly
7. June 7, 2001 Yokohama, Japan  Australia 1–0 Won 2001 FIFA Confederations Cup Semi-finals
8. March 27, 2002 Łódź, Poland  Poland 2–0 Won Friendly
9. June 14, 2002 Osaka, Japan  Tunisia 2–0 Won 2002 FIFA World Cup Group Stage
10. June 18, 2003 Saint-Denis, France  New Zealand 3–0 Won 2003 FIFA Confederations Cup Group Stage
11. February 28, 2006 Dortmund, Germany  Bosnia-Herzegovina 2–2 Draw Friendly

Honours[edit]

Achievements[edit]

Outside of football[edit]

Outside of football Nakata has shown interest in fashion, attending runway shows, wearing designer clothing and sporting colorful haircuts. He dyed his hair blond for the 1998 FIFA World Cup, hoping to attract the attention of European scouts. Japanese hairstylist Aki Watanabe credits him as a trendsetter.[19] Andrea Tenerani, photographer for GQ in Italy said of Nakata, "He's perfect; he's like a model. And he's totally obsessed with fashion."[20] Calvin Klein designer Italo Zucchelli said, "(Nakata) plays with fashion like all of them now, but in a cooler, more sophisticated way than many others."[21] He is one of the models featuring the Calvin Klein underwear campaign 2010. He was featured in the July 2007 US version of GQ with a 12-page spread on fall fashion. He was featured in GQ in his home country in December 2011.[22]

Often regarded as a Japanese David Beckham,[23] because of his obsession with fashion and his status as a role model for many Asian Football exports to Europe,[citation needed] Nakata is an editor-at-large at Monocle[24] at the invitation of his friend Tyler Brûlé, who serves as the magazine's editor-in-chief.

Nakata has cited the popular manga and anime series, Captain Tsubasa, as his primary inspiration in choosing football as a career.[25]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "NAKATA Hidetoshi". Japan National Football Team Database. 
  2. ^ "Arise, Sir Nak!". This Is Lancashire. October 14, 2005. Retrieved July 3, 2006. 
  3. ^ Source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/football/2001/jul/24/newsstory.sport1
  4. ^ "BILANCIO D'ESERCIZIO E CONSOLIDATO DI GRUPPO AL 30 GIUGNO 2000". AS Roma (in Italian) (Borsa Italiana Archive). Retrieved 2010-04-02. 
  5. ^ (Italian) Source: http://www.repubblica.it/online/campionato_partite/juveroma/juveroma/juveroma.html
  6. ^ "Nakata joins Parma". BBC. 6 July 2001. Retrieved 5 January 2013. 
  7. ^ "AS Roma SpA bilancio 30.06.2001" [AS Roma SpA Report and Accounts on 30 June 2001]. AS Roma (PDF, require login and purchase) (in Italian) (CCIAA (Italian company filing office)). 
  8. ^ "Parma, non solo Nakata". La Gazzetta dello Sport (in Italian). 6 July 2001. Retrieved 13 April 2013. 
  9. ^ "Bolton 2-0 West Brom". BBC. 23 October 2005. Retrieved 15 September 2009. 
  10. ^ "Japan in need of miracle". 2006 FIFA World Cup. June 21, 2006. Retrieved July 3, 2006. 
  11. ^ "Just making the final was a triumph for cup co-host". Sports Illustrated (Associated Press). June 11, 2001. Retrieved July 3, 2006. 
  12. ^ "Japan 0-0 Croatia". BBC News. June 18, 2006. Retrieved July 7, 2008. 
  13. ^ "Japan and Bolton midfielder Nakata to retire". Reuters. July 3, 2006. Retrieved July 3, 2006. 
  14. ^ "To live is to journey, and to journey is to live.". Hidetoshi Nakata. July 3, 2006. Archived from the original on May 17, 2007. Retrieved January 22, 2007. 
  15. ^ "Hidetoshi Nakata: Why I fell out of love with football". inside World Soccer. 15 January 2014. Retrieved 16 January 2014. 
  16. ^ "Calcio News 1998–1999 (data of 2/1)" (in Japanese). Retrieved July 25, 2011. 
  17. ^ "Calcio News 1999–2000 (data of 1/26)" (in Japanese). Retrieved July 25, 2011. 
  18. ^ "FIFA World player 2002". Retrieved July 25, 2011. 
  19. ^ Sodje, Efe (2002). "Footballers ... haircuts. Not always the best combination!". BBC. Retrieved July 4, 2006. 
  20. ^ Martin, J. J. (July 1, 2002). "Feast for marketers: It's all about soccer". International Herald Tribune. Archived from the original on August 27, 2006. Retrieved July 4, 2006. 
  21. ^ Wilson, Eric (June 22, 2006). "BLEACH IT LIKE BECKHAM: World Cup of hair style". New York Times. Archived from the original on July 16, 2006. Retrieved July 4, 2006. 
  22. ^ "Store Mags GQ Japan December 2011". Retrieved November 28, 2011. 
  23. ^ Source: http://www.fifa.com/worldfootball/news/newsid=1436739.html
  24. ^ Hide Chaser |nakata.net - 中田英寿オフィシャルホームページ
  25. ^ 'I don't understand why people are football fans. I don't like to watch any kind of sport' - by Jonathan Northcroft, The Sunday Times, January 1, 2006.

External links[edit]