Osage, Iowa

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Osage, Iowa
City
Downtown Osage, Iowa.
Downtown Osage, Iowa.
Location of Osage, Iowa
Location of Osage, Iowa
Coordinates: 43°17′5″N 92°48′44″W / 43.28472°N 92.81222°W / 43.28472; -92.81222Coordinates: 43°17′5″N 92°48′44″W / 43.28472°N 92.81222°W / 43.28472; -92.81222
Country United States
State Iowa
County Mitchell
Government
 • Mayor Steve Cooper
Area[1]
 • Total 2.24 sq mi (5.80 km2)
 • Land 2.24 sq mi (5.80 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,181 ft (360 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 3,619
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 3,626
 • Density 1,615.6/sq mi (623.8/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP codes 50454, 50461
Area code(s) 641
FIPS code 19-59745
GNIS feature ID 0459903

Osage is a city in Mitchell County, Iowa, United States. The population was 3,619 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Mitchell County.[4]

Geography[edit]

Osage is located at 43°17′5″N 92°48′44″W / 43.28472°N 92.81222°W / 43.28472; -92.81222 (43.284618, -92.812129).[5]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.24 square miles (5.80 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical populations
Year Pop. ±%
1870 1,400 —    
1880 2,012 +43.7%
1890 1,913 −4.9%
1900 2,734 +42.9%
1910 2,445 −10.6%
1920 2,878 +17.7%
1930 2,964 +3.0%
1940 3,196 +7.8%
1950 3,436 +7.5%
1960 3,753 +9.2%
1970 3,815 +1.7%
1980 3,718 −2.5%
1990 3,439 −7.5%
2000 3,451 +0.3%
2010 3,619 +4.9%
Source:"American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau.  and Iowa Data Center

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 3,619 people, 1,614 households, and 954 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,615.6 inhabitants per square mile (623.8/km2). There were 1,756 housing units at an average density of 783.9 per square mile (302.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 98.1% White, 0.2% African American, 0.1% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 0.6% from other races, and 0.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.3% of the population.

There were 1,614 households of which 26.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.1% were married couples living together, 8.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 40.9% were non-families. 36.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 21% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.16 and the average family size was 2.81.

The median age in the city was 45.2 years. 22.5% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 20.4% were from 25 to 44; 24.9% were from 45 to 64; and 25.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 46.5% male and 53.5% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 3,451 people, 1,528 households, and 950 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,650.8 people per square mile (637.5/km²). There were 1,624 housing units at an average density of 776.9 per square mile (300.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 99.16% White, 0.17% African American, 0.09% Native American, 0.12% Asian, 0.17% from other races, and 0.29% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.72% of the population.

There were 1,528 households out of which 26.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.5% were married couples living together, 7.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.8% were non-families. 34.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 21.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.19 and the average family size was 2.81.

Age spread: 22.5% under the age of 18, 6.7% from 18 to 24, 23.1% from 25 to 44, 19.0% from 45 to 64, and 28.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 84.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 79.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $30,676, and the median income for a family was $39,856. Males had a median income of $31,488 versus $22,688 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,366. About 5.5% of families and 7.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.1% of those under age 18 and 9.2% of those age 65 or over.

History[edit]

The first plat of the town was started in 1854 by a Dr. Moore and named after his eldest daughter "Cora", but the name was never recorded. In 1855 a Mr. Gibbs arrived from Massachusetts, representing wealthy capitalists in Massachusetts and Connecticut. He prevailed upon Mr. Orrin Sage, a great banker from Ware, MA to invest in this community, and later Mr. Sage gave $2,000 and 600 acres of land to the Library Building Fund. Because of his benevolence, the town's name was changed to Osage in his honor. In the winter of 1855-56, Dr. S. B. Chase of Decorah purchased land in the southwest part of the tract and in the spring of 1856 platted the present City of Osage. He named the east-west streets generally for trees and numbered the north-south streets. He was also responsible for setting out maple trees to line the streets. Even today, Osage is referred to as "the City of Maples". Dr. Chase built an elaborate residence and office on Free Street in 1869. That house still stands today and is used as apartments. Ten years after Dr. Chase's death in 1891, Free Street was renamed Chase Street to honor his many contributions to Osage. On March 9, 1866 Elijah Dunham (1810-1893), his wife, and younger children arrived at Osage having come to join their elder son William. Writing on March 13, 1866 to a son who remained in Canada, Dunham wrote "we are very well Satisfied with the western prairies we Have seen some fine farms and good Houses[,] barns are not much there is Piles of straw all over the Land where it is grown[.] we have not got a house Yet [but] we have good quarters At the place where William boarded [and] the Man and his wife is verry sociable . . . In the town of Osage there is . . . A great crowd of emigrants to this place every Corner is full."[7] Several of the businesses in Osage occupy structures built in the 1870s. City Hall occupies the former Sage Library Building constructed in 1910 after a $10,000 gift from Andrew Carnegie. The very first library building was built in 1876 one-half block west of the current City Hall/Sage Library building. Subway sandwich shop occupies the ground floor of the building today and the date of 1876 along with "Sage Library" is seen in the concrete and brick work of the second story. Because of the age and preservation of many of the downtown buildings, the State Historical Society designated a three-block area on Main Street as "Osage Commercial Historic District" in October, 1966. Osage is the county seat of Mitchell County and boasts the second-oldest courthouse in operation west of the Mississippi River. The courthouse was built in 1858 and has had some updates and additions, but is still used fully for all County business. The census of 2000 listed a population for Osage of 3,451. In 2005 an area on the east edge of Osage along Main Street was annexed into the City and added 11 new residents to the City of Osage, along with several businesses. Osage has had many prominent citizens over the years, most whose names could be tied to a business or profession in Osage. But there have been a few who have made a name for themselves beyond their hometown. One of those is Hamlin Garland, an author of the early 1900s who spent his youth in Osage. One of his first books, "Son of the Middle Border", is basically an autobiography of the time he spent growing up in Osage after the Civil War. Another notable who calls Osage home is former Secretary of Agriculture, Mike Johanns, who grew up on a farm in rural Osage. Prior to his position in Washington, D.C., he was the governor of Nebraska. He still has siblings in Osage.[8]

Attractions[edit]

Cedar River Complex - The Cedar River Complex (CRC) is a community recreation destination that includes an events center, wellness center, museum and auditorium. The CRC offers opportunities to meet, play, learn and enjoy. Located in Mitchell County, Iowa, the Cedar River Complex is a multi-faceted recreation facility which includes an events center, a wellness center, the Mitchell County Historical Museum and an auditorium.[9]

Watts Theatre - The Watts Theatre was opened in 1950 by the Jim Watts family, with a showing of "Dancing in the Dark." The 44 by 132 foot building was designed and built as a state-of-the-art theater and included 580 seats and living quarters upstairs for the Watts family. In 1994 Paul and Gloria Bunge purchased the building (which had been closed and stripped of all its equipment and seating) and restored it to its previous glory, including new heating and air conditioning, new projection equipment and a new sound system. The Bunges widened the aisles, left more room between rows, and installed 364 new seats designed for the building. On June 14, 1994, the theater was reopened, again showing "Dancing in the Dark." The Bunges sold the theatre in 1998 to Robert Williams and his adult children, Bethany Jablonski, Ryan Williams, and Steve Williams. The Williams family made several improvements to the theatre, including a new roof, a replacement neon system, equipment upgrades, and a complete refurbishing of the apartment (which is now used as a viewing room and party facility). In October 2006, the Williams family sold the theatre to the Walk Family.[10]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-05-11. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-05-11. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-23. 
  4. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ Elijah Dunham, letter of March 13, 1866, Osage, Iowa, to Robert Dunham, Peel Twp., Canada West, as quoted in Stott, Greg (2005). I Think I Have the Dunham Pedigree: The Story of the Robert and Louisa (Green) Dunham FamilyArkona, Ontario: G. Stott Press, 107-108.
  8. ^ Historical Society. (n.d.). History of osage. Retrieved from City Of Osage website: http://www.osageia.govoffice3.com/vertical/Sites/{3F252BE3-577E-472C-9507-5A2DD3BD1745}/uploads/{95668F12-441D-43CD-B8FE-C8C89135F5AD}.PDF
  9. ^ A new community destination. (2010, December 21). Retrieved from http://www.cedarrivercomplex.com/page.aspx?n=CRC
  10. ^ Watts history. (2009, December 31). Retrieved from http://wattstheatre.com/history.html
  11. ^ "Steve Darrell". IMdB. Retrieved 23 May 2014. 
  12. ^ "JOHANNS, Mike, (1950 - )". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved October 19, 2012. 

External links[edit]