Sts. Constantine and Helen Serbian Orthodox Church

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Saints Constantine and Helen Serbian Orthodox Church
Saints Constantine and Helen Serbian Orthodox Church
Coordinates: 29°17′33″N 94°48′46″W / 29.292503°N 94.812712°W / 29.292503; -94.812712
Location Galveston, Texas
Country USA
Denomination Serbian Orthodoxy
Previous denomination Russian Orthodoxy
History
Founded 1861 (1861) (parish founded)
Consecrated 3 June 1896
Architecture
Status Parish church
Architectural type Serbo-Byzantine[citation needed]
Groundbreaking 1895
Completed 1896
Administration
Parish Saints Constantine and Helen Parish
Metropolis Metropolitanate of Libertyville-Chicago
Diocese Diocese of New Gracanica - Midwestern America
Synod Holy Synod of Bishops of the Serbian Orthodox Church
Clergy
Bishop(s) Vladika Longin
Priest(s) Serge Veselinovich

The Saints Constantine and Helen Serbian Orthodox Church (Serbian: Цара Константина и Јелене Српске православне цркве) is a Serbian Orthodox church located in Galveston, Texas, USA. It is a parish of the Serbian Orthodox Diocese of New Gracanica - Midwestern America.

History[edit]

The eastern orthodox community had existed in the port city of Galveston since 1861 as the parish of Saints Constantine and Helen.[1][2][3] By the late 1800s a group of Serbs, Greeks, and Russians appealed to the Holy Synod of the Russian Orthodox Church in St. Petersburg, Russia, and Tsar Nicholas II for a church.[1] The Tsar approved the establishment of a church and in 1895 construction began. The building was finished in 1896 and consecration took place on the feast day of Saint Constantine and Saint Helen.[1] Tsar Nicholas II also personally donated icons for the Iconostasis, a gospel book, and a number of sacred vessels. The first priest assigned to the new church was Archimandrite Theoclitos (Triantafilides).[3][4][5] Services were originally held in Greek, Russian and Serbian; however, in 1933 the Greek members of the church voted create a "daughter parish" of Sts. Constantine and Helen and operate it under the Greek Orthodox Church, naming their new church Assumption of the Virgin Mary Greek Orthodox Church.[6][7][8]

Saints Constantine and Helen Serbian Orthodox Church was the first Serbian Orthodox church in the state and its parish is the oldest Orthodox parish in Texas.[5] The church also holds the distinction of being the second oldest Serbian Orthodox church in the United States.[5]

Notable clergy[edit]

Galveston native, Metropolitan Bishop Christopher Kovacevich of the Metropolitanate of Libertyville-Chicago, was born and raised as a member of Saints Constantine and Helen church.[5] As an adult and Metropolitan, he would frequently return to the city and preside at church weddings and baptisms.[9]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Casanova, Amanda (2010-05-10). "Serbian Orthodox church to break ground". Galveston County Daily News. Retrieved 2011-02-25. [dead link]
  2. ^ "CONSECRATION OF THE HOLY THREE HIERARCHS CHURCH IN DALLAS/FORT WORTH, TEXAS". Central Church Council of the Serbian Orthodox Church in America and Canada. 2008-05-23. Retrieved 2011-02-25. 
  3. ^ a b Milosevich, Mimo (2010-01-23). "First priest of isle parish made lasting impact". Galveston County Daily News. Retrieved 2011-02-25. 
  4. ^ "Ss. Constantine and Helen Serbian Orthodox Church". Orthodox Christian Religious Foundation. 2011-02-25. 
  5. ^ a b c d "BISHOP LONGIN VISITS GALVESTON, TEXAS". Central Church Council of the Serbian Orthodox Church in America and Canada. 2010-12-13. Retrieved 2011-02-25. 
  6. ^ The European Texans. Texas A&M University Press. 2004. p. 171. ISBN 978-1-58544-352-9. Retrieved 2011-02-27. 
  7. ^ "Assumption of the Virgin Mary Greek Orthodox Church". The Orthodox Clergy Association of Southeast Texas. Retrieved 2011-02-27. 
  8. ^ "Brief History of the Greek Parish of Galveston, Texas". Assumption of the Virgin Mary Greek Orthodox Church. Retrieved 2011-02-27. 
  9. ^ Turner, Bronwyn (2010-08-22). "Island native, Serbian Orthodox Church leader dies". Galveston County Daily News. Retrieved 2011-02-25. 

External links[edit]