Sharon Salzberg

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Sharon Salzberg
SharonSalzberg bw.jpg
Born 1952 (age 61–62)
New York City
Occupation author, meditation teacher

Sharon Salzberg (born 1952) is a New York Times Best selling author[1] and influential teacher of Buddhist meditation practices in the West.[2][3] In 1974, she co-founded the Insight Meditation Society at Barre, Massachusetts with Jack Kornfield and Joseph Goldstein. Her emphasis is on vipassanā (insight) and mettā (loving-kindness) methods,[4] and has been leading meditation retreats around the world for over three decades.[5][6] All of these methods have their origins in the Theravada Buddhist tradition. Her books include Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness (1995), A Heart as Wide as the World (1999) and Real Happiness - The Power of Meditation: A 28-Day Program (2010), which was on the The New York Times Best Seller list in 2011.[7]

Early life[edit]

Born in New York City to a Jewish family, Salzberg had a troubled early life after her parents divorced when she was four, and her father abandoned the family. At nine, her mother died and she went to live with her father's parents. Though her father returned when she was eleven, he soon overdosed and was subsequently hospitalized. He was soon placed in the mental health system, where he remained until his death. By 16, Sharon had lived with five different families.[8]

In her sophomore year at the State University of New York, Buffalo in 1969, Salzberg encountered Buddhism during a course in Asian philosophy. The following year, she took an independent study trip to India, and in January 1971 attended her first intensive meditation course at Bodh Gaya. In the next several years, she engaged in intensive study with various Buddhist teachers. After returning to US in 1974, she began teaching vipassana (insight) meditation.[8][9]

Career[edit]

Salzberg is a student of Dipa Ma, Anagarika Munindra and other Asian masters.[10] She, Jack Kornfield and Joseph Goldstein founded the Insight Meditation Society at Barre, Massachusetts in 1974.[11][12] She and Goldstein co-founded the Barre Center for Buddhist Studies in 1989 and The Forest Refuge, a long-term meditation retreat center 9 years later. Today, she is a notable teacher of the Vipassana movement.

An in-depth interview with Salzberg appears in the book Meetings with Remarkable Women: Buddhist Teachers in America, by Lenore Friedman. (Boston:Shambhala, Revised and Updated edition, 2000. ISBN 1-57062-474-7)

Honors[edit]

Sharon Salzberg was honored by the New York Open Center in 1999 for her "Outstanding Contribution to the Mindfulness of the West"

Appointments[edit]

Books[edit]

Audio Publications[edit]

Articles[edit]

Interviews[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ New York Times Best Seller List 3/13/10
  2. ^ "Meditation made easy". Well & Good NYC. 
  3. ^ Ricci, Claudia (August 24, 2011). "How One Book Changed My Life". Huffington Post. 
  4. ^ a b Downing, Renée (15 September 2005). "Sharon Salzberg believes in the power of kindness". Tucson Weekly. Retrieved 28 September 2010. 
  5. ^ "Sharon Salzberg (interview)". CBC Radio. November 29, 2009. 
  6. ^ "Insight LA". University of the West. April 6, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Best Sellers, March 13, 2011". New York Times. March 13, 2011. 
  8. ^ a b Morris, Nomi (February 19, 2011). "Through meditation, she makes happiness an "inside job"". Los Angeles Times. 
  9. ^ About
  10. ^ Amy Schmidt, Dipa Ma: The Life and Legacy of a Buddhist Master. ISBN 0-9742405-5-9 (USA); ISBN 1-899579-73-7 (Europe), p. 9.
  11. ^ Miller, Andrea (March 2011). Shambhala Sun (B000302EG0): 52. 
  12. ^ Leslie Kaufman (May 25, 2008). "A Superhighway to Bliss". New York Times. 

External links[edit]