Skelton-in-Cleveland

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Skelton-in-Cleveland
Skelton-in-Cleveland is located in North Yorkshire
Skelton-in-Cleveland
Skelton-in-Cleveland
 Skelton-in-Cleveland shown within North Yorkshire
Population 6,396 
OS grid reference NZ655189
Civil parish Skelton and Brotton
Unitary authority Redcar and Cleveland
Ceremonial county North Yorkshire
Region North East
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town SALTBURN-BY-THE-SEA
Postcode district TS12
Police Cleveland
Fire Cleveland
Ambulance North East
EU Parliament North East England
List of places
UK
England
Yorkshire

Coordinates: 54°33′43″N 0°59′15″W / 54.5619°N 0.9874°W / 54.5619; -0.9874

Skelton-in-Cleveland is a small town in the civil parish of Skelton and Brotton in the unitary authority of Redcar and Cleveland and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire in the North East of England. It is situated at the foot of the Cleveland Hills and about 10 miles (16 km) east of Middlesbrough. Skelton is made up of North Skelton, Skelton Green and New Skelton. The first real mention of Skelton is in the Domesday Book, which talks about taxes collected. Skelton Castle was built in the 12th century by the de Brus (Bruce) family.[1] The population of Skelton-in-Cleveland is 6,396 (2001 census).[2]

All Saints Churches[edit]

Old All Saints Church is a redundant Church of England church, built in Georgian times; it is set in parkland with views to the 18th-century Gothic style country house, called Skelton Castle. Graves can be seen in the churchyard with skull-and-crossbone motifs. The church was mostly rebuilt in 1785, on a site where two previous churches were built. The pulpit, the box-pews and other furnishings, date from the rebuilding, with slightly earlier text boards and some older monuments on a remaining medieval wall. The outside stonework shows a herringbone tooling in keeping with local styles, in contrast to the 'Venetian' east window and the dark pink colouring of the interior.[3]

A new All Saints church was built nearby, in 1884, by R.J. Johnston of Newcastle. It is in the decorated style and of dressed sandstone with ashlar, with plain clay tiled roofs.[4] After the new church was built, the Georgian church fell into disrepair, declared redundant and is now mainained by the Churches Conservation Trust. Both churches are Grade II listed buildings.[5]

References[edit]