963

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
963 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 963
CMLXIII
Ab urbe condita 1716
Armenian calendar 412
ԹՎ ՆԺԲ
Assyrian calendar 5713
Balinese saka calendar 884–885
Bengali calendar 370
Berber calendar 1913
Buddhist calendar 1507
Burmese calendar 325
Byzantine calendar 6471–6472
Chinese calendar 壬戌(Water Dog)
3659 or 3599
    — to —
癸亥年 (Water Pig)
3660 or 3600
Coptic calendar 679–680
Discordian calendar 2129
Ethiopian calendar 955–956
Hebrew calendar 4723–4724
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1019–1020
 - Shaka Samvat 884–885
 - Kali Yuga 4063–4064
Holocene calendar 10963
Iranian calendar 341–342
Islamic calendar 351–352
Japanese calendar Ōwa 3
(応和3年)
Javanese calendar 863–864
Julian calendar 963
CMLXIII
Korean calendar 3296
Minguo calendar 949 before ROC
民前949年
Nanakshahi calendar −505
Seleucid era 1274/1275 AG
Thai solar calendar 1505–1506
Tibetan calendar 阳水狗年
(male Water-Dog)
1089 or 708 or −64
    — to —
阴水猪年
(female Water-Pig)
1090 or 709 or −63
Emperor Nikephoros II (c. 912–969)

Year 963 (CMLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

Asia[edit]

  • The Chinese government of the Song Dynasty attempts to ban the practice of cremation; despite this decree, the lower and middle classes continue to cremate their dead, until the government resolves the problem in the 12th century, by establishing public graveyards for paupers.
  • The Nanping State, one of the Ten Kingdoms in south-central China, is forced to surrender, when invaded by armies of the Song Dynasty.

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambrigde Medieval History, Volume III, p. 592. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  2. ^ Ostrogorsky, George (1969). History of The Byzantine State. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press. p. 284. ISBN 0-8135-0599-2. 
  3. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambrigde Medieval History, Volume III, p. 248. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.