Arab Ba'ath Progressive Party

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Arab Ba'ath Progressive Party
حزب البعث العربي التقدمي
Leader Fuad Dabbour
Founded 1993[1]
Headquarters Amman, Jordan[1]
Ideology Neo-Ba'athism
Assadism
International affiliation Ba'ath Party (Syrian-dominated faction)
House of Representatives
0 / 130
House of Senate
0 / 75
Party flag
Flag of the Ba'ath Party.svg
Website
www.abpparty.org

The Arab Ba'ath Progressive Party (Arabic: حزب البعث العربي التقدمي Hizb Al-Ba'ath Al-'Arabi Al-Taqadumi) is a political party in Jordan. It is the Jordanian regional branch of the Syrian-led Ba'ath Party. It was legally registered for the first time in 1993.[2] The party is small, and has, according to a WikiLeaks document, "minuscule number of adherents".[2] Despite it small size, the branch is able through its leader, Fuad Dabbour, able to get a decent footprint in Jordanian media.[2] Dabbour's fiery statements on foreign policy are frequently quoted by the press.[2] The party is less known than its pro-Iraqi counterpart, the Jordanian Arab Socialist Ba'ath Party.[3] It is the party branch of the Syrian-dominated Ba'ath Party in Jordan.[4] Fuad Dabbour is the branch's Regional Secretary.[5] It is believed that the party has fewer than 200 members.[6]

Political platform[edit]

The party's stated objectives are:

  • The struggle for the supremacy and institutionalization of democracy as well as the rule of law and constitution.[1]
  • The removal of control of the people’s will and achievement of political and economic reform in the interest of the people.[1]
  • Adherence to the monotheistic religions and respect of the national heritage and the Arab nation’s unity.[1]
  • Consolidation of the democratic system and the achievement of Arab economic integration.[1]

Regional Secretaries[edit]

  • Mahmood Ma′ayteh
  • Fuad Dabbour

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Al-Ba'th Progressive Party". Guide to Jordanian Politics Life. n.d. Retrieved 28 June 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Sometimes The Weak Survive - Jordan's New Political Party Map". Cablegate. 12 May 2008. Retrieved 10 July 2013. 
  3. ^ Staff writer (2002). Jordan in Transition. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 120. ISBN 978-0-312-29538-7. 
  4. ^ http://www.baath-party.org/download/99_low.pdf
  5. ^ "Dabour ... Halting normalization with the Zionist enemy is a Pan-Arab necessity". The Ba'ath Message. Arab Socialist Ba'ath Party – Syria Region. 25 April 2010. p. 11. Retrieved 10 July 2013. 
  6. ^ "Jordan's Political Parties: Islamists, Leftists, Nationalists And Centrists". WikiLeaks. 20 May 2003. Retrieved 10 July 2013.