Archbishop Carroll High School (Washington, D.C.)

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Archbishop Carroll High School
Address
4300 Harewood Road NE

,
20017

United States
Coordinates38°56′24″N 77°00′11″W / 38.940°N 77.003°W / 38.940; -77.003Coordinates: 38°56′24″N 77°00′11″W / 38.940°N 77.003°W / 38.940; -77.003
Information
Former nameThe Archbishop John Carroll High School
TypePrivate, Coeducational, College Preparatory
MottoPro Deo et Patria[1]
(For God and Country)
Religious affiliation(s)Roman Catholic
Patron saint(s)St. Augustine of Hippo [1]
Established1951
FounderCardinal-Archbishop Patrick A. O'Boyle[1]
AuthorityArchdiocese of Washington Catholic Schools [2]
PresidentLarry S. Savoy, Jr.
PrincipalÉlana Gilmore
Teaching staff40.5 (on FTE basis)[3]
Grades912
Enrollment385[4] (2018–19)
Student to teacher ratio9.8[3]
Campus typeUrban (Suburban-esque, Mixed Residential-Commercial Neighborhood) [5]
Color(s)Green and gold          
Athletics conferenceWashington Catholic Athletic Conference
NicknameLions
AccreditationMiddle States Association of Colleges and Schools[6]
PublicationGreen Notes
Website

Archbishop Carroll High School (ACHS, ACHS-DC, ACHSDC, or Carroll) is a private college preparatory, co-educational, Catholic high school located in the Brookland Neighborhood of Washington, D.C., serving students from the Washington Metropolitan Area. It is owned and operated by the Archdiocese of Washington and is part of the Washington Catholic Athletic Conference.[7]

History[edit]

Archbishop Carroll High School opened in 1951 and expressed the vision of the Most Reverend Patrick A. O’Boyle, the first Archbishop of the Archdiocese of Washington, who felt strongly that the Catholic Church should lead by example in the area of integration. Named in honor of Archbishop John Carroll, the first Catholic Archbishop in the United States, the school offered a college preparatory education for young women and men, regardless of race or ethnicity. For its first 40 years, the Augustinian Friars operated Archbishop Carroll and, along with lay faculty, taught students in a values-centered curriculum.

In 1989, the Archdiocese of Washington merged several high schools – Archbishop Carroll, All Saints, Mackin, and Holy Spirit – into one school on the Archbishop Carroll site, and, at that point, the school became co-educational.[8] The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme was introduced in 2009.[9] Today, Carroll enrolls 385 students, and it remains as the only high school owned and operated by the Archdiocese of Washington.[10]

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "History – About Us – Archbishop Carroll High School". www.archbishopcarroll.org. Retrieved March 24, 2019.
  2. ^ "Archdiocese of Washington – About Us – Archbishop Carroll High School". www.archbishopcarroll.org. Retrieved March 24, 2019.
  3. ^ a b "Archbishop Carroll High School". National Center for Education Statistics.
  4. ^ "School Profile – About Us – Archbishop Carroll High School". www.archbishopcarroll.org. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  5. ^ "Brookland (Washington, D.C.)". March 6, 2019. Retrieved March 24, 2019 – via Wikipedia.
  6. ^ MSA-CSS. "MSA-Commission on Secondary Schools". Archived from the original on February 12, 2011. Retrieved June 23, 2009.
  7. ^ "High School - Archdiocese of Washington Catholic Schools". Archdiocese of Washington Catholic Schools. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  8. ^ https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/politics/1989/02/03/archdiocese-to-close-3-dc-high-schools/e49d1dc1-df30-4720-a84c-324333a88c51/
  9. ^ "Directory: Archbishop Carroll High School". ibo.org.
  10. ^ "Our Team - Archdiocese of Washington Catholic Schools". Archdiocese of Washington Catholic Schools. Retrieved September 25, 2018.
  11. ^ Loveday, Mike (June 29, 2009). "Loveday: Attaochou transforms himself into a national recruit". ESPN.com. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  12. ^ "2018 Athletic Hall of Fame Enshrinement Ceremony". www.archbishopcarroll.org. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  13. ^ "Michael A. Brown Made All-Met?". Washington City Paper. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  14. ^ a b Huff, Donald (May 22, 1990). "MOTEN OPTS TO PLAY BASKETBALL AT SYRACUSE". Washington Post. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  15. ^ Richards, Chris (October 9, 2005). "Quietly Making Some Noise". Washington Post. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  16. ^ a b C, Marty (March 7, 2013). "Hoover, Thompson, Leftwich and Malloy". Ghosts of DC. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  17. ^ "HoyaReport.com - Carroll Chronicles: A new beginning". georgetown.rivals.com. September 12, 2017. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  18. ^ Himmelsbach, Adam (February 10, 2012). "Eddie Jordan Goes From N.B.A. to High School". The New York Times.
  19. ^ "Kris Joseph - Men's Basketball". Syracuse University Athletics. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  20. ^ Stavenhagen, Cody (January 25, 2015). "FOREVER FIGHTING: Jevon Langford's quest for peace". ocolly.com. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  21. ^ Garvey, Michael O. (August 13, 2009). "Father Malloy tells the first third of his "tale"". Notre Dame News. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  22. ^ Richards, Paul (March 25, 1988). "THE SCULPTURE OF LONGING". Washington Post. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  23. ^ Wiggins, Ovetta (January 21, 2015). "Lt. Gov. Boyd Rutherford couldn't say no when candidate Larry Hogan asked him to join the ticket". Washington Post. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  24. ^ Fritze, John. "Maryland's Michael Steele, once the national Republican Party leader, searches for his place in Trump's GOP". baltimoresun.com. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  25. ^ Evans, Judith (March 21, 2000). "Lacrosse Is Catching in City". The Washington Post. p. D8; DeBonis, Mike (September 20, 2013). "Beverley Wheeler, Robert White seek D.C. Council seats". The Washington Post. Retrieved June 21, 2016.
  26. ^ "Jamal Williams - The Pro Football Archives". www.profootballarchives.com. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  27. ^ "Mike Lonergan", Wikipedia, March 15, 2019, retrieved March 24, 2019
  28. ^ "Washington Catholic Athletic Conference", Wikipedia, March 8, 2019, retrieved March 24, 2019

External links[edit]