Claudia Moscovici

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Claudia Moscovici (born June 12, 1969) is a Romanian-American novelist and art/literary critic.

Claudia Moscovici
Portrait of writer Claudia Moscovici.jpg
Born (1969-06-12) June 12, 1969 (age 49)
Bucharest, Romania
OccupationFiction writer, art critic, literary critic
LanguageRomanian, English, French
NationalityRomanian-American
EducationPh.D. Brown University, A.B. Princeton University
GenreLiterature
Literary movementPostromanticism
Notable worksVelvet Totalitarianism (Intre Doua Lumi) in Romania

Life[edit]

Moscovici was born in Bucharest, Romania. At the age of 12, she immigrated with her family to the United States where she has gone on to obtain a B.A. from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Brown University. Moscovici taught philosophy, literature and arts and ideas at Boston University and at the University of Michigan. Born in Bucharest, Romania, she writes from her experience of life in a totalitarian regime, which marked her deeply.

Works[edit]

Claudia Moscovici is the author of Velvet Totalitarianism (Rowman and Littlefield Publishing, 2009) a novel about a Romanian family’s survival in an oppressive communist regime due to the strength of their love.[1] This novel was republished in translation in her native country, Romania, under the title Intre Doua Lumi (Curtea Veche Publishing, 2011).

In 2002, she co-founded with Mexican sculptor Leonardo Pereznieto the international aesthetic movement called “Postromanticism”,[2] devoted to celebrating beauty, passion and sensuality in contemporary art. She wrote a book on Romanticism and its postromantic survival called Romanticism and Postromanticism, (Lexington Books, 2007) and taught philosophy, literature and arts and ideas at Boston University and at the University of Michigan. Most recently, she published a nonfiction book on psychopathic seduction, called Dangerous Liaisons (Hamilton Books, 2011) and a psychological thriller called The Seducer (forthcoming in March, 2012), which tells the story of a woman lured by a dangerous psychopathic predator.

Books[edit]


This Claudia Moscovici bibliography is a partial list of books written by Romanian-American writer Claudia Moscovici.

Title Publisher Year Genre/Subject Length
(Pages)
Notes ISBN
Dangerous Liaisons: How to Recognize and Escape from Psychopathic SeductionHamilton Books[3]2011Literature230 pages[4]PaperbackISBN 0-7618-5569-6 [4]
What do Scott Peterson, Neil Entwistle and timeless literary seducers epitomized by Don Juan and Casanova have in common? They are charismatic, glib and seductive men who also embody the most dangerous human qualities: a breathtaking callousness, shallowness of emotion and the incapacity to love. In other words, these men are psychopaths. Unfortunately, most psychopaths don’t advertise themselves as heartless social predators. They come across as charming, intelligent, romantic and kind. Through their believable “mask of sanity,” they lure many of us into their dangerous nets. Dangerous Liaisons explains clearly what psychopaths are, why they act the way they do, how they attract us and whom they tend to target. Above all, this book helps victims find the strength to end their toxic relationships with psychopaths and move on, stronger and wiser, with the rest of their lives. 
From Sex Objects to Sexual SubjectsRoutledge[5]1996Social science106 pages[5]PaperbackISBN 0-415-91810-3 [5]
Moscovici brings together the wide-ranging discussion of subjectivity with debates about public discourse. 
Romanticism and PostromanticismLexington Books[6]2007Literary criticism and Francophone Studies123 pages[6]HardcoverISBN 0-7391-1674-6 [6]
Romanticism and Postromanticism undertakes an ambitious project: to argue for the continuing importance of Romanticism in the arts, even after modernism and postmodernism, and to support the idea of the relevance of Romanticism with an examination of a contemporary group of artists who call themselves "postromantic." Relying mainly on Gombrich's notion of there being only Romantic writers and artists (as opposed to "Romanticism") and Abrams' theory of Romanticism as an orientation rather than a unified historical movement, Moscovici sees Romanticism as a general quality that crosses time as well as typical categorizations of artists and writers.[7] 
Romanticism and PostromanticismLexington Books[6]2010Literary criticism and Francophone Studies123 pages (1st Edition)[6]PaperbackISBN 0-7391-1675-4 [6]
Romanticism and Postromanticism undertakes an ambitious project: to argue for the continuing importance of Romanticism in the arts, even after modernism and postmodernism, and to support the idea of the relevance of Romanticism with an examination of a contemporary group of artists who call themselves "postromantic." Relying mainly on Gombrich's notion of there being only Romantic writers and artists (as opposed to "Romanticism") and Abrams' theory of Romanticism as an orientation rather than a unified historical movement, Moscovici sees Romanticism as a general quality that crosses time as well as typical categorizations of artists and writers. 
Velvet Totalitarianism: Post-Stalinist Romania University Press of America[8]2009Novel403 pages[9]PaperbackISBN 0-7618-4693-X [8]
Velvet Totalitarianism, addresses to any reader interested in comparing two political systems of the 80's, before and during the fall of the Iron Curtain: Eastern European totalitarianism and United States democracy. By evoking the drama of family separation and the individual lives of the characters, the author traces the general and the particular experiences of a whole category of people constrained to move between political regimes in order to find answers to the questions of their lives. 
Double Dialectics: Between Universalism and Relativism in Enlightenment and Postmodern ThoughtRowman & Littlefield[10]2002Philosophy169 pages[10]HardcoverISBN 0-7425-1368-8 [10]
Moscovici argues that Enlightenment philosophy has something to add to the contemporary thinking that aspires to subvert it. She grapples with the problem of truth-certainty as discussed by Kant, reformulated by d'Aembert, and critiqued by Lyotard; and examines the intersection between ethics and epistemology in Enlightenment and contemporary discourses. 
Gender and Citizenship: The Dialectics of Subject-Citizenship in Nineteenth-Century French Literature and CultureRowman & Littlefield[11]2000Literature and Francophone Studies131 pages[11]HardcoverISBN 0-8476-9694-4 [11]
Claudia Moscovici proposes a new understanding of how gender relations were reformulated by both male and female writers in nineteenth-century France. 
Gender and Citizenship: The Dialectics of Subject-Citizenship in Nineteenth-Century French Literature and CultureRowman & Littlefield[11]2000Literature and Francophone Studies131 pages[11]PaperbackISBN 0-8476-9695-2 [11]
Claudia Moscovici proposes a new understanding of how gender relations were reformulated by both male and female writers in nineteenth-century France. 
From Sex Objects to Sexual SubjectsRoutledge[5]1996Social science106 pages[5]HardcoverISBN 0-415-91810-3 [5]
Moscovici brings together the wide-ranging discussion of subjectivity with debates about public discourse. 
ErotismsUniversity Press of America[12]1996Literature and Francophone Studies137 pages[12]HardcoverISBN 0-7618-0312-2 [12]
Erotisms analyzes selected representations of women and sexual relations as they influence different aspects of life, including family relations, professional hierarchies, the field of cultural production, and artistic representations. 
ErotismsUniversity Press of America[12]1996Literature and Francophone Studies137 pages[12]PaperbackISBN 0-7618-0313-0 [12]
Erotisms analyzes selected representations of women and sexual relations as they influence different aspects of life, including family relations, professional hierarchies, the field of cultural production, and artistic representations. 

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Invitaţie la lectură" (in Romanian). September 30, 2011. Retrieved 9 December 2011.
  2. ^ "Review: Romanticism and Postromanticism by Claudia Moscovici". 22 July 2011.
  3. ^ "Romanticism and Postromanticism by Claudia Moscovici Book overview". Google Books. Retrieved October 21, 2010.
  4. ^ a b "Dangerous Liaisons: How to Recognize and Escape from Psychopathic Seduction by Claudia Moscovici Book overview". Google Books. Retrieved October 21, 2010.
  5. ^ a b c d e f "From Sex Objects to Sexual Subjects by Claudia Moscovici Book overview". Google Books. Retrieved October 21, 2010.
  6. ^ a b c d e f "Romanticism and Postromanticism by Claudia Moscovici Book overview". Google Books. Retrieved October 21, 2010.
  7. ^ "Romanticism and Postromanticism-review by Sara Pappas Book review". University of Nebraska Press, 2008. Retrieved October 21, 2010.
  8. ^ a b "Velvet Totalitarianism: Post-Stalinist Romania by Claudia Moscovici Book overview". Google Books. Retrieved October 21, 2010.
  9. ^ "Velvet Totalitarianism: Post-Stalinist Romania by Claudia Moscovici Book overview". Google Books. Retrieved October 21, 2010.
  10. ^ a b c "Double Dialectics: Between Universalism and Relativism in Enlightment and Postmodern Thought by Claudia Moscovici Book overview". Google Books. Retrieved October 21, 2010.
  11. ^ a b c d e f "Gender and Citizenship: The Dialectics of Subject-Citizenship in Nineteenth-Century French Literature and Culture by Claudia Moscovici Book overview". Google Books. Retrieved October 21, 2010.
  12. ^ a b c d e f "Erotisms by Claudia Moscovici Book overview". Google Books. Retrieved October 21, 2010.

References[edit]

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