FC Zorya Luhansk

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This article is about football club. For other uses, see Zorya.
Zorya Luhansk
FC Zorya Luhansk.png
Full name Football Club Zorya Luhansk
Founded 1923
Ground Avanhard Stadium
Ground Capacity 22,288
Chairman Yevhen Heller
Head Coach Yuriy Vernydub
League Ukrainian Premier League
2014–15 4th
Website Club home page
Current season

FC Zorya Luhansk (Ukrainian: ФК «Зоря» Луганськ [zo'rʲɑ lu'ɦɑnsʲk]), formerly known as Zorya Voroshilovgrad and Zorya-MALS, is a Ukrainian football team. Zorya Luhansk is based in the city of Luhansk (formerly known as Voroshilovgrad), Luhansk Oblast, Ukraine. However, because of the war in Eastern Ukraine, the team is currently playing its games at Slavutych-Arena in Zaporizhia.

History[edit]

The history of the club takes place at the dawn of the 20th century right after in the city of Luhansk was built the first stadium. The stadium was built in 1922 under the personal order of Vladimir Lenin and later was named after him. The first games that involved participation of the Luhansk's teams first mentioned in 1911 and in 1913 in Kostyantynivka was created the regional football league of Donets basin. During the World War I and the following Soviet and German aggressions the league was suspended until 1920 when the situation in the region had stabilized.

The first Luhansk team was created in the Russian Empire in 1908 when the workers of the Russischen Maschinenbaugesellschaft Hartmann created the "Society of wise recreations". The football section was headed by the Czech specialist Henrich Drževikovski from Prague who was an instructor of gymnastics of the factory's ministerial school. That team played its games and conducted its training on the empty lot near the factory where today is located the sport hall "Zorya".

In 1923 the workers of the Luhansk steam train factory of the October Revolution (hence – the club's logo with a locomotive) organized their football team "Metalist" which became the forerunner of today's Zorya. The following year there was organized a championship of the newly created Luhansk okrug. In the final game the collective city team of Luhansk was victorious against its rival from the city of Snizhne winning it in overtime 1:0. In 1926 the All-Ukrainian Committee of the Mining Workers' council organized a team of Donbass miners that was based on the football players from Kadiyevka for tour games in Germany (Weimar Republic). There the Donbass team won four of their eight games. The following year in Luhansk took place an international game when the city team was challenged by their rivals from Austria. The Donbas players lost the game. In 1936 the football teams "Metalist" and "Dynamo" united into the united Luhansk city team which next year was given the name Dzerzhynets.[1] The name "Dzerzhynets" derives from the steam locomotive that was produced at the steam train factory FD"Felix Dzerzhinsky".[1] That year "Dzerzhynets" got the 3rd place in the Ukrainian second league.

In 1937 "Dzerzhynets" won the 1st place in the Ukrainian second league and was promoted to the Ukrainian first league. Moreover, it reached 1/8 final of the Ukrainian Сup and 1/16 final of the Soviet Cup. The team consisted of the following players: Klad'ko (coach), Grebenyuk, Svidyns'ky, Mazanov, Morozov, Krasyuk, Nosko, Movchan, Brovenko, Chernyavs'ky, Voloschenko, Lokotosh, Sytnikov, Evdokymov, Myroshnikov, Ischenko.

In 1938 "Dzerzhynets" became the champion of Ukraine after having won 9 games and having played 2 games in a draw. It was admitted to the Soviet First League.

In 1972 Zorya did not only win its only Soviet championship, but also represented, re-enforced with only three players from other clubs, the USSR at the Brazilian Independence Cup (Taça Independência) mid-year. However only Volodymyr Onyshchenko represented the club at the Final of the European Football Championship few weeks earlier.

In the season 2005–06 the team won the first place in the Persha Liha, and has been promoted to the Vyscha Liha. Zorya was one of the original twenty teams to debut for the first season of the Ukrainian Premier League. The team played for five seasons until the 1995–96 season in which they finished eighteenth and where sent down to the Persha Liha. Zorya relegated to Druha Liha in 1996–97 season but she returned to Persha Liha in 2003–2004 season.

As Zorya Voroshilovgrad, the club had won the USSR Championship in 1972.

Reserve team[edit]

The reserve team of Zorya, Zorya Luhansk Reserves (Ukrainian: ФК «Зоря» Луганськ дубль) are playing in the Ukrainian Premier Reserve League.

Sponsors[edit]

MediaMix Concept, D & M, Lir, and also Steel Symphony.

Football kits and sponsors[edit]

Years[2] Football kit Shirt sponsor
2006–2007 umbro
2007–2009 puma
2009–2010 dm bank[3]
2010–2011 nike
2011–2014 Holsten

European record[edit]

Its first European competition participation occurred in 1973–74 season in UEFA European Cup as the Soviet representative. Zorya played its first game as Zaria at its home stadium Avanhard (Avangard) on September 19, 1973 hosting the Cypriot club APOEL FC. After that season the club did not participate in continental competitions for over 40 years until 2014–15 season.

Season Competition Round Opponent Home Away Aggregate
1973–74 UEFA European Cup 1R Cyprus APOEL FC 2–0 1–0 3–0
2R Czechoslovakia FC Spartak Trnava 0–1 0–0 0–1
2014–15 UEFA Europa League 2Q Albania KF Laçi 2–1 3–0 5–1
3Q Norway Molde FK 1–1 2–1 3–2
PO Netherlands Feyenoord 1–1 3–4 4–5
2015–16 UEFA Europa League 3Q Belgium Charleroi 3–0 2–0 5–0
PO Poland Legia Warsaw 0–1 2–3 2–4
Notes
  • 1R: First round
  • 2R: Second round
  • 2Q: Second qualifying round
  • 3Q: Third qualifying round
  • PO: Play-off round

Honours[edit]

Domestic competitions[edit]

Soviet competitions[edit]

  • Soviet Top League
    • Cup Winner.png (1): 1972

Ukrainian competitions[edit]

Current squad[edit]

Squad is given according to the club's official site,[4] and composed from players who playing in the main squad team as of 1 September 2015.

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
1 Croatia GK Krševan Santini
3 Belarus DF Mikhail Sivakov
4 Ukraine MF Ihor Chaykovskyi
5 Ukraine DF Artem Hordiyenko
6 Ukraine MF Mykyta Kamenyuka (captain)
8 Ukraine MF Vyacheslav Tankovskyi (on loan from Shakhtar)
9 Ukraine FW Artur Zahorulko (on loan from Shakhtar)
10 Georgia (country) FW Jaba Lipartia
16 Ukraine DF Hryhoriy Yarmash
18 Ukraine MF Ruslan Malinovskyi (on loan from Shakhtar)
20 Ukraine MF Oleksandr Karavayev (on loan from Shakhtar)
22 Serbia MF Željko Ljubenović
23 Ukraine MF Kyrylo Doroshenko
No. Position Player
24 Ukraine MF Dmytro Hrechyshkin (on loan from Shakhtar)
27 Ukraine DF Ihor Kalinin
28 Ukraine FW Pylyp Budkivskyi (on loan from Shakhtar)
29 Ukraine MF Andriy Totovytskyi (on loan from Shakhtar)
30 Ukraine GK Mykyta Shevchenko (on loan from Shakhtar)
34 Ukraine MF Ivan Petryak
36 Ukraine GK Andriy Poltavtsev
39 Ukraine DF Yevhen Opanasenko
44 Ukraine DF Vyacheslav Checher
49 Ukraine FW Dmytro Lukanov
57 Ukraine DF Oleh Boroday
91 Ukraine GK Ihor Levchenko
99 Ukraine DF Andriy Pylyavskyi


Out on loan[edit]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
Ukraine MF Oleksandr Batyschev (on loan to Belshina Bobruisk)
Ukraine MF Mykhaylo Shershen (on loan to Kremin Kremenchuk)
No. Position Player
Ukraine FW Yaroslav Kvasov (on loan to Sillamäe Kalev)

Most capped players[edit]

No. Name Playing period League Cup Europe Total
1 Anatoliy Kuksov 1969-1985 424 89 4 517
2 Yuriy Kolesnikov 1977-1992 (w/breaks) 382 81 0 461
3 Oleksandr Tkachenko 1967-1987 (w/breaks) 370 33 4 407
4 Oleksandr Zhuravlyov 1965-1979 316 34 2 352
5 Oleksandr Malyshenko 1978-1996 318 18 0 336
6 Vitaliy Tarasenko 1982-1990 323 10 0 333
7 Valeriy Galustov 1959-1968 326 4 0 330
8 Viktor Kuznetsov 1968-1979 272 42 4 318
9 Yuriy Yaroshenko 1982-1990 304 11 0 315
10 Serhiy Yarmolych 1984-1996 (w/breaks) 306 5 0 311

Top scoring players[edit]

No. Name Playing period League Cup Europe Total
1 Oleksandr Malyshenko 1978-1996 121 3 0 124
2 Anatoliy Kuksov 1969-1985 89 7 1 97
3 Yuriy Kolesnikov 1977-1992 (w/breaks) 81 7 0 88
4 Timerlan Guseinov 1985-1993 (w/breaks) 66 2 0 68
5 Aleksandr Gulevsky 1957-1961 61 0 0 61
6 Viktor Kuznetsov 1968-1979 40 10 1 51
7 Yuriy Yaroshenko 1982-1990 47 1 0 48
8 Ihor Balaba 1960-1968 42 2 0 44
9 Yuriy Yeliseyev 1970-1977 36 7 0 43
7 Yevgeniy Volchenkov 1961-1964 40 1 0 41

Coaches[edit]

   

Longest serving coaches[edit]

Last Updated after 2014/15 season

No. Name Time period G W D L GS GA Achievement
1 Vadym Dobizha 1980-1988 (w/breaks) 259 114 55 90 358 331 10/24 (1987 Second Division)
2 German Zonin 1962-1972 (w/breaks) 178 77 62 39 241 149 Champion (1972 First Division)
3 Anatoliy Kuksov 1990-1997 (w/breaks) 105 52 18 35 154 117 12/20 (1992 First Division)
4 Yuriy Vernydub 2011- 100 37 30 33 130 128 4/14 (2014/15 First Division)
5 Yuriy Zakharov 1975-1979 (w/breaks) 94 25 30 39 111 143 9/16 (1975 and 1978 First Division)
6 Yuriy Rashchupkin 1982-1983 84 33 20 31 131 119 6/22 (1982 Second Division)
7 Yuriy Koval 2004-2009 (w/breaks) 81 48 18 15 137 55 3/18 (2004/05 Second Division)
8 Anatoly Baidachny 1988-1989 78 34 20 24 119 93 20/22 (1988 Second Division)
9 Yevgeny Goryansky 1966-1967 74 26 27 21 64 58 16/19 (1967 First Division)
10 Alexey Vodyagin 1957-1959 65 29 17 19 95 68 4/14 (1959 Second Division)

League and Cup history[edit]

The statistics is based on information from the club's official website.[5]

Soviet competitions[edit]

Season Div. Pos. Pl. W D L GS GA P Domestic Cup Europe Notes
1986 3rd 2 26 13 8 5 40 26 34 1/64 finals
1 14 12 2 0 29 9 26 Ukrainian Championship, Promoted
1987 2nd 16 42 13 15 14 46 60 38 1/64 finals
1988 2nd 20 42 11 10 21 44 59 32 1/64 finals Relegated
1989 3rd 4 52 27 14 11 94 59 68 1/64 finals Ukrainian Championship
1990 3rd 7 42 20 9 13 72 44 49 1/32 finals
1991 3rd 2 42 26 5 11 69 34 57 1/64 finals

Ukrainian competitions[edit]

Season Div. Pos. Pl. W D L GS GA P Domestic Cup Europe Notes
1992 1st 12 18 6 5 7 23 23 17 1/16 finals 1991-92 Soviet Cup eliminated in 1/32 finals
1992–93 1st 15 30 10 4 16 26 46 24 1/8 finals
1993–94 1st 14 34 10 5 18 24 46 26 1/8 finals
1994–95 1st 16 34 10 5 19 35 70 35 1/16 finals
1995–96 1st 18 34 4 4 26 16 80 16 1/16 finals Relegated
1996–97 2nd 20 42 11 6 25 43 84 39 1/32 finals 2nd Stage
1997–98 2nd 19 46 16 5 25 58 84 53 1/32 finals Relegated
1998–99 3rd "C" 2 26 18 2 6 55 17 56 1/32 finals
1999–00 3rd "C" 3 26 17 2 7 42 21 53 1/8 finals 2nd League Cup
2000–01 3rd "C" 5 30 15 5 10 49 35 50 1/8 finals 2nd League Cup
2001–02 3rd "C" 9 34 15 6 13 61 51 51 Round 1
2002–03 3rd "C" 1 28 23 2 3 62 17 71 1/32 finals Promoted
2003–04 2nd 15 34 8 13 13 28 42 37 1/16 finals
2004–05 2nd 3 34 19 9 6 54 21 66 1/16 finals
2005–06 2nd 1 34 27 6 1 74 13 87 1/32 finals (forfeit) Promoted
2006–07 1st 11 30 9 7 14 23 43 34 1/16 finals
2007–08 1st 11 30 9 4 17 24 43 34 1/16 finals
2008–09 1st 13 30 8 7 15 29 45 31 1/8 finals
2009–10 1st 13 30 7 7 16 23 47 28 1/16 finals
2010–11 1st 12 30 7 9 14 28 40 30 1/4 finals
2011–12 1st 13 30 6 8 16 34 58 26 1/4 finals
2012–13 1st 10 30 10 7 13 32 43 37 1/16 finals
2013–14 1st 7 28 11 9 8 35 30 42 1/16 finals
2014–15 1st 4 26 13 6 7 40 31 42 1/8 finals EL Play-off round
2015–16 1st 1/8 finals EL Play-off round

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Luhansk football at the Our Luhansk football portal.
  2. ^ Jerseys of Ukrainian clubs
  3. ^ "Äèàïàçîí-Ìàêñèìóì Áàíê – Òîï-8 áàíêîâ ñ ðàçäóòûìè àêòèâàìè – Áèçíåñ – Forbes Óêðàèíà". Forbes.ua. Retrieved February 15, 2015. 
  4. ^ "Официальный сайт ФК "Заря" – Луганск". Retrieved February 15, 2015. 
  5. ^ Club's history. Zorya website.

External links[edit]