Fort McMurray-Conklin

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Fort McMurray-Conklin
Alberta electoral district
FortMcMurrayConklin in Alberta.jpg
2010 boundaries
Provincial electoral district
Legislature Legislative Assembly of Alberta
MLA
 
 
 
Brian Jean
Wildrose
District created 2010
First contested 2012
Last contested 2015

Fort McMurray-Conklin is a provincial electoral district in northern Alberta, Canada. The district was created in the 2010 boundary redistribution and is mandated to return a single member to the Legislative Assembly of Alberta using the first past the post voting system.

History[edit]

The electoral district was created in the 2010 Alberta boundary re-distribution. It was created from the electoral district of Fort McMurray-Wood Buffalo which was split in half to accommodate population growth which has occurred in the region over the past decade due to exploitation and development of the oil sands.[1]

Boundary history[edit]

Electoral history[edit]

Assembly Years Member Party
See Fort McMurray-Wood Buffalo 2004-2012
28th 2012–2015     Don Scott Progressive Conservative
29th 2015–present     Brian Jean Wildrose

Election results[edit]

2015 general election[edit]

Alberta general election, 2015
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Wildrose Brian Jean 2,950 43.87 +3.71
New Democratic Ariana Mancini 2,071 30.80 23.05
Progressive Conservative Don Scott 1,497 22.26 −26.69
Liberal Melinda Hollis 207 3.08 0.11
Total valid votes 6,725  
Total rejected ballots    
Turnout      
Eligible voters  

2012 general election[edit]

Alberta general election, 2012
Party Candidate Votes %
Progressive Conservative Don Scott 2,588 48.95
Wildrose Doug Faulkner 2,123 40.16
New Democratic Paul Pomerleau 419 7.93
Liberal Ted Remenda 157 2.97
Total valid votes 5,287 99.17
Total rejected ballots 44 0.83
Turnout 5,331 36.30
Eligible voters 14,686

Senate nominee results[edit]

2012 Senate nominee election district results[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Proposed Electoral Division Areas, Boundaries, and Names for Alberta" (PDF). Alberta Electoral Boundaries Commission. June 2010. p. 20. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 27, 2011. Retrieved January 14, 2012. 
  2. ^ "Bill 28 Electoral Divisions Act" (PDF). Legislative Assembly of Alberta. 2010. 

External links[edit]