Fumie Suguri

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Fumie Suguri
Suguri 08SC by Carmichael.jpg
Suguri at the 2008 Skate Canada.
Personal information
Country represented Japan
Born (1980-12-31) December 31, 1980 (age 35)
Residence Yokohama, Kanagawa Prefecture
Height 1.57 m (5 ft 2 in)
Former coach Noriko Sato, Igor Pashkevitch, Nikolai Morozov, Alexander Zhulin, Nobuo Sato, Nobuko Fukui, Shinji Someya, Oleg Vasiliev
Former choreographer Lori Nichol, Vakhtang Murvanidze, Nikolai Morozov, Alexander Zhulin, David Wilson, Noriko Sato
Skating club Yoshindo
Began skating 1986
ISU personal best scores
Combined total 182.08
2004 GPF
Short program 62.12
2006 Worlds
Free skate 120.06
2004 GPF

Fumie Suguri (村主 章枝 Suguri Fumie?, born December 31, 1980) is a Japanese figure skater. She is a three-time World medalist, a three-time Four Continents champion, the 2003 Grand Prix Final champion, and a five-time Japanese national champion.

Personal life[edit]

Suguri was born in Chiba, Chiba, Japan.[1][2] Her younger sister, Chika, is also a figure skater. Their father was a pilot for JAL and due to his job, the family moved to Anchorage, Alaska when Suguri was three.[3][4] She is bilingual in Japanese and English.[4]

Suguri graduated from Waseda University. She has a degree in social sciences.[4]

In November 2014, Suguri came out as bisexual.[5]

Career[edit]

Suguri began skating at age 5 in Alaska. When she returned to Japan, she began formal training under coach Nobuo Sato, a ten-time Japanese national champion.

In 1994, while visiting the practice rink for the 1994 World Championships, Suguri was taught the triple Lutz jump by Michelle Kwan, who was competing in the event.

1996–97 to 2001–02[edit]

Suguri became Japan's national champion for the first time in 1997. Her second national title came in the 2000–01 season. She went on to win gold at the 2001 Four Continents, becoming the first Japanese woman to win the competition.

In 2001–02, Suguri won her third national title and competed at the 2002 Winter Olympics, where she placed 5th. A month later, she won the bronze medal at the 2002 World Championships behind Michelle Kwan and Irina Slutskaya. Her bronze medal at Worlds was the first medal for a Japanese woman at the World Championships since Yuka Sato won the title in 1994.

2002–03 to 2005–06[edit]

In the 2002–03 season, Suguri won her fourth national title. She was awarded gold at Four Continents and repeated as the bronze medalist at the World Championships, this time behind Kwan and Elena Sokolova.

In 2003–04, Suguri won gold at the NHK Trophy and bronze at Cup of China, thus qualifying for the Grand Prix Final. She stood atop the podium at the Final after defeating Sasha Cohen to become the first Japanese woman to take gold at the competition. Suguri left Sato after the 2004 World Championships after she lost two competitions to Miki Ando, who was also coached by Sato at the time. She moved to Chicago in the United States to train with Oleg Vasiliev in the autumn of 2004.[4]

In the 2004–05 season, Suguri placed fourth at both of her Grand Prix assignments. After placing third at the Japanese Championships, she won her third Four Continents title. She finished fifth at the World Championships. After the Japan Skating Federation refused to let her continue working with Vasiliev, Suguri returned to Sato and soon after Ando left him.

In the 2005–06 season, Suguri won her fifth national title, competing against Mao Asada and Shizuka Arakawa. She placed fourth at the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, Italy, and concluded her season with a silver medal at the 2006 World Championships, having finished second to Kimmie Meissner. She became the first Japanese woman to earn three World Championship medals.

2006–07 to 2009–10[edit]

In the 2006–07 season, Suguri finished fourth at the Japanese championships behind younger competitors Mao Asada, Miki Ando and Yukari Nakano, and missed a spot to the World Championships held in her home country. She competed at the Four Continents Championships but withdrew due to injury after falling on two jumps in her short program. At the end of the season, Suguri left Sato again as she felt overshadowed by Nakano, who was also training with Sato at the time.

For the 2007–08 season, Suguri decided to train in Russia with Alexander Zhulin, who had choreographed her programs in the previous season. Due to Zhulin's marital problems, she had to spend most of her time with Igor Pashkevich. At the Japanese National Championships, Suguri placed third after her short program, but she stumbled in the free program, finishing fourth overall, and, again, she missed a spot on the World Championship team.

During the 2008–09 season, Suguri chose to train with coach Nikolai Morozov in Hackensack, New Jersey. There, she was able to improve her jumping ability. Her first competition of the season was Skate Canada where she placed second behind Joannie Rochette. Her next competition was Cup of Russia, where she led after the short program, then placed third in the free skate, and finished third, overall. At the 2008/2009 Japanese Championships she was 5th after the short program due to a fall on a triple flip. In her long program she landed five triples and scored 121.27 points, winning the long program and placing second overall behind Mao Asada. Suguri made the World team for the first time in three years. She placed 6th at the 2009 Four Continents and 8th at the 2009 World Championships.

Suguri left Morozov in the summer of 2009 to train with Alexei Mishin in Russia, saying she wanted to work on triple/triple combinations and the triple axel. Mishin neglected Suguri and she spent most of her time with Igor Pashkevich. She finished 7th at the 2010 Japanese National Championships.

2010–11 to present[edit]

In March 2011, Suguri stated that she would continue competing the next season, and possibly until 2014.[6] She began working as a regular employee in the Sports Marketing Division at Sunny Side Up and gained a sponsorship at a medical company, Yoshindo.[7]

Suguri was unsuccessful in her effort to reach the 2011–12 Japanese Nationals, finishing 12th in her qualifying competition. She was dealing with an ankle injury.[8] In 2016, she competed in her first adult skating event.[9]

Programs[edit]

Season Short program Free skating Exhibition
2010–11
[1]
2009–10
[10]
2008–09
[11]
  • Fanfan
    by Nicolas Jollere
    choreo. by Nikolai Morozov
2007–08
[12]

2006–07
[13]


2005–06
[14]

2004–05
[15]

2003–04
[16]
2002–03
[17]
2001–02
[18]
2000–01
[19]
1999–2000
1998–99
[3]

1997–98
1996–97
1995–96

Competitive highlights[edit]

GP: Champions Series / Grand Prix

1998–present[edit]

Suguri (left) with the other medalists at 2008 Skate Canada.
International[20]
Event 98–99 99–00 00–01 01–02 02–03 03–04 04–05 05–06 06–07 07–08 08–09 09–10 10–11 11–12 12–13 13–14
Olympics 5th 4th
Worlds 20th 7th 3rd 3rd 7th 5th 2nd 8th
Four Continents 5th 4th 1st 1st 1st WD 10th 6th
GP Final 5th 6th 1st 4th
GP Bofrost Cup 2nd
GP Cup of China 3rd 4th 7th
GP Cup of Russia 5th 3rd
GP Lalique/Bompard 7th 4th 8th
GP NHK Trophy 3rd 8th 5th 7th 4th 1st 2nd 2nd
GP Skate America 4th
GP Skate Canada 2nd 3rd 4th 2nd 4th 8th 2nd 2nd 9th
Goodwill Games 3rd
Finlandia Trophy 7th
Asian Games 3rd 2nd 2nd
National[20]
Japan Champ. 2nd 3rd 1st 1st 1st 2nd 3rd 1st 4th 4th 2nd 7th 7th
Eastern Sect. 12th 11th 11th
WD: Withdrew

Pre-1998[edit]

International[20]
Event 92–93 93–94 94–95 95–96 96–97 97–98
Worlds 18th
GP Cup of Russia 7th
GP NHK Trophy 6th 5th
Nebelhorn Trophy 4th
Asian Games 3rd
International: Junior[20]
Junior Worlds 4th 4th
Blue Swords 3rd J
Gardena 7th J
National[20]
Japan Champ. 4th 1st 2nd
Japan Junior 10th 9th 10th 2nd 2nd
J: Junior level

Detailed results[edit]

2009–2010 season
Date Event SP FS Result
December 25–27, 2009 2009–10 Japan Championships 6
58.70
9
102.59
7
161.29
November 12–15, 2009 2009 Skate America 4
56.04
5
92.95
4
148.99
October 29 – November 1, 2009 2009 Cup of China 6
55.46
8
90.53
7
145.99
October 8–11, 2009 2009 Finlandia Trophy 4
54.09
8
82.82
7
136.91
2008–2009 season
Date Event SP FS Result
March 23–29, 2009 2009 World Championships 9
58.40
9
106.18
8
164.58
February 2–8, 2009 2009 Four Continents Championships 4
60.18
6
107.56
6
167.74
December 25–27, 2008 2008–09 Japan Championships 5
57.32
1
121.27
2
178.59
November 20–23, 2008 2008 Cup of Russia 1
58.30
3
103.74
3
162.04
October 30 – November 2, 2008 2008 Skate Canada International 2
57.92
3
105.94
2
163.86
2007–2008 season
Date Event SP FS Result
February 11–17, 2008 2008 Four Continents Championships 9
50.24
9
94.82
10
145.06
December 26–28, 2007 2007–08 Japan Championships 3
63.50
6
98.29
4
161.79
December 22–25, 2007 2007 Cup of Russia 4
56.18
6
91.97
5
148.15
December 8–11, 2007 2007 Cup of China 11
44.76
3
92.37
4
137.13
2006–2007 season
Date Event SP FS Result
February 7–10, 2007 2007 Four Continents Championships 12
46.09
WD
January 28 – February 4, 2007 2007 Asian Winter Games 1
58.50
3
103.55
2
162.05
December 27–29, 2006 2006–07 Japan Championships 5
58.56
4
114.00
4
172.56
December 14–17, 2006 2006–07 ISU Grand Prix Final 5
55.14
3
103.64
4
158.78
November 30 – December 3, 2006 2006 NHK Trophy 2
61.92
2
117.39
2
179.31
November 2–5, 2006 2006 Skate Canada International 2
58.52
2
110.24
2
168.76
2005–2006 season
Date Event QR SP FS Result
March 19–26, 2006 2006 World Championships 2
28.47
2
62.12
2
119.15
2
209.74
February 10–26, 2006 2006 Winter Olympics 4
61.75
4
113.48
4
175.23
December 23–25, 2005 2005–06 Japan Championships 2
67.30
1
126.86
1
194.16
December 1–4, 2005 2005 NHK Trophy 6
52.60
1
105.88
2
158.48
October 27–30, 2005 2005 Skate Canada International 2
52.12
9
79.88
8
132.00
2004–2005 season
Date Event QR SP FS Result
March 14–20, 2005 2005 World Championships 2
27.19
10
56.28
5
112.54
5
196.01
February 14–20, 2005 2005 Four Continents Championships 1
61.44
1
117.22
1
178.66
December 24–26, 2004 2004–05 Japan Championships 2
65.18
3
101.36
3
166.54
November 19–21, 2004 2004 Trophée Eric Bompard 3
51.40
5
79.90
4
131.30
October 28–31, 2004 2004 Skate Canada International 2
53.72
4
94.60
4
148.32
2003–2004 season
Date Event QR SP FS Result
March 22–28, 2004 2004 World Championships 8 7 5 7
December 25–26, 2003 2003–04 Japan Championships 3 2 2
December 12–14, 2003 2003–04 ISU Grand Prix Final 1
62.02
1
120.06
1
182.08
November 27–30, 2003 2003 NHK Trophy 2
57.94
1
107.58
1
165.52
November 5–9, 2003 2003 Cup of China 1
60.28
5
83.39
3
143.67
2002–2003 season
Date Event QR SP FS Result
March 24–30, 2003 2003 World Championships 1 3 4 3
February 28 – March 2, 2003 2002–03 ISU Grand Prix Final 5 6 6
6
February 10–16, 2003 2003 Four Continents Championships 1 1 1
February 1–8, 2003 2003 Asian Winter Games 2 2 2
December 19–22, 2002 2002–03 Japan Championships 3 1 1
November 28 – December 1, 2002 2002 NHK Trophy 3 4 4
November 7–10, 2002 2002 Bofrost Cup on Ice 1 2 2
October 31 – November 3, 2002 2002 Skate Canada International 2 2 2
2001–2002 season
Date Event QR SP FS Result
March 16–24, 2002 2002 World Championships 3 2 3 3
February 8–24, 2002 2002 Winter Olympics 7 5 5
December 21–23, 2001 2001–02 Japan Championships 1 1 1
November 29 – December 2, 2001 2001 NHK Trophy 6 7 7
November 1–4, 2001 2001 Skate Canada International 3 4 4
2000–2001 season
Date Event QR SP FS Result
March 17–25, 2001 2001 World Championships 5 7 7 7
February 7–10, 2001 2001 Four Continents Championships 2 1 1
December 8–10, 2000 2000–01 Japan Championships 1 1 1
November 28 – December 3, 2000 2000 NHK Trophy 3 5 5
November 1–5, 2000 2000 Skate Canada International 3 3 3
1999–2000 season
Date Event SP FS Result
February 21–27, 2000 2000 Four Continents Championships 4 5 4
December 24–26, 1999 1999–2000 Japan Championships 1 4 3
December 2–5, 1999 1999 NHK Trophy 6 8 8
November 18–21, 1999 1999 Trophée Lalique 5 8 7
1998–1999 season
Date Event QR SP FS Result
March 21–28, 1999 1999 World Championships 6 19 21 20
March 4–7, 1999 1998–99 ISU Grand Prix Final 6 5 5
February 21–28, 1999 1999 Four Continents Championships 5 5 5
January 30 – February 6, 1999 1999 Asian Winter Games 3 3 3
January 15–17, 1999 1998–99 Japan Championships 2 2 2
December 2–6, 1998 1998 NHK Trophy 5 3 3
November 5–8, 1998 1998 Skate Canada International 1 2 2
1997–1998 season
Date Event SP FS Result
December 12–14, 1997 1997–98 Japan Championships 1 2 2
November 27–30, 1997 1997 NHK Trophy 7 5 5
1996–1997 season
Date Event Level QR SP FS Result
March 16–23, 1997 1997 World Championships Senior 10 24 16 18
January 13–15, 1997 1996–97 Japan Championships Senior 3 1 1
December 12–15, 1996 1996 Cup of Russia Senior 4 7 7
December 5–8, 1996 1996 NHK Trophy Senior 5 6 6
November 24 – December 1, 1996 1997 World Junior Championships Junior 3 4 4
November 3, 1996 1996–97 Japan Junior Championships Junior 4 2 2
August 27–30, 1996 1996 Nebelhorn Trophy Senior 4
1995–1996 season
Date Event Level QR SP FS Result
February 4–11, 1996 1996 Asian Winter Games Senior 5
January 12–14, 1996 1995–96 Japan Championships Senior 3 4 4
November 24 – December 1, 1995 1996 World Junior Championships Junior 1 3 4 4
November 3, 1995 1995–96 Japan Junior Championships Junior 2 2 2
October 1995 1995 Blue Swords Junior 3
1992–1995 seasons
Date Event Level SP FS Result
October 2, 1994 1994–95 Japan Junior Championships Junior 7 10 10
March, 1994 1994 Gardena Spring Trophy Junior 7
November, 1993 1993–94 Japan Junior Championships Junior 6 10 9
November, 1992 1992–93 Japan Junior Championships Junior 19 19 19
  • QR = Qualifying round

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Fumie SUGURI: 2010/2011". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on July 17, 2011. 
  2. ^ "トリノ五輪特集 > フィギュアスケート > 選手名鑑 > 村主章枝(すぐり・ふみえ)". Sanspo.com. 
  3. ^ a b Mittan, J. Barry (1999). "Alaskan Trip Leads to Skating Career for Japan's Fumie Suguri". Archived from the original on May 12, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b c d Mittan, Barry (November 21, 2004). "Suguri Moves to Chicago". Skate Today. 
  5. ^ 村主章枝、ジェンダーで悩まない社会へ!「日本はまだ厳しい」「働きかけ頑張る!」 cyclestyle.net on July 16, 2016
  6. ^ Luchianov, Vladislav (March 10, 2011). "Suguri says she'll shoot for Sochi Olympics". IceNetwork.com. Retrieved March 10, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Figure Skating: Fumie Suguri". Sunny Side Up. Archived from the original on June 7, 2012. 
  8. ^ "村主、全日本出場権逃す=フィギュア" [Suguri misses Japan Nationals]. Asahi. November 7, 2011. 
  9. ^ Elfman, Lois (July 7, 2016). "Suguri enters world of competitive adult skating". IceNetwork.com. 
  10. ^ "Fumie SUGURI: 2009/2010". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on November 2, 2009. 
  11. ^ "Fumie SUGURI: 2008/2009". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on June 28, 2009. 
  12. ^ "Fumie SUGURI: 2007/2008". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 14, 2008. 
  13. ^ "Fumie SUGURI: 2006/2007". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on August 12, 2007. 
  14. ^ "Fumie SUGURI: 2005/2006". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on April 25, 2006. 
  15. ^ "Fumie SUGURI: 2004/2005". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on April 3, 2005. 
  16. ^ "Fumie SUGURI: 2003/2004". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on June 3, 2004. 
  17. ^ "Fumie SUGURI: 2002/2003". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on June 5, 2003. 
  18. ^ "Fumie SUGURI: 2001/2002". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on June 2, 2002. 
  19. ^ "Fumie SUGURI: 2000/2001". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on April 19, 2001. 
  20. ^ a b c d e "Competition Results: Fumie SUGURI". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on April 29, 2016. 

External links[edit]