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Laureus World Sports Awards

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Laureus World Sports Awards
Laureus World Sports Awards statuette.jpg
Cartier statuette presented to each winner
Awarded for men and women from the world of sport along with their achievements from the previous calendar year
Country Monaco Monaco (2018)[1]
Presented by Laureus Sport for Good Foundation
Hosted by Benedict Cumberbatch (2018)[2]
Most awards Switzerland Roger Federer (6)
Website Official website

The Laureus World Sports Awards is an annual award ceremony honouring individuals and teams from the world of sports along with sporting achievements throughout the year. It was established in 1999 by Laureus Sport for Good Foundation founding patrons Daimler and Richemont and supported by its global partners Mercedes-Benz and IWC Schaffhausen. The awards support the work of Laureus Sport for Good, which supports over 100 community projects in around 40 countries. These projects aim to use the power of sport to end violence, discrimination and disadvantage, and prove that sport has the power to change the world. The name "Laureus" is derived from the Greek word for laurel, considered a traditional symbol of victory in athletics.

The first ceremony was held on 25 May 2000 in Monte Carlo at which Nelson Mandela gave the keynote speech. As of 2018, awards are made annually in eight categories, with a number of discretionary categories irregularly recognised. The recipient of each award is presented with a Laureus statuette, created by Cartier, at an annual ceremony held in various locations around the world. As of 2018, the ceremonies have been held in eleven cities around the world, and are broadcast in at least 160 countries.

Swiss tennis player Roger Federer holds the record for the most awards with six. A number of awards have been rescinded, namely those presented to American cyclist Lance Armstrong, American sprinter Marion Jones and Canadian amputee sprinter Earle Connor, all of whom were subsequently found to have doped.

History[edit]

Sport has the power to change the world. It has the power to inspire. It has the power to unite people in a way that little else does. It speaks to youth in a language they understand. Sport can create hope, where once there was only despair.

Nelson Mandela, 2000[3]

South African businessman Johann Rupert, chairman of Richemont, proposed that an organisation be created "based on the principle that sport can bridge the gaps in society and change the way people look at the world."[4] The organisation, established in 1998 by a partnership of Richemont and Daimler became known as "Laureus", its name being derived from the Greek word for laurel, considered a traditional symbol of victory in athletics.[5] The first Laureus World Sports Awards ceremony was held two years later, at which the patron, Nelson Mandela, delivered a speech which Edwin Moses has described as "iconic".[6]

Awards were made in seven regular categories and two discretionary categories at the inaugural ceremony, hosted by the American actors Jeff Bridges and Dylan McDermott.[7] Two of those awards would later be rescinded: both the American cyclist Lance Armstrong and the American track athlete Marion Jones were found to have used performance-enhancing drugs and had their accolades removed.[8] The American amputee sprinter Earle Connor's Laureus World Sportsperson of the Year with a Disability Award, which he won in 2004, was also later rescinded.[9]

The awards are considered highly prestigious and are frequently referred to as the sporting equivalent of an "Oscar".[10][11][12] Despite this, the awards have come in for some criticism, particularly in the manner in which athletes are selected for inclusion.[13]

Categories[edit]

In order to determine the winners of the Awards, the Laureus Nominations Panel, composed of professional sports editors, writers and broadcasters from more than 100 countries, vote to create a shortlist of six nominations in five categories:[14]

The nominees of two categories are chosen by specialist panels:

The Laureus World Sports Academy is an association of 65 retired sportspeople who volunteer their time to support the work of the Laureus Sport for Good Foundation. They also vote each year to decide the winners of the Laureus World Sports Awards. As of 2018, the chairman of the Academy is New Zealand former rugby player Sean Fitzpatrick.[15] The members of the Academy select the winners by voting in a secret ballot.[16]

One category is voted for by the public:[17]

  • The Laureus Best Sporting Moment of the Year

The Academy also makes discretionary awards, including:[17]

Ceremony[edit]

The Laureus World Sports Awards ceremony is held annually at various venues in various locations around the world. The inaugural ceremony took place at the Sporting Club in Monaco on 25 May 2000.[18] As of 2018, the ceremonies have been held in eleven cities around the world, and are broadcast in at least 160 countries.[19] Each Laureus World Sports Award winner receives a Cartier Laureus statuette which features a "representation of the striving human form".[19] The award weighs approximately 2.5 kilograms (5.5 lb) (with 670 grams (24 oz) of solid silver and a 650-gram (23 oz) gold-finish base) and is 30 centimetres (12 in) tall.[19]

The ceremony has been held at the Grimaldi Forum in Monaco on three occasions.
The 2015 ceremony took place at the Shanghai Grand Theatre, China.
Locations of Laureus World Sports Awards ceremonies
Year Location Venue Notes Ref(s)
2000 Monaco Monaco Sporting Club Patron was Nelson Mandela [7][20]
2001 Grimaldi Forum Patron was Prince Albert [21][22]
2002 [23][24]
2003 [25]
2004 Portugal Lisbon, Portugal Cultural Centre of Belém Patron was José Manuel Barroso [26][27]
2005 Portugal Estoril, Portugal Casino Estoril [28]
2006 Spain Barcelona, Spain Parque del Fórum [29]
2007 Palau Sant Jordi Patron was Juan Carlos I of Spain [30]
2008 Russia Saint Petersburg, Russia Mariinsky Theatre Attended by President Vladimir Putin [31]
2009 Ceremony cancelled due to world economic crisis; awards presented to winners individually at other events from May to June. [32]
2010 United Arab Emirates Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Emirates Palace [33]
2011 [34]
2012 United Kingdom London, United Kingdom Central Hall Westminster [35]
2013 Brazil Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Theatro Municipal [36]
2014 Malaysia Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Istana Budaya [37]
2015 China Shanghai, China Shanghai Grand Theatre [38]
2016 Germany Berlin, Germany Palais am Funkturm [39]
2017 Monaco Monaco Sporting Club [40]
2018 [1]

Winners by category[edit]

Serena Williams
Roger Federer
Serena Williams (four) and Roger Federer (five) have the most Sportswoman and Sportsmen of the Year awards.[41][42]
Daniel Dias has won the Sportsperson with a Disability of the Year Award three times.[43]

Regular awards[edit]

Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year[edit]

Team of the Year[edit]

Breakthrough of the Year[edit]

Prior to 2007, this award was called Newcomer of the Year.[44][45]

Comeback of the Year[edit]

Sportsperson with a Disability of the Year[edit]

Action Sportsperson of the Year[edit]

Prior to 2007, this award was called Alternative Sportsperson of the Year.[44][45]

Best Sporting Moment[edit]

The Best Sporting Moment Award, inaugurated in 2017, and voted for by the public, was won by the FC Barcelona under-12 (Infantil-B) side for their sportsmanship in consoling a defeated opposition team.[46] The 2018 award was won by fans of the Iowa Hawkeyes football team, who at the end of the first quarter of each home game turn toward the children's hospital that overlooks the playing field and wave to patients watching the game.[47][48]

Discretionary awards[edit]

Since 2000, the Laureus World Sports Awards have included a number of accolades given by the Academy at their discretion. At the first ceremony in 2000, Brazilian footballer Pelé became the first recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award, while American Eunice Kennedy Shriver, founder of the Special Olympics was presented with the inaugural Laureus Sport for Good Award.[8] The first Spirit of Sport award was presented in 2005 to the Boston Red Sox who had won the World Series for the first time in 86 years.[49] In 2013, American swimmer Michael Phelps became the first recipient of the Exceptional Achievement Award. As of 2018, Chinese tennis player Li Na (2015) and Italian footballer Francesco Totti (2018) are the only other people to be honoured with the award.[47][50] In 2017, the Refugee Olympic Team, comprising ten athletes from Syria, Congo, Ethiopia and South Sudan, was awarded the first Sporting Inspiration Award.[51] The following year, the award was presented to the American footballer J. J. Watt whose "exceptional humanitarian efforts" raised more than $37 million for those impacted by Hurricane Harvey.[52]

Winners by year[edit]

Regular awards[edit]

Key
* Indicates individual whose award or nomination was later rescinded
N/A Not awarded
Year Sportsman Sportswoman Team Breakthrough Comeback Disability Action Moment Ref
2000 Tiger Woods Marion Jones* Manchester United F.C. Sergio García Lance Armstrong* Louise Sauvage Shaun Palmer N/A [8]
2001 Tiger Woods Cathy Freeman France national football team Marat Safin Jennifer Capriati Vinny Lauwers Mike Horn N/A [53]
2002 Michael Schumacher Jennifer Capriati Australia national cricket team Juan Pablo Montoya Goran Ivanišević Esther Vergeer Bob Burnquist N/A [54]
2003 Lance Armstrong* Serena Williams Brazil national football team Yao Ming Ronaldo Michael Milton Dean Potter N/A [55]
2004 Michael Schumacher Annika Sörenstam England national rugby union team Michelle Wie Hermann Maier Earle Connor* Layne Beachley N/A [9]
2005 Roger Federer Kelly Holmes Greece national football team Liu Xiang Alex Zanardi Chantal Petitclerc Ellen MacArthur N/A [56]
2006 Roger Federer Janica Kostelić Renault F1 team Rafael Nadal Martina Hingis Ernst van Dyk Angelo d'Arrigo N/A [44]
2007 Roger Federer Yelena Isinbayeva Italy national football team Amélie Mauresmo Serena Williams Martin Braxenthaler Kelly Slater N/A [45]
2008 Roger Federer Justine Henin South Africa national rugby union team Lewis Hamilton Paula Radcliffe Esther Vergeer Shaun White N/A [57]
2009 Usain Bolt Yelena Isinbayeva China Olympic team Rebecca Adlington Vitali Klitschko Daniel Dias Kelly Slater N/A [58]
2010 Usain Bolt Serena Williams Brawn F1 team Jenson Button Kim Clijsters Natalie du Toit Stephanie Gilmore N/A [59]
2011 Rafael Nadal Lindsey Vonn Spain national football team Martin Kaymer Valentino Rossi Verena Bentele Kelly Slater N/A [60]
2012 Novak Djokovic Vivian Cheruiyot FC Barcelona Rory McIlroy Darren Clarke Oscar Pistorius Kelly Slater N/A [61]
2013 Usain Bolt Jessica Ennis European Ryder Cup team Andy Murray Félix Sánchez Daniel Dias Felix Baumgartner N/A [62]
2014 Sebastian Vettel Missy Franklin FC Bayern Munich Marc Márquez Rafael Nadal Marie Bochet Jamie Bestwick N/A [63]
2015 Novak Djokovic Genzebe Dibaba Germany national football team Daniel Ricciardo Schalk Burger Tatyana McFadden Alan Eustace N/A [64]
2016 Novak Djokovic Serena Williams New Zealand national rugby union team Jordan Spieth Dan Carter Daniel Dias Jan Frodeno N/A [65]
2017 Usain Bolt Simone Biles Chicago Cubs Nico Rosberg Michael Phelps Beatrice Vio Rachel Atherton FC Barcelona under-12s [66]
2018 Roger Federer Serena Williams Mercedes F1 Team Sergio García Roger Federer Marcel Hug Armel Le Cléac’h Iowa Hawkeyes [47]

Discretionary awards[edit]

Key
dagger Indicates posthumous award
N/A Not awarded
Year Lifetime Sport for Good Spirit of Sport Exceptional Achievement Sporting Inspiration Ref
2000 Pelé Eunice Kennedy Shriver N/A N/A N/A [8]
2001 Steve Redgrave Kip Keino N/A N/A N/A [53]
2002 Peter Blake dagger Peter Blake dagger N/A N/A N/A [54]
2003 Gary Player Arnold Schwarzenegger N/A N/A N/A [55]
2004 Arne Næss Jr. dagger Mathare Youth Sports Association N/A N/A N/A [9]
India national cricket team
Pakistan national cricket team
[9]
2005 N/A Gerry Storey Boston Red Sox N/A N/A [56]
2006 Johan Cruyff Jürgen Griesbeck Valentino Rossi N/A N/A [44]
2007 Franz Beckenbauer Luke Dowdney FC Barcelona N/A N/A [45]
2008 Sergey Bubka Brendan and Sean Tuohy Dick Pound N/A N/A [57]
2009 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A [58]
2010 Nawal El Moutawakel Dikembe Mutombo N/A N/A N/A [59]
2011 Zinedine Zidane May El-Khalil European Ryder Cup team N/A N/A [60]
2012 Bobby Charlton Raí N/A N/A N/A [61]
2013 Sebastian Coe N/A N/A Michael Phelps N/A [62]
2014 N/A Magic Bus Afghanistan national cricket team N/A N/A [63]
2015 N/A Skateistan Yao Ming Li Na N/A [64]
2016 Niki Lauda Moving the Goalposts Johan Cruyff dagger N/A N/A [65]
2017 N/A Waves for Change Leicester City F.C. N/A Refugee Olympic Team [66]
2018 Edwin Moses Active Communities Network N/A Francesco Totti J. J. Watt [47]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]