Lego Indiana Jones 2: The Adventure Continues

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Lego Indiana Jones 2: The Adventure Continues
Lego Indiana Jones 2 The Adventure Continues Game Cover.jpg
Developer(s) Traveller's Tales
Feral Interactive, Open Planet Software (Mac OS X) [1]
Publisher(s) LucasArts
Feral Interactive (Mac OS X)
Series Lego Indiana Jones
Engine Lego Star Wars III: The Clone Wars
Platform(s) Wii
Xbox 360
PlayStation 3
Nintendo DS
PlayStation Portable
Mac OS X
Microsoft Windows
PlayStation 2 (cancelled)
Release date(s) Wii, Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Nintendo DS, PlayStation Portable, Microsoft Windows
  • NA November 17, 2009 [2]
  • AUS November 25, 2009

Mac OS X

  • NA April 2, 2011
Genre(s) Action-adventure
Mode(s) Single-player, Multiplayer

Lego Indiana Jones 2: The Adventure Continues is a 2009 video game developed by Traveller's Tales and published by LucasArts. It is the sequel to the 2008 game, Lego Indiana Jones: The Original Adventures. The game allows gamers to play all four cinematic adventures,[5] including the latest film in the franchise, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, which was not included in the previous game. Despite being tagged as a sequel, the game contains newly designed levels for all four movies. The game is available on the Wii, Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Nintendo DS, PlayStation Portable, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows.[6][7] The Mac OS X version of the game was released on April 28, 2011 by Feral Interactive.[1] A PlayStation 2 version of the game was planned, but later cancelled for unknown reasons and was scrapped along with Lego Harry Potter: Years 1-4.


Lego Indiana Jones 2:The Adventure Continues lets the player control a Lego figure in areas related to movie scenes and situations. Each movie is broken down into five levels, with the exception of Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, which was divided into three five level parts. The movies would also include a level that would have the player defeat a certain number of various enemies to complete the level. The vehicle levels involved the player using their vehicle to destroy enemy vehicles. The last level of each movie would consist of a major boss battle, where the player would need to defeat the movies' main antagonist. Console versions of Lego Indiana Jones 2 include a level creator where players can create their own levels and objects. Two-player co-op mode has been enhanced with split-screen; rather than forcing both characters to always be close enough to fit on the same screen, the game will seamlessly split when characters wander apart and merge into one screen when both players are near each other. The hub has also been redesigned; where before each hub was a small area with easy access to levels which had been unlocked, now each hub is a large area in which entrances to levels must be discovered.

This game has trophy support on the PlayStation 3 version and on November 23, 2009, LucasArts revealed on Twitter that it is working on a patch for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 versions of the game which will enable online co-op gameplay.[8]


The game starts in Kingdom of the Crystal Skull Part 1. There are 6 hubs in the game in total, with 5 story mode levels in each hub, 5 treasure mode levels, 5 bonus levels, and 1 super bonus level (these are unlocked by completing treasure mode and bonus levels).


The game generally received mixed reviews. GameTrailers gave the game a score of 7.0, citing it as more repetitive than previous titles and criticizing a lack of online features to complement the co-op and level editor modes. They also criticized the fact that half the game was based on 'the worst movie in the series.'[9] However, GameSpot suggests that the "roll-your-eyes nature of the film" finds a much better fit in the Lego game adaptation, giving the game an 8.0 overall.[10] IGN gave the game 6.0, citing the lack of secrets in the main levels as well as the new hub worlds being a mess, but praised the soundtrack and lasting appeal.[11] Kotaku, however, says the game delivers on many levels and recommends it over the first game. It is also criticized for not staying onto the details of the movies, a feature that was present in its predecessor.[12] As of May 2012, the game has sold over 4 million copies worldwide.


External links[edit]