List of French Open men's singles champions

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French Open Men's Singles Champions
Location Paris[a]
France
Venue Stade Roland Garros
Governing body Fédération Française de Tennis (FFT)
Created 1891 (established)
1925 (international)
Editions Tournaments Staged: (121 editions)
Open Era: 1968 (50 editions)
Surface Alternate between sand and clay (1891–1907)
Clay (red) (1908–present)
Trophy Coupe des Mousquetaires
Website www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/about/history/winners.html
Most titles
11: Rafael Nadal
Current champion
Rafael Nadal
(Eleventh title)

The French Open is an annual tennis tournament held over two weeks in May and June. Established in 1891 and played since 1928 on outdoor red clay courts at the Stade Roland Garros in Paris, France,[1] the French Open is one of the four Grand Slam tournaments played each year, the other three being the Australian Open, Wimbledon and the US Open. Organised by the Fédération Française de Tennis (FFT), the French Open is the second of the four Grand Slam tournaments of the year to be played.[2]

The winner of the men's singles event receives the Coupe des Mousquetaires, named after The Four Musketeers of French tennis: Jean Borotra, Jacques Brugnon, Henri Cochet, and René Lacoste.[3] The event was not held from 1915 to 1919 because of the First World War and was held unofficially under German occupation from 1941 to 1944, during the Second World War.[4]

Rafael Nadal has won the most French Open titles, with eleven, and also holds the record for the most consecutive wins in the Open Era, with five from 2010 to 2014.[5] Max Decugis won the most titles before the Open era, with eight.[6] Michael Chang became the youngest player to win the French Open when he took the title in 1989 at 17 years, 3 months and 20 days. In contrast, André Vacherot is the oldest champion, having won in 1901 at 40 years old. In the Open era, this record belongs to Andrés Gimeno, who was 34 years and 9 months old when he won in 1972.[7] French players have won the most French Open men's singles titles, with 38 victories, followed by Spanish (18) and Australian players (11). The current champion is Rafael Nadal who beat Dominic Thiem in the 2018 final to win his eleventh French Open title.

History[edit]

Rafael Nadal at the 2011 French Open
Rafael Nadal, who has won an all-time record eleven French Open titles. Nadal won four consecutive titles from 2005 - 2008 and an open era record of five consecutive titles from 2010 - 2014.

The French Open was established in 1891 and was originally known as the French Championships. The tournament was only open to French players or foreign players who were a member of a French club during the first 34 years of its existence.[8] The first winner of the Championship was the British player H. Briggs, a member of Club Stade Français which entitled him to compete.[9] Records show matches were played as the best-of-three sets format until 1902 or 1903, when best-of-five sets was adopted. French players were dominant in the early stages of the tournament, in particular Max Decugis, who won eight titles before the outbreak of the First World War.[10] Between 1924 and 1932 the title was won by a member of The Four Musketeers. The championship started to attract the best players after it became an international event in 1925, which was won by René Lacoste. France's victory in the 1927 Davis Cup increased interest in the tournament and required a new stadium to be built. Previously the tournament had alternated between Racing Club and La Faisanderie, before the Stade Roland Garros was built in 1928.[11] Henri Cochet won the first tournament at the new venue.[12]

Jack Crawford's victory in 1933 was the first time a foreign player had won the tournament since 1891. Following his victory, no French players won the title up until 1940, when the tournament was suspended following the outbreak of the Second World War. Don Budge's victory in 1938 was notable, as he won all of the Grand Slam tournaments during the year.[13] Though the event was suspended in 1940, it was held unofficially under the guise of the Tournoi de France. Bernard Destremau won the first two events, while Yvon Petra won three from 1942 to 1945. These results are not recognised by the FFT or other major international organisations and are considered unofficial.[4] Marcel Bernard won the first event after the end of the war in 1946; he was the only Frenchman to win the event before the advent of the Open era in 1968.[10]

No one player dominated the event during this period. Only five players, Frank Parker, Jaroslav Drobný, Tony Trabert, Nicola Pietrangeli and Roy Emerson, won multiple titles.[10] The tournament became an Open in 1968, as professional players were allowed to compete with amateurs, previously only amateurs could compete in the Grand Slam tournaments.[14] The tournament, won by Australian Ken Rosewall, was the first Grand Slam tournament to be played in the Open era.[15]

Swede Björn Borg won the majority of the tournaments in the early years of the Open era. He won consecutive titles in 1974 and 1975, before winning four successive titles from 1978 to 1981.[16] Yannick Noah became the first Frenchman to win the event since 1946, when he won in 1983.[17] Ivan Lendl won his first title in 1984, before losing the following year to Wilander in the final and won two consecutive titles in 1986 and 1987.[16] Michael Chang became the youngest man to win the French Open when he beat Stefan Edberg in 1989.[18]

American Jim Courier won consecutive titles in 1991 and 1992 before Spaniard Sergi Bruguera repeated the feat in 1993 and 1994.[19][20] Gustavo Kuerten won three titles in 1997, 2000 and 2001.[16] 2005 marked Rafael Nadal's first French Open; he won four consecutive titles from 2005 to 2008.[21] Nadal was beaten in the round of 16 of the 2009 tournament by Robin Söderling who lost to Roger Federer in the final.[22] Nadal regained the title in 2010 and defended his crowns in 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014. In the 2015 event, he was knocked out in the quarter-finals by Novak Djokovic, who eventually lost in the final to Stan Wawrinka.[23]

Champions[edit]

Regular competition
Not considered to be a Grand Slam event. A French club members only tournament called the French Championships †
Disputed champions: Not considered to be a Grand Slam event. Not sanctioned or recognised by the FFT ††[f][24]
See Tournoi de France

French Championships[edit]

A man in white pants and a white shirt steps back, holding a wooden racket in his right hand
Henri Cochet took five titles in Paris.
Year[c] Country Champion Country Runner-up Score in the final
1891  BRI[i] H. Briggs †  FRA P. Baigneres 6–3, 6–4[d]
1892  FRA Jean Schopfer †  USA Francis L. Fassitt 6–2, 1–6, 6–2
1893  FRA Laurent Riboulet †  FRA Jean Schopfer 6–3, 6–3
1894  FRA André Vacherot †  FRA Gérard Brosselin 1–6, 6–3, 6–3
1895  FRA André Vacherot †  FRA Laurent Riboulet 9–7, 6–2
1896  FRA André Vacherot †  FRA Gérard Brosselin 6–1, 7–5
1897  FRA Paul Aymé †  BRI Francky Wardan 4–6, 6–4, 6–2
1898  FRA Paul Aymé †  FRA Paul Lebreton 5–7, 6–1, 6–2
1899  FRA Paul Aymé †  FRA Paul Lebreton 9–7, 3–6, 6–3
1900  FRA Paul Aymé †  FRA André Prévost 6–3, 6–0
1901  FRA André Vacherot †  FRA Paul Lebreton
1902  FRA Michel Vacherot †  FRA Max Decugis 6–4, 6–2
1903  FRA Max Decugis †  FRA André Vacherot 6–3, 6–2
1904  FRA Max Decugis †  FRA André Vacherot 6–1, 9–7, 6–8, 6–1
1905  FRA Maurice Germot †  FRA André Vacherot
1906  FRA Maurice Germot †  FRA Max Decugis 5–7, 6–3, 6–4, 1–6, 6–3
1907  FRA Max Decugis †  FRA Robert Wallet
1908  FRA Max Decugis †  FRA Maurice Germot 6–2, 6–1, 3–6, 10–8
1909  FRA Max Decugis †  FRA Maurice Germot 3–6, 2–6, 6–4, 6–4, 6–4
1910  FRA Maurice Germot †  FRA François Blanchy 6–1, 6–3, 4–6, 6–3
1911  FRA André Gobert †  FRA Maurice Germot 6–1, 8–6, 7–5
1912  FRA Max Decugis †  FRA André Gobert
1913  FRA Max Decugis †  FRA Georges Gault
1914  FRA Max Decugis †  FRA Jean Samazeuilh 3–6, 6–1, 6–4, 6–4[25][d]
1915 No competition (due to World War I)[b]
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920  FRA André Gobert †  FRA Max Decugis 6–3, 3–6, 1–6, 6–2, 6–3
1921  FRA Jean Samazeuilh †  FRA André Gobert 6–3, 6–3, 2–6, 7–5
1922  FRA Henri Cochet †  FRA Jean Samazeuilh 8–6, 6–3, 7–5
1923  FRA François Blanchy †  FRA Max Decugis 1–6, 6–2, 6–0, 6–2
1924  FRA Jean Borotra †  FRA René Lacoste 7–5, 6–4, 0–6, 5–7, 6–2
1925  FRA René Lacoste  FRA Jean Borotra 7–5, 6–1, 6–4 [25]
1926  FRA Henri Cochet  FRA René Lacoste 6–2, 6–4, 6–3
1927  FRA René Lacoste  USA William Tilden 6–4, 4–6, 5–7, 6–3, 11–9
1928  FRA Henri Cochet  FRA René Lacoste 5–7, 6–3, 6–1, 6–3
1929  FRA René Lacoste  FRA Jean Borotra 6–3, 2–6, 6–0, 2–6, 8–6
1930  FRA Henri Cochet  USA William Tilden 3–6, 8–6, 6–3, 6–1
1931  FRA Jean Borotra  FRA Christian Boussus 2–6, 6–4, 7–5, 6–4
1932  FRA Henri Cochet  ITA Giorgio de Stefani 6–0, 6–4, 4–6, 6–3
1933  AUS Jack Crawford  FRA Henri Cochet 8–6, 6–1, 6–3
1934  GER Gottfried von Cramm  AUS Jack Crawford 6–4, 7–9, 3–6, 7–5, 6–3
1935  GBR Fred Perry  GER Gottfried von Cramm 6–3, 3–6, 6–1, 6–3
1936  GER Gottfried von Cramm  GBR Fred Perry 6–0, 2–6, 6–2, 2–6, 6–0
1937  GER Henner Henkel  GBR Bunny Austin 6–1, 6–4, 6–3
1938  USA Donald Budge  TCH Roderich Menzel 6–3, 6–2, 6–4
1939  USA Donald McNeill  USA Bobby Riggs 7–5, 6–0, 6–3
1940 No competition (due to World War II)[f]
1941[f]  FRA Bernard Destremau ††  FRA Robert Ramillon 6–4, 2–6, 6–3, 6–4
1942  FRA Bernard Destremau ††  FRA Marcel Bernard
1943  FRA Yvon Petra ††  FRA Henri Cochet
1944  FRA Yvon Petra ††  FRA Henri Cochet
1945  FRA Yvon Petra ††  FRA Bernard Destremau 7–5, 6–4, 6–2
1946  FRA Marcel Bernard  TCH Jaroslav Drobný 3–6, 2–6, 6–1, 6–4, 6–3
1947  HUN József Asbóth  RSA Eric Sturgess 8–6, 7–5, 6–4
1948  USA Frank Parker  TCH Jaroslav Drobný 6–4, 7–5, 5–7, 8–6
1949  USA Frank Parker  USA Budge Patty 6–3, 1–6, 6–1, 6–4
1950  USA Budge Patty  EGY Jaroslav Drobný 6–1, 6–2, 3–6, 5–7, 7–5
1951  EGY Jaroslav Drobný  RSA Eric Sturgess 6–3, 6–3, 6–3
1952  EGY Jaroslav Drobný  AUS Frank Sedgman 6–2, 6–0, 3–6, 6–4
1953  AUS Ken Rosewall  USA Vic Seixas 6–3, 6–4, 1–6, 6–2
1954  USA Tony Trabert  USA Arthur Larsen 6–4, 7–5, 6–1
1955  USA Tony Trabert  SWE Sven Davidson 2–6, 6–1, 6–4, 6–2
1956  AUS Lew Hoad  SWE Sven Davidson 6–4, 8–6, 6–3
1957  SWE Sven Davidson  USA Herbert Flam 6–3, 6–4, 6–4
1958  AUS Mervyn Rose  CHI Luis Ayala 6–3, 6–4, 6–4
1959  ITA Nicola Pietrangeli  RSA Ian Vermaak 3–6, 6–3, 6–4, 6–1
1960  ITA Nicola Pietrangeli  CHI Luis Ayala 3–6, 6–3, 6–4, 4–6, 6–3
1961  ESP Manuel Santana  ITA Nicola Pietrangeli 4–6, 6–1, 3–6, 6–0, 6–2
1962  AUS Rod Laver  AUS Roy Emerson 3–6, 2–6, 6–3, 9–7, 6–2
1963  AUS Roy Emerson  FRA Pierre Darmon 3–6, 6–1, 6–4, 6–4
1964  ESP Manuel Santana  ITA Nicola Pietrangeli 6–3, 6–1, 4–6, 7–5
1965  AUS Fred Stolle  AUS Tony Roche 3–6, 6–0, 6–2, 6–3
1966  AUS Tony Roche  HUN István Gulyás 6–1, 6–4, 7–5
1967  AUS Roy Emerson  AUS Tony Roche 6–1, 6–4, 2–6, 6–2

French Open[edit]

A brown-haired man in a white polo shirt
Björn Borg won six titles and won four straight from 1978 to 1981.
Rafael Nadal at the 2008 French Open
Rafael Nadal took four straight titles from 2005 to 2008, another five straight titles from 2010 to 2014, and another two in 2017 and 2018, making it eleven titles in all. Nadal has a 86–2 win-loss record at the event.[27]
Year[c] Country Champion Country Runner-up Score in the final
1968  AUS Ken Rosewall  AUS Rod Laver 6–3, 6–1, 2–6, 6–2
1969  AUS Rod Laver  AUS Ken Rosewall 6–4, 6–3, 6–4
1970  TCH Jan Kodeš  YUG Željko Franulović 6–2, 6–4, 6–0
1971  TCH Jan Kodeš  ROU Ilie Năstase 8–6, 6–2, 2–6, 7–5
1972  ESP Andrés Gimeno  FRA Patrick Proisy 4–6, 6–3, 6–1, 6–1
1973  ROU Ilie Năstase  YUG Nikola Pilić 6–3, 6–3, 6–0
1974  SWE Björn Borg  ESP Manuel Orantes 2–6, 6–7(4–7)[g], 6–0, 6–1, 6–1
1975  SWE Björn Borg  ARG Guillermo Vilas 6–2, 6–3, 6–4
1976  ITA Adriano Panatta  USA Harold Solomon 6–1, 6–4, 4–6, 7–6(7–3)
1977  ARG Guillermo Vilas  USA Brian Gottfried 6–0, 6–3, 6–0
1978  SWE Björn Borg  ARG Guillermo Vilas 6–1, 6–1, 6–3
1979  SWE Björn Borg  PAR Víctor Pecci 6–3, 6–1, 6–7(6–8), 6–4
1980  SWE Björn Borg  USA Vitas Gerulaitis 6–4, 6–1, 6–2
1981  SWE Björn Borg  TCH Ivan Lendl 6–1, 4–6, 6–2, 3–6, 6–1
1982  SWE Mats Wilander  ARG Guillermo Vilas 1–6, 7–6(8–6), 6–0, 6–4
1983  FRA Yannick Noah  SWE Mats Wilander 6–2, 7–5, 7–6(7–3)
1984  TCH Ivan Lendl  USA John McEnroe 3–6, 2–6, 6–4, 7–5, 7–5
1985  SWE Mats Wilander  TCH Ivan Lendl 3–6, 6–4, 6–2, 6–2
1986  TCH Ivan Lendl  SWE Mikael Pernfors 6–3, 6–2, 6–4
1987  TCH Ivan Lendl  SWE Mats Wilander 7–5, 6–2, 3–6, 7–6(7–3)
1988  SWE Mats Wilander  FRA Henri Leconte 7–5, 6–2, 6–1
1989  USA Michael Chang  SWE Stefan Edberg 6–1, 3–6, 4–6, 6–4, 6–2
1990  ECU Andrés Gómez  USA Andre Agassi 6–3, 2–6, 6–4, 6–4
1991  USA Jim Courier  USA Andre Agassi 3–6, 6–4, 2–6, 6–1, 6–4
1992  USA Jim Courier  TCH Petr Korda 7–5, 6–2, 6–1
1993  ESP Sergi Bruguera  USA Jim Courier 6–4, 2–6, 6–2, 3–6, 6–3
1994  ESP Sergi Bruguera  ESP Alberto Berasategui 6–3, 7–5, 2–6, 6–1
1995  AUT Thomas Muster  USA Michael Chang 7–5, 6–2, 6–4
1996  RUS Yevgeny Kafelnikov  GER Michael Stich 7–6(7–4), 7–5, 7–6(7–4)
1997  BRA Gustavo Kuerten  ESP Sergi Bruguera 6–3, 6–4, 6–2
1998  ESP Carlos Moyà  ESP Àlex Corretja 6–3, 7–5, 6–3
1999  USA Andre Agassi  UKR Andrei Medvedev 1–6, 2–6, 6–4, 6–3, 6–4
2000  BRA Gustavo Kuerten  SWE Magnus Norman 6–2, 6–3, 2–6, 7–6(8–6)
2001  BRA Gustavo Kuerten  ESP Àlex Corretja 6–7(3–7), 7–5, 6–2, 6–0
2002  ESP Albert Costa  ESP Juan Carlos Ferrero 6–1, 6–0, 4–6, 6–3
2003  ESP Juan Carlos Ferrero  NED Martin Verkerk 6–1, 6–3, 6–2
2004  ARG Gastón Gaudio  ARG Guillermo Coria 0–6, 3–6, 6–4, 6–1, 8–6
2005  ESP Rafael Nadal  ARG Mariano Puerta 6–7(6–8), 6–3, 6–1, 7–5
2006  ESP Rafael Nadal   SUI Roger Federer 1–6, 6–1, 6–4, 7–6(7–4)
2007  ESP Rafael Nadal   SUI Roger Federer 6–3, 4–6, 6–3, 6–4
2008  ESP Rafael Nadal   SUI Roger Federer 6–1, 6–3, 6–0
2009   SUI Roger Federer  SWE Robin Söderling 6–1, 7–6(7–1), 6–4
2010  ESP Rafael Nadal  SWE Robin Söderling 6–4, 6–2, 6–4
2011  ESP Rafael Nadal   SUI Roger Federer 7–5, 7–6(7–3), 5–7, 6–1
2012  ESP Rafael Nadal  SRB Novak Djokovic 6–4, 6–3, 2–6, 7–5
2013  ESP Rafael Nadal  ESP David Ferrer 6–3, 6–2, 6–3
2014  ESP Rafael Nadal  SRB Novak Djokovic 3–6, 7–5, 6–2, 6–4
2015   SUI Stan Wawrinka  SRB Novak Djokovic 4–6, 6–4, 6–3, 6–4
2016  SRB Novak Djokovic  GBR Andy Murray 3–6, 6–1, 6–2, 6–4
2017  ESP Rafael Nadal   SUI Stan Wawrinka 6–2, 6–3, 6–1
2018  ESP Rafael Nadal  AUT Dominic Thiem 6–4, 6–3, 6–2

Statistics[edit]

Multiple champions[edit]

Competitions prior to 1925 opened only to French tennis club members and French nationals
Player Amateur Era Open Era All-time Years
 Rafael Nadal (ESP) 0 11 11 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2017, 2018
 Max Decugis (FRA) 8 0 8 1903, 1904, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1912, 1913, 1914
 Björn Borg (SWE) 0 6 6 1974, 1975, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981
 Henri Cochet (FRA) 5 0 5 1922, 1926, 1928, 1930, 1932
 André Vacherot (FRA) 4 0 4 1894, 1895, 1896, 1901
 Paul Aymé (FRA) 4 0 4 1897, 1898, 1899, 1900
 Maurice Germot (FRA) 3 0 3 1905, 1906, 1910
 René Lacoste (FRA) 3 0 3 1925, 1927, 1929
 Mats Wilander (SWE) 0 3 3 1982, 1985, 1988
 Ivan Lendl (TCH) 0 3 3 1984, 1986, 1987
 Gustavo Kuerten (BRA) 0 3 3 1997, 2000, 2001
 André Gobert (FRA) 2 0 2 1911, 1920
 Jean Borotra (FRA) 2 0 2 1924, 1931
 Gottfried von Cramm (GER) 2 0 2 1934, 1936
 Frank Parker (USA) 2 0 2 1948, 1949
 Jaroslav Drobný (EGY) 2 0 2 1951, 1952
 Ken Rosewall (AUS) 1 1 2 1953, 1968
 Tony Trabert (USA) 2 0 2 1954, 1955
 Nicola Pietrangeli (ITA) 2 0 2 1959, 1960
 Manuel Santana (ESP) 2 0 2 1961, 1964
 Rod Laver (AUS) 1 1 2 1962, 1969
 Roy Emerson (AUS) 2 0 2 1963, 1967
 Jan Kodeš (TCH) 0 2 2 1970, 1971
 Jim Courier (USA) 0 2 2 1991, 1992
 Sergi Bruguera (ESP) 0 2 2 1993, 1994

Champions by country[edit]

Country Amateur Era Open Era All-time First title Last title
 France (FRA) 37 (9)* 1 38 (10)* 1892 1983
 Spain (ESP) 2 17 19 1961 2018
 Australia (AUS) 9 2 11 1933 1969
 United States (USA) 7 4 11 1938 1999
 Sweden (SWE) 1 9 10 1957 1988
 Czechoslovakia (TCH)[h] 0 5 5 1970 1987
 Germany (GER) 3 0 3 1934 1937
 Italy (ITA) 2 1 3 1959 1976
 Brazil (BRA) 0 3 3 1997 2001
 Great Britain (GBR) 2 (1)** 0 2 (1)** 1891 1935
 Egypt (EGY) 2 0 2 1951 1952
 Argentina (ARG) 0 2 2 1977 2004
  Switzerland (SUI) 0 2 2 2009 2015
 Hungary (HUN) 1 0 1 1947 1947
 Romania (ROU) 0 1 1 1973 1973
 Ecuador (ECU) 0 1 1 1990 1990
 Austria (AUT) 0 1 1 1995 1995
 Russia (RUS) 0 1 1 1996 1996
 Serbia (SRB) 0 1 1 2016 2016
* 28 victories came while the tournament was still called the French Championships and was open only to French club members.
** 1 victory came while the tournament was still called the French Championships and was open only to French club members.

See also[edit]

French Open other competitions

Grand Slam men's singles

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ In 1909 the tournament was held at the Société Athlétique de la Villa Primrose in Bordeaux.
  2. ^ The tournament was not held from 1915 to 1919 because of World War I.[26]
  • c Each year is linked to an article about that particular event's draw with the exception of the pre-1925 years and 1951.
  • d The dash means that the result or score is unknown because there are no available sources for this information Pre-1914.[25]
  • f The tournament was not officially held from 1940 to 1945 because of World War II. The champions listed are disputed, but are listed by a few sources, which means they are not included in the statistics charts because the tournament does not consider them champions. They are listed here as a historical note.[28][26][29]
  • g Set score in parentheses indicates a tiebreaker score.
  • h Czechoslovakia (TCH, 1918–1992), does not include the totals of Czech Republic (CZE, 1992–present) and Slovakia (SVK, 1992–present).
  • i One win by a player from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1922), plus one win by a player from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (1922–present).

Footnotes[edit]

General

Specific

  1. ^ "The Origins of the Tournament". Roland Garros. Retrieved 25 July 2015. 
  2. ^ "Grand Slam Overview". International Tennis Federation (ITF). Retrieved 23 July 2015. 
  3. ^ Bowers, Chris (27 February 2009). "The New Musketeers". Davis Cup. Retrieved 16 July 2015. 
  4. ^ a b Fetter, Henry D. (6 June 2011). "The French Open During World War II: A Hidden History". The Atlantic. Retrieved 23 July 2015. 
  5. ^ Newbery, Piers (8 June 2014). "Rafael Nadal beats Novak Djokovic to win ninth French Open title". BBC Sport. Retrieved 15 July 2015. 
  6. ^ Clarey, Christopher (22 May 2014). "A Century Ago, a French Title Collection to Rival Rafael Nadal". The New York Times. Retrieved 15 July 2015. 
  7. ^ Lynch, Steven (29 May 2015). "Rafael Nadal the youngest French Open winner?". ESPN. Retrieved 15 July 2015. 
  8. ^ "French Open History". Tennis. Tennis Media Company. 16 August 2012. Retrieved 18 July 2015. 
  9. ^ Gillmeister 1998, p. 225.
  10. ^ a b c "Roland Garros past single winners". CNN. 23 May 2008. Retrieved 19 July 2015. 
  11. ^ Lewis, Gabrielle (23 May 2002). "French Open History". BBC Sport. Retrieved 21 July 2015. 
  12. ^ "Henri Cochet is dead; French Tennis Leader". The New York Times. 3 April 1987. Retrieved 26 July 2015. 
  13. ^ Gray, Michael (28 January 2000). "Donald Budge". The Guardian. Retrieved 26 July 2015. 
  14. ^ Ford, Bonnie D. (12 October 2008). "Reform to an Open status altered the course of tennis history". ESPN. Retrieved 27 July 2015. 
  15. ^ Henderson, Jon (15 June 2008). "Now I'd choose tennis". The Observer. Retrieved 25 July 2015. 
  16. ^ a b c "Rafael Nadal, Bjorn Borg, Ivan Lendl and the seven kings of clay". Sky Sports. 22 May 2015. Retrieved 25 July 2015. 
  17. ^ Gross, Jane (6 June 1983). "Noah captures French crown". The New York Times. Retrieved 5 August 2015. 
  18. ^ Gittings, Paul (8 June 2012). "Chang's 'underhand' tactics stunned Lendl and made Tennis history". CNN. Retrieved 25 July 2015. 
  19. ^ "Topics of The Times – An American in Paris". The New York Times. 10 June 1992. Retrieved 25 July 2015. 
  20. ^ Roberts, John (6 June 1994). "Bruguera towers above tired Berasategui". The Independent. Retrieved 25 July 2015. 
  21. ^ Newberry, Piers (8 June 2008). "Nadal storms to fourth French win". BBC Sport. Retrieved 25 July 2015. 
  22. ^ Ornstein, David (7 June 2009). "Federer claims historic Paris win". BBC Sport. Retrieved 25 July 2015. 
  23. ^ "Novak Djokovic beats Andy Murray to win first French Open title". BBC Sport. 5 June 2016. Retrieved 5 June 2016. 
  24. ^ The Encyclopedia Of Tennis: 100 Years Of Great Players And Events; by Max Robertson and Jack Kramer. 1974 edition, page 375. Source for finalists and scores
  25. ^ a b c "French Open Men's Singles". Grand Slam History. Retrieved 2009-11-04. 
  26. ^ a b "Past Winners and Draws". fft.fr. Fédération Française de Tennis. Archived from the original on 2007-08-08. Retrieved 2009-07-02. 
  27. ^ "Superb Soderling Sends Nadal Crashing Out". atpworldtour.com. ATP Tour. 2009-05-31. Retrieved 2009-08-04. 
  28. ^ "French Open Singles Champions". USA Today. 10-06-2001. Retrieved 10-07-2012.  Check date values in: |accessdate=, |date= (help)
  29. ^ "Event Guide / History / Past Winners 1891 – 2011". rolandgarros.com. IBM, Fédération Française de Tennis. Retrieved 2016-03-05. 

References[edit]

  • Gillmeister, Heiner (1998). Tennis: A Cultural History (Repr. ed.). London: Leicester University Press. ISBN 978-0718501952. 
  • Robertson, Max; Kramer, Jack (1974). The Encyclopedia Of Tennis: 100 Years Of Great Players And Events. Studio. ISBN 978-0670294084.