2020 French Open

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2020 French Open
Date27 September – 11 October
Edition124th
90th Grand Slam
CategoryGrand Slam tournament
Draw128S / 64D / 32X
Prize money
SurfaceClay
LocationParis (XVIe), France
VenueRoland Garros Stadium
2019 Champions
Men's Singles
Spain Rafael Nadal
Women's Singles
Australia Ashleigh Barty
Men's Doubles
Germany Kevin Krawietz / Germany Andreas Mies
Women's Doubles
Hungary Tímea Babos / France Kristina Mladenovic
Mixed Doubles
Chinese Taipei Latisha Chan / Croatia Ivan Dodig
Boys' Singles
Denmark Holger Vitus Nødskov Rune
Girls' Singles
Canada Leylah Annie Fernandez
Boys' Doubles
Brazil Matheus Pucinelli de Almeida /
Argentina Thiago Agustín Tirante
Girls' Doubles
United States Chloe Beck / United States Emma Navarro
Legends Under 45 Doubles
France Sébastien Grosjean / France Michaël Llodra
Women's Legends Doubles
France Nathalie Dechy / France Amélie Mauresmo
Legends Over 45 Doubles
Spain Sergi Bruguera / Croatia Goran Ivanišević
Wheelchair Men's Singles
Argentina Gustavo Fernández
Wheelchair Women's Singles
Netherlands Diede de Groot
Wheelchair Quad Singles
Australia Dylan Alcott
Wheelchair Men's Doubles
Argentina Gustavo Fernández / Japan Shingo Kunieda
Wheelchair Women's Doubles
Netherlands Diede de Groot / Netherlands Aniek van Koot
Wheelchair Quad Doubles
Australia Dylan Alcott / United States David Wagner
← 2019 · French Open · 2021 →

The 2020 French Open is a Grand Slam tennis tournament played on outdoor clay courts. It will be held at the Stade Roland Garros in Paris, France. Originally to be scheduled from 24 May to 7 June, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it was then first moved to 20 September to 4 October, was later moved back a week further to 27 September to 11 October and then finally expanded by six additional days to 21 September to start the qualifying matches, comprising singles, doubles and mixed doubles play. Junior and wheelchair tournaments are also scheduled. Rafael Nadal is the twelve-time champion in men's singles; Ashleigh Barty was the defending champion in women's singles, but chose not to defend her title following concerns over the ongoing pandemic.[1]

It will be the 124th edition of the French Open and the last Grand Slam event of 2020. The main singles draws will include 16 qualifiers for men and 12 for women out of 128 players in each draw.

It is also the only Grand Slam to retain the advantage set in the final sets, as the Australian Open and Wimbledon have switched to tiebreaks.[2][3]

Tournament[edit]

Court Philippe Chatrier, where the finals of the French Open will take place before the 2019 renovation.

The 2020 French Open will be the 124th edition of the French Open and will be held at Stade Roland Garros in Paris. It will also be the first year in which there is a retractable roof on the French tennis courts, after construction was completed on Court Phillipe Chatrier in late 2019, with plans in place to also have a roof on Court Suzanne Lenglen by 2023.[4] Additionally, it will be the first year in which night tennis will be possible, as floodlights will be in operation on the four main stadium courts.

The tournament is run by the International Tennis Federation (ITF) and is part of the 2020 ATP Tour and the 2020 WTA Tour calendars under the Grand Slam category. The tournament will consist of both men's and women's singles and doubles draws as well as a mixed doubles event.[5]

There is a singles and doubles events for both boys and girls (players under 18), which is part of the Grade A category of tournaments,[6] and singles and doubles events for men's and women's wheelchair tennis players under the Grand Slam category.[7] The tournament will be played on clay courts and took place over a series of 23 courts, including the three main showcourts, Court Philippe Chatrier, Court Suzanne Lenglen and Court Simonne Mathieu.[5][8]

Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic[edit]

This event is normally held on the fourth Sunday of May and ending in early June and it is the second Grand Slam of the year on the peak of the spring clay court season. Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, on 17 March, French Tennis Federation announced the tournament had been postponed and dates were moved first to 20 September to 4 October 2020 (the dates were initially scheduled for the annual Asian Hard Court swing which would be eventually cancelled on 24 July), and then moved a week further to 27 September to 11 October 2020, just two weeks after the 2020 US Open. For the first time since the 1947 French Championships, this event will not be held on the traditional May-June schedule and the first time since the introduction of the Open Era that a major tournament has been postponed rather than cancelled. On 13 April 2020, the French Government extended a ban on mass gatherings until July 2020 in a bid to control the spread of the virus.[9]

The Laver Cup was scheduled from 24–27 September, conflicting with the initial new date for the French Open (20 September to 4 October), before being postponed to 2021.[10]

On 7 September, it was announced the three main courts would have a maximum capacity of 11,500 spectators during the 15-day tournament, with 5,000 each in Court Philippe Chatrier and Court Suzanne Lenglen, and 1,500 in Court Simmone Mathieu. The rest of the courts would take place without spectators including the qualifying events. Those guidelines will follow on the health and safety protocols including social distancing regulations in order with the regional government officials. According to the tournament director Guy Forget, players and personnel would have to be tested for the virus upon arrival in Paris as if they would have a negative test and a second test 72 hours later. Players would then have to stay at two hotels from organizers once they get tested. On 17 September, the number of spectators later revised to reduce to 5,000 in all of the three main courts as the number of coronavirus cases have rising in France.[11][12]

Points and prize money[edit]

Points distribution[edit]

Below is a series of tables for each of the competitions showing the ranking points on offer for each event.

Senior points[edit]

Event W F SF QF Round of 16 Round of 32 Round of 64 Round of 128 Q Q3 Q2 Q1
Men's Singles 2000 1200 720 360 180 90 45 10 25 16 8 0
Men's Doubles 0 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Women's Singles 1300 780 430 240 130 70 10 40 30 20 2
Women's Doubles 10 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

Wheelchair points[edit]

Event W F SF/3rd QF/4th
Singles 800 500 375 100
Doubles 800 500 100 N/A
Quad Singles 800 500 100 N/A
Quad Doubles 800 100 N/A N/A

Junior points[edit]

Event W F SF QF Round of 16 Round of 32 Q Q3
Boys' Singles 1000 600 370 200 100 45 30 20
Girls' Singles
Boys' Doubles 750 450 275 150 75 N/A N/A N/A
Girls' Doubles N/A N/A N/A

Prize money[edit]

Event W F SF QF Round of 16 Round of 32 Round of 64 Round of 128 Q3 Q2 Q1
Singles €1,600,000 €800,000 €425,250 €283,500 €189,000 €126,000 €84,000 €60,000 €25,600 €16,000 €10,000
Doubles * €319,652 €188,030 €110,606 €65,062 €38,272 €23,920 €14,950 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Mixed Doubles * N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Wheelchair Singles N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Wheelchair Doubles * N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

* per team

Singles seeds[edit]

The following are the projected seeded players. Seedings are based on the ATP and WTA rankings on 21 September 2020. Seeds are planned to be announced on 25 September 2020. Rank and points before are as of 28 September 2020.[13][14]

Men's Singles[edit]

Seed Rank Player Points
before
Points defending Points won Points
after
Status
1 1 Serbia Novak Djokovic 720 First round vs. TBD
2 2 Spain Rafael Nadal 9,850 2,000 10 9,850 First round vs. TBD
3 3 Austria Dominic Thiem 9,125 1,200 10 9,125 First round vs. TBD
4 5 Russia Daniil Medvedev 10 First round vs. TBD
5 6 Greece Stefanos Tsitsipas 180 First round vs. TBD
6 7 Germany Alexander Zverev 4,650 360 10 4,650 First round vs. TBD
7 8 Italy Matteo Berrettini 3,030 45 10 3,030 First round vs. TBD
8 9 France Gaël Monfils 45 First round vs. TBD
9 10 Canada Denis Shapovalov 10 First round vs. TBD
10 11 Spain Roberto Bautista Agut 90 First round vs. TBD
11 12 Belgium David Goffin 2,555 90 10 2,555 First round vs. TBD
12 13 Russia Andrey Rublev 0 First round vs. TBD
13 14 Italy Fabio Fognini 180 First round vs. TBD
14 15 Argentina Diego Schwartzman 45 First round vs. TBD
15 16 Russia Karen Khachanov 360 First round vs. TBD
16 17 Switzerland Stan Wawrinka 2,185 360 10 2,185 First round vs. TBD
17 18 Spain Pablo Carreño Busta 2,130 90 10 2,130 First round vs. TBD
18 19 Bulgaria Grigor Dimitrov 2,055 90 10 2,055 First round vs. TBD
19 20 Canada Milos Raonic 2,040 0 10 2,050 First round vs. TBD
20 21 Canada Félix Auger-Aliassime 0 First round vs. TBD
21 22 Chile Cristian Garín 45 First round vs. TBD
22 23 United States John Isner 1,805 0 10 1,815 First round vs. TBD
23 24 Serbia Dušan Lajović 90 First round vs. TBD
24 25 France Benoît Paire 180 First round vs. TBD
25 26 Croatia Borna Ćorić 1,670 180 10 1,670 First round vs. TBD
26 27 Australia Alex de Minaur 1,665 45 10 1,665 First round vs. TBD
27 28 Serbia Filip Krajinović 1,628 90 10 1,628 First round vs. TBD
28 29 United States Taylor Fritz 45 First round vs. TBD
29 30 Norway Casper Ruud 1,604 90 10 1,604 First round vs. TBD
30 31 Poland Hubert Hurkacz 1,468 10 10 1,468 First round vs. TBD
31 32 Germany Jan-Lennard Struff 180 First round vs. TBD
32 33 Georgia (country) Nikoloz Basilashvili 1,395 10 10 1,395 First round vs. TBD

The following player would have been seeded, but withdrew before the event.

Rank Player Points before Points defending Points after Withdrawal reason
4 Switzerland Roger Federer 6,630 720 6,630 Right knee surgery

Women's Singles[edit]

Seed Rank Player Points
before
Points defending Points won Points
after
Status
1 2 Romania Simona Halep 430 First round vs. TBD
2 4 Czech Republic Karolína Plíšková 5,205 130 10 5,205 First round vs. TBD
3 5 Ukraine Elina Svitolina 130 First round vs. TBD
4 6 United States Sofia Kenin 4,700 240 10 4,700 First round vs. TBD
5 8 Netherlands Kiki Bertens 4,335 70 10 4,335 First round vs. TBD
6 9 United States Serena Williams 4,080 130 10 4,080 First round vs. TBD
7 10 Switzerland Belinda Bencic 4,010 130 10 4,010 First round vs. TBD
8 11 Czech Republic Petra Kvitová 3,736 0 10 3,746 First round vs. TBD
9 12 Belarus Aryna Sabalenka 70 First round vs. TBD
10 13 United Kingdom Johanna Konta 3,152 780 10 3,152 First round vs. TBD
11 14 Belarus Victoria Azarenka 3,122 70 10 3,122 First round vs. TBD
12 15 Spain Garbiñe Muguruza 240 First round vs. TBD
13 16 United States Madison Keys 2,962 430 10 2,962 First round vs. TBD
14 17 Croatia Petra Martić 2,850 430 10 2,850 First round vs. TBD
15 18 Belgium Elise Mertens 130 First round vs. TBD
16 19 Kazakhstan Elena Rybakina 40 First round vs. TBD
17 20 Czech Republic Markéta Vondroušová 1,300 First round vs. TBD
18 21 Estonia Anett Kontaveit 2,330 10 10 2,330 First round vs. TBD
19 22 Germany Angelique Kerber 2,270 10 10 2,270 First round vs. TBD
20 23 United States Alison Riske 2,256 10 10 2,256 First round vs. TBD
21 24 Greece Maria Sakkari 2,240 70 10 2,240 First round vs. TBD
22 25 United States Jennifer Brady 2,165 70 10 2,165 First round vs. TBD
23 26 Ukraine Dayana Yastremska 1,984 10 10 1,984 First round vs. TBD
24 27 Czech Republic Karolína Muchová 1,982 70 10 1,982 First round vs. TBD
25 28 Kazakhstan Yulia Putintseva 1,955 10 10 1,955 First round vs. TBD
26 29 United States Amanda Anisimova 780 First round vs. TBD
27 30 Croatia Donna Vekić 1,880 240 10 1,880 First round vs. TBD
28 31 Russia Ekaterina Alexandrova 130 First round vs. TBD
29 33 Russia Svetlana Kuznetsova 1,631 10 10 1,631 First round vs. TBD
30 34 Poland Magda Linette 1,601 70 10 1,601 First round vs. TBD
31 35 Russia Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova 10 First round vs. TBD
32 36 Czech Republic Barbora Strýcová 1,589 10 10 1,589 First round vs. TBD

The following players would have been seeded, but withdrew before the event.

Rank Player Points before Points defending Points after Withdrawal reason
1 Australia Ashleigh Barty 8,717 2,000 8,717 Safety concerns
3 Japan Naomi Osaka 5,780 130 5,780 Hamstring injury
7 Canada Bianca Andreescu 4,555 70 4,555
China Wang Qiang 1,706 70 1,706 Safety concerns

Doubles seeds[edit]

Mixed doubles[edit]

Team Rank1 Seed
[[]] [[]] 1
[[]] [[]] 2
[[]] [[]] 3
[[]] [[]] 4
[[]] [[]] 5
[[]] [[]] 6
[[]] [[]] 7
[[]] [[]] 8

1Rankings as of 21 September 2020.

Main draw wildcard entries[edit]

The following players will be given wildcards (WC) to the main draw based on internal selection and recent performances.

Mixed Doubles[edit]

  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /

Main draw qualifiers[edit]

Protected/Special ranking[edit]

The following players were accepted directly into the main draw using a protected/special ranking:[13][14]

Withdrawals[edit]

The following players were accepted directly into the main tournament, but withdrew due to injury, suspension, or personal reasons:

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Wang Xiyu would've been the next player entered into the draw, but she also withdrew.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "World No 1 Ash Barty to skip French Open title defence due to Covid concerns". The Guardian. Retrieved 2020-09-09.
  2. ^ "Wimbledon: Final set tie-breaks to be introduced in 2019". Retrieved 17 May 2019.
  3. ^ "Australian Open announces introduction of final set tie-breaks". Retrieved 17 May 2019.
  4. ^ "French Open welcomes new retractable roof on Philippe-Chatrier court". CNN. 5 February 2020. Retrieved 16 February 2020.
  5. ^ a b "Roland Garros". International Tennis Federation. Retrieved 12 April 2018.
  6. ^ "Roland Garros Junior French Defchampionships". International Tennis Federation. Retrieved 12 April 2018.
  7. ^ "Circuit Info". International Tennis Federation. Retrieved 7 June 2015.
  8. ^ "The Courts". Roland Garros. Retrieved 12 April 2018.
  9. ^ Nussbaum, Ania; Amiel, Geraldine (14 April 2020). "Macron Extends Virus Lockdown, Says France Was Underprepared". Bloomberg. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  10. ^ "Coronavirus: French Open tennis moved to September". BBC Sport. 17 March 2020. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  11. ^ "French Open Allowing Spectators Amid Coronavirus Resurgence". Sports Illustrated. Associated Press. 7 September 2020. Retrieved 8 September 2020.
  12. ^ "Coronavirus forces further restrictions on French Open spectator numbers". PA Media. BT Sport. 17 September 2020. Retrieved 18 September 2020.
  13. ^ a b "RG20 Simple Hommes" [RG20 Men's Singles] (PDF) (in French). French Tennis Federation. Retrieved 3 September 2020.
  14. ^ a b "RG20 Simple Femmes" [RG20 Women's Singles] (PDF) (in French). French Tennis Federation. Retrieved 3 September 2020.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i "FEDERER AND KYRGIOS BIG NAME ABSENTEES FROM FRENCH OPEN AS NADAL EYES 13TH TITLE". Eurosport. Retrieved 5 September 2020.
  16. ^ "Lucas Pouille forfait pour Roland-Garros" [Lucas Pouille withdrew from Roland-Garros]. L'Équipe. 17 September 2020. Retrieved 17 September 2020.
  17. ^ "ROLAND-GARROS - BLESSÉ, JO-WILFRIED TSONGA ANNONCE SON FORFAIT ET UNE ABSENCE JUSQU'EN 2021" [ROLAND-GARROS - INJURED, JO-WILFRIED TSONGA ANNOUNCES HIS WITHDRAWAL AND ABSENCE UNTIL 2021] (in French). Eurosport. Retrieved 17 September 2020.
  18. ^ "Bianca Andreescu will not play in French Open tournament". CBC. 19 September 2020.
  19. ^ "Maria announces second pregnancy, break from tennis". WTA. 3 April 2020.
  20. ^ "Tennis: Naomi Osaka withdraws from French Open with hamstring injury". The Straits Times. 18 September 2020. Retrieved 18 September 2020.

External links[edit]

Preceded by
2019 French Open
French Open Succeeded by
2021 French Open
Preceded by
2020 US Open
Grand Slam events Succeeded by
2021 Australian Open