Preston School of Industry

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Preston Castle
Preston Castle 1.jpg
Preston School of Industry is located in California
Preston School of Industry
Preston School of Industry is located in the US
Preston School of Industry
Nearest city Ione, California
Coordinates 38°21′40″N 120°56′13″W / 38.36111°N 120.93694°W / 38.36111; -120.93694Coordinates: 38°21′40″N 120°56′13″W / 38.36111°N 120.93694°W / 38.36111; -120.93694
Built 1890
Architect Schulze, Henry A.
Architectural style Romanesque
NRHP reference # 75000422
CHISL # 867[1]
Added to NRHP July 30, 1975[2]

The Preston School of Industry, also known as Preston Castle, was one of the oldest and best-known reform schools in the United States. It is located in Ione, California, in Amador County.[3]

After construction was finished in 1890, the institution was opened in June 1894 when seven wards (minors under the guardianship of the state, but not necessarily juvenile offenders), were transferred there from San Quentin State Prison. The original building, known colloquially as "Preston Castle" (or simply "The Castle"), is the most significant example of Romanesque Revival architecture in the Mother Lode.[citation needed] It was vacated in 1960, shortly after new buildings had been constructed to replace it. The abandoned building has since been named a California Historical Landmark (#867)[1] and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NPS-75000422).[3]

In 1999, the institution's official name was changed to the "Preston Youth Correctional Facility".

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation announced on October 21, 2010, that the facility was to close,[4] and a closing ceremony was held on June 2, 2011.

Former wards[edit]

Preston Castle in Ione, California, built in the latter half of the 19th century.

Former Preston wards include:[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Preston Castle". Office of Historic Preservation, California State Parks. Retrieved 2012-10-06. 
  2. ^ National Park Service (2008-04-15). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  3. ^ a b "Preston Castle Foundation". www.prestoncastle.com. Retrieved 29 March 2018. 
  4. ^ Hedger, Matthew (October 21, 2010). "Preston Youth Correctional Facility to close". Ledger Dispatch. Amador: Ledger-Dispatch.com. Retrieved 2011-01-30. 
  5. ^ McManis, Sam (27 June 2015). "Discoveries: Ione's Preston Castle opens up about its harsh, haunting past". Retrieved 29 March 2018 – via Sacramento Bee. 

External links[edit]