Roman Catholic Diocese of Springfield in Illinois

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Diocese of Springfield in Illinois

Diœcesis Campifontis in Illinois
Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception - Springfield, Illinois 02.jpg
Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception
Roman Catholic Diocese of Springfield in Illinois.svg
Coat of arms
Location
Country United States
Territory28 counties across south central Illinois
Ecclesiastical provinceChicago
Deaneries5 Deaneries - Alton, Jerseyville, Mattoon, Quincy, Springfield
Statistics
Area39,195 km2 (15,133 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics (including non-members)
(as of 2010)
1,187,100
145,189[1] (13%)
Parishes129
Schools36 elementary, 7 secondary [1]
Information
DenominationCatholic
Sui iuris churchLatin Church
RiteRoman Rite
EstablishedJuly 29, 1853 as the Diocese of Quincy;
January 9, 1857 as the Diocese of Alton;
October 26, 1923 as the Diocese of Springfield in Illinois
CathedralCathedral of the Immaculate Conception
Patron saintMary, the Immaculate Conception
Current leadership
PopeFrancis
BishopMost Reverend Thomas J. Paprocki
Vicar GeneralVery Reverend David J. Hoefler
Map
Diocese of Springfield (Illinois - USA).jpg
Website
dio.org

The Diocese of Springfield in Illinois (Latin: Diœcesis Campifontis in Illinois) is a Latin Church ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Catholic Church in the south central Illinois region of the United States. The prelate is a bishop serving as pastor of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception.

The Diocese of Springfield in Illinois is a suffragan diocese in the ecclesiastical province of the metropolitan Archdiocese of Chicago. The metropolitan bishop of Springfield in Illinois is the Archbishop of Chicago. On 20 April 2010, Pope Benedict named Thomas J. Paprocki as the ninth Bishop of the Diocese of Springfield in Illinois, replacing Archbishop Lucas. Bishop Paprocki had previously been an Auxiliary Bishop of the Archdiocese of Chicago under Cardinal George since 2003.[2]

The Diocese of Springfield in Illinois comprises the Counties of Adams, Bond, Brown, Calhoun, Cass, Christian, Clark, Coles, Crawford, Cumberland, Douglas, Edgar, Effingham, Fayette, Greene, Jasper, Jersey, Macon, Macoupin, Madison, Menard, Moultrie, Montgomery, Morgan, Pike, Sangamon, Scott, and Shelby. The counties are organized into five deaneries: Alton, Jerseyville, Mattoon, Quincy and Springfield.[3]

History[edit]

The Diocese of Springfield in Illinois was established on July 29, 1853 as the Diocese of Quincy. Its name was changed to the Diocese of Alton on January 9, 1857, and its current name came into being on October 26, 1923.[4]

Statistics[edit]

As of 2012:[5]

  • 142,847 Catholics
  • 130 parishes
  • 106 Diocesan Priests (active and retired)
  • 49 Religious Priests
  • 27 Religious Brothers
  • 667 Women Religious
  • 37 Permanent Deacons
  • 2,344 Baptisms
  • 1,980 First Communions
  • 2,041 Confirmations
  • 667 Weddings
  • 1,610 Funerals
  • 294 Scheduled Weekend Masses

As of 2007:[6]

  • 151,601 Catholics
  • 132 parishes
  • 87 active priests; 62 religious institute priests
  • 122 diocesan priests (including retired and serving outside the diocese)
  • 6 Catholic hospitals

Bishops[edit]

Bishop Elect of Quincy[edit]

Bishops of Alton[edit]

  1. Henry Damian Juncker (1857-1868)
  2. Peter Joseph Baltes (1870-1886)
  3. James Ryan (1888-1923)

Bishops of Springfield in Illinois[edit]

  1. James Aloysius Griffin (1924-1948)
  2. William Aloysius O'Connor (1949-1975)
  3. Joseph Alphonse McNicholas (1975-1983)
  4. Daniel L. Ryan (1984-1999)
  5. George J. Lucas (1999-2009), appointed Archbishop of Omaha
  6. Thomas J. Paprocki (2010–present)

Other priests of the diocese who became bishops[edit]

Parishes[edit]

There are currently 128 parishes in the Diocese of Springfield in Illinois.[5] The Diocese also operates campus ministry centers at 6 colleges and universities within its boundaries.

Notable parishes:

Campus ministry[edit]

In addition to these parishes, the Diocese operates campus ministry centers at the following institutions:[7]

Catholic schools[edit]

High schools[edit]

There are seven high schools in the Diocese of Springfield in Illinois.[8]

This does not count Ursuline Academy, closed in 2007.

Universities[edit]

There is one Catholic university in the Diocese of Springfield in Illinois.[9]

Religious houses[edit]

The Diocese is home to 14 religious houses.[10]

Arms[edit]

Coat of arms of Roman Catholic Diocese of Springfield in Illinois
Roman Catholic Diocese of Springfield in Illinois.svg
Notes
Arms was designed and adopted when the diocese was erected
Adopted
1923
Escutcheon
These arms are composed of a gold (yellow) field on which is displayed a blue cross. Within each quarter that is formed by the cross is a roundel of alternating blue and silver (white) wavy bars. Each of these roundels is known heraldically as a "fountain." At the center of the cross is a silver (white) crescent.
Symbolism
A gold (yellow) field on which is displayed a blue cross denotes Faith. The fountain is used to represent a small body of water, such as a pond or a spring. So, canting the name of the See City, the background of the diocesan arms is a "field of springs," thus, Springfield. At the center crescent is to represent the moon, a classic symbolism for our Blessed Mother, in her title of the Immaculate Conception, titular of the Cathedral-church in Springfield.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Demographic Profile of the Diocese". www.dio.org. Retrieved Apr 21, 2021.
  2. ^ Press Office of the Holy See
  3. ^ "Deaneries of the Diocese". Diocese of Springfield in Illinois Website. Diocese of Springfield in Illinois. Retrieved 5 July 2013.
  4. ^ "History of the Diocese of Springfield". Diocese of Springfield in Illinois Website. Diocese of Springfield in Illinois. Retrieved 5 July 2013.
  5. ^ a b "Demographic Profile of the Diocese". Diocese of Springfield in Illinois Website. Diocese of Springfield in Illinois. Retrieved 5 July 2013.
  6. ^ The Official Catholic Directory 2007 (published in New Providence, New Jersey: P. J. Kennedy and Sons, 2007)
  7. ^ "Campus Ministries Centers". Diocese of Springfield in Illinois Website. Diocese of Springfield in Illinois. Retrieved 5 July 2013.
  8. ^ "High School Directory". Diocese of Springfield in Illinois Website. Diocese of Springfield in Illinois. Retrieved 5 July 2013.
  9. ^ "University Directory". Diocese of Springfield in Illinois Website. Diocese of Springfield in Illinois. Retrieved 5 July 2013.
  10. ^ "Councils, Institutes & Ministries". Diocese of Springfield in Illinois Website. Diocese of Springfield in Illinois. Retrieved 5 July 2013.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 39°46′59″N 89°39′34″W / 39.78306°N 89.65944°W / 39.78306; -89.65944