Salcete

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Salcete
Saxtti/Xaxtti
Salcette
Taluka (sub-district)
Idyllic scenery
Salcete countryside
Location of Salcete in South Goa, Goa
Location of Salcete in South Goa, Goa
Coordinates: 15°12′45″N 74°04′24″E / 15.212450°N 74.07323°E / 15.212450; 74.07323Coordinates: 15°12′45″N 74°04′24″E / 15.212450°N 74.07323°E / 15.212450; 74.07323
Country India
StateGoa
DistrictSouth Goa
HeadquartersMargao
Settlements (as of 2011)2 cities
11 towns
35 villages
Government
 • Deputy CollectorJyoti Kumari, IAS[1]
 • Talukadar[1]Prataprao Gaunkar
Population
 (2011)[2]
 • Total294,504
DemonymSaxtticar/Xaxtticar
PIN
4036XX, 4037XX
Vehicle registrationGA-08

Salcete (KonkaniSaxtti/Xaxtti; Portuguese: Salcette) is a sub-division of the district of South Goa, in the state of Goa, situated by the west coast of India.[3] The Sal river and its backwaters dominate the landscape of Salcete.[4] Historically, the sixty-six settlements south of the Zuari river formed the original Salcette territory.[5] Salcete forms a part of the bigger Konkan coastal plain that stretches along much of the western shoreline of peninsular India.[6]

In erstwhile Portuguese Goa, the Salcette concelho (county) located in the Velhas Conquistas (Old Conquests) was conterminous with the undivided Salcette territory (Salcete and Mormugaõ talukas).[7] In 1917, the territory was bifurcated into the present-day talukas.[8] The contemporary Salcete taluka of the civil district of South Goa is a rurban area.[9] Margao serves as the administrative headquarters of both Salcete taluka and the South Goa district.[10]

Etymology[edit]

"Salcete" is the modern anglicised spelling of the historical lusitanised version Salcette. This word "Salcette" has been derived from the Konkani word Saxtti; साष्टी; Sāṣṭī (IPA: [/'saːʂʈiː/])—a corruption of the Sanskrit word "षट-षष्टि"; ṣaṭa-ṣaṣṭi (IPA: [/'ʂaʈa-ʂaʂʈi/])[a]—meaning "sixty-six".[11] According to the Hindu mythology of the Konkan, the original sixty-six settlements of the Salcette territory were established by sixty-six Saraswat Brahmin clans who had emigrated here from northern India.[12] In Goan Konkani, the natives are referred to as Saxtticar or Xaxtticar; साष्टीकार/षाष्टीकार; Sāṣṭīkār/Ṣāṣṭīkār (IPA: [/'saːʂʈiːkaːɾ/] or [/'ʂaːʂʈiːkaːɾ/]).[3] The Salcete Konkani dialect of southern Goa known as "Saxtti" is notably different from the "Antruzi" (Ponda) and "Bardescari" (Bardez) dialects of northern Goa.[13]

History[edit]

King Viramarmadeva of the Kadamba dynasty issued a copper-plate inscription in 1049 CE concerning a grant of a piece of land called Tudukapura in Kudtarika agrahara of Chhat sathi desha. This inscription suggests that Chhat sathi refers to modern Salcete, known as "Sāṣṭī" in the local language.[14]

Salcette territory[edit]

Historical Salcette[edit]

The original sixty-six settlements of Salcette are as follows:[15]

  1. Sernabatim
  2. Vanelim
  3. Colva
  4. Seraulim
  5. Gandaulim
  6. Duncolim
  7. Betalbatim
  8. Nuvem
  9. Calata
  10. Gonsua
  11. Majorda
  12. Utorda
  13. Nagoa
  14. Verna
  15. Loutulim
  16. Camurlim
  17. Ambora
  18. Raia
  19. Rachol
  20. Curtorim
  21. Nesai
  22. Macasana
  23. Guirdolim
  24. Chandor
  25. Cavorim
  26. Paroda
  27. Mulem
  28. Sarzora
  29. Talvorda
  30. Veroda
  31. Cuncolim
  32. Betul
  33. Velim
  34. Ambelim
  35. Assolna
  36. Cavelossim
  37. Chinchinim
  38. Deussua
  39. Carmona
  40. Orlim
  41. Varca
  42. Sirlim
  43. Dramapur
  44. Dicarpale
  45. Davorlim
  46. Aquem
  47. Telaulim
  48. Navelim
  49. Margao
  50. Benaulim
  51. Adsuli
  52. Cana
  53. Mormugao
  54. Vadem
  55. Chicalim
  56. Dabolim
  57. Sancoale
  58. Cortalim
  59. Quelossim
  60. Cuelim
  61. Arossim
  62. Cansaulim
  63. Velsao
  64. Pale
  65. Issorcim
  66. Chilcona

Contemporary Salcete[edit]

Environs typical of houses in rural Salcete

Salcete taluka comprises nine comunidades: Benaulim, Betalbatim, Colva, Curtorim, Loutolim, Margao, Nuvem, Raia, and Verna.

The sub-district consists of two cities, eleven towns, and thirty-five villages as per the 2011 Census of India.

Salcete Taluka (Census 2011)[2]
# Settlements Population
Municipal Councils
1. Margao 87,650
2. Cuncolim 16,623
Census Towns
1. Davorlim 15,350
2. Curtorim 12,886
3. Navelim 12,323
4. Benaulim 11,919
5. Raia 10,706
6. São José de Areal 10,229
7. Nuvem 9,288
8. Chinchinim 6,908
9. Verna 6,632
10. Aquem 6,511
11. Varca 5,439
Villages
1. Adsulim 214
2. Ambelim 2,853
3. Assolna 3,410
4. Betalbatim 3,551
5. Calata 1,739
6. Camurlim 2,247
7. Cana 494
8. Carmona 3,864
9. Cavelossim 1,955
10. Cavorim 2,228
11 Chandor 707
12. Colva 3,141
13. Deussua 1,479
14. Dicarpale 3,057
15. Dramapur 3,441
16. Duncolim 748
17. Gandaulim 438
18. Gonsua 222
19. Guirdolim 3,622
20. Loutolim 6,121
21. Macasana 1,972
22. Majorda 2,813
23. Mulem 2,799
24. Nagoa 3,873
25. Orlim 2,049
26. Paroda 620
27. Rachol 1,686
28. Sarzora 2,270
29. Seraulim 3,250
30. Sernabatim 1,548
31. Sirlim 845
32. Talaulim 2,911
33. Utorda 2,018
34. Vanelim 1,860
35. Velim 5,955
Total 2,94,504

Notes[edit]

  1. ^

    Founded as they seem to be by immigrant Brahmins somewhere between the 4th and the 12th centuries of the present era ... Salcete is the Portuguese corruption of Sāsaṣṭi, the sixty-six settlements which can also be traced in modern times.

    — Kosambi 1962, p. 169

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Who's Who | South Goa District | India". southgoa.nic.in. Archived from the original on 25 March 2021. Retrieved 15 January 2022.
  2. ^ a b Chandramouli, C. (2015) [2010–11]. "Salcete Taluka — South Goa". Office of the Registrar General and Census Commissioner, India. Government of India. Census Organization of India. Retrieved 12 December 2019.
  3. ^ a b Sequeira, Newton (21 December 2014). "The true soul of Goa's South". The Times of India. Retrieved 16 April 2020.
  4. ^ Nambirajan, M. (2007). Coastal Archaeology of Western India: With Special Reference to Goa. Kaveri Books. p. 134. ISBN 9788174790798.
  5. ^ Rodrigues 1990, p. 231
  6. ^ Halarnakar, Tanaji D. (1990). Gram Panchayats in Goa: A Critical Study. Rajhauns Vitaran. p. 48.
  7. ^ Pandit, Heta; Mascarenhas, Annabel; Koshy, Ashok; Dalvi, Sunita (1999). Houses of Goa (2, illustrated ed.). Architecture Autonomous. p. 15.
  8. ^ Pinho, Vasco (2007). "Snapshots" of Indo-Portuguese history, Volume 1. p. 122.
  9. ^ Deshpande, Abhijeet. "Exploring Salcete, places near Margao". Indiatimes.com. The Times Group. Retrieved 30 November 2019.
  10. ^ Deshpande, Abhijeet. "Margao, the cultural capital of Goa". Indiatimes.com. The Times Group. Retrieved 30 November 2019.
  11. ^ Macdonell, Arthur Anthony (1929). A practical Sanskrit dictionary with transliteration, accentuation, and etymological analysis throughout. London: Oxford University Press. p. 168.
  12. ^ De Souza, Teotonio R. (1990). De Souza, Teotonio R. (ed.). Goa Through The Ages: An Economic History, Volume II, Issue VI. Goa University Publication. Concept Publishing Company. p. 6. ISBN 9788170222590.
  13. ^ Fernandes, Joaquim (15 February 2010). "Saxtti dialect draws the laughs on Konkani stage". The Times of India. The Times Group. Retrieved 30 November 2019.
  14. ^ Kadamb 2013, pp. 1–14
  15. ^ Rodrigues 1990, p. 245

References[edit]

  • Kadamb, S. G. (2013). Sources of History of the Kadambas of Goa: Inscriptions (First ed.). Broadway Publishing House. pp. 1–14. ISBN 9789380837314.
  • Kosambi, Damodar Dharmanand (1962). Myth and Reality: Studies in the Formation of Indian Culture (reprint ed.). Popular Prakashan. ISBN 9788171548705.
  • Rodrigues, L. A. (1990). "The Peninsula of Salcete". In Kusuman, K. K. (ed.). A Panorama of Indian Culture: Professor A. Sreedhara Menon Felicitation Volume. Mittal Publications. pp. 231–246. ISBN 9788170992141.

External links[edit]