Schnoodle

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Schnoodle
Bonnie Schnoodle Piotrowski.jpg
A 1 -year-old female schnoodle
Foundation stock Schnauzer, poodle,
Variety status Not recognized as a standardized breed by any major kennel club.
Domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris)
A 1 year-old male Schnoodle

A schnoodle is a domestic dog. It is a cross between a schnauzer and a poodle. Schnoodle is a portmanteau combining the two breed names.

Appearance[edit]

A one-year-old female schnoodle

Schnoodles are usually a cross of the smaller breeds of schnauzer and poodle. As such, the weight of an adult schnoodle can range from 20-80 pounds. Giant Schnoodles, the larger breed created by the pairing of a Standard Poodle and Giant Schnauzer, can weigh between 65 and up to 85 or 90 pounds for the largest of adult males. Schnoodles may possess the rough hair and strong body shape of the schnauzer, or the thinner shape and the curly hair of the poodle, or any combination of these characteristics.

Crossbreed status and recognition[edit]

Schnoodles are first-generation crosses, with two purebred parents: a poodle and a schnauzer.[1][2][3] According to Newsweek, schnoodles are "rising to canine stardom."[4]

Breed associations such as the AKC, the UKC, and the CKC, do not recognize the schnoodle, or any other designer cross, as a breed. However, some major kennel clubs do accept registration of crossbreed and mixed-breed dogs for performance events such as agility and obedience. As with many other designer crosses, the popularity of schnoodles has led to a rise in puppy mills selling this cross.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Schnoodle by Carol Bobrowsky and Jim Gladden, Kennel Club Books, 2006
  2. ^ Oodles of schnoodles, US News and World Report, 23 Mar 2003
  3. ^ The Modern Kennel Conundrum , by Jon Mooallem, New York Times Magazine, 4 Feb 2007
  4. ^ I'm a 'Labradoodle' Dandy, Newsweek, 8 July 2002

External links[edit]