Talk:Reactions to Innocence of Muslims

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Removing Benghazi[edit]

Even the mainstream (including the White House Press) is now in general agreement that this was a separate, coincidental event which has virtually nothing to do with Innocence of Muslims (which has become the de facto common thread tying this article together). It has its own separate enormous article, and is no longer relevant here, in light of multiple reliable sources since it was added. So I'm getting rid of it. InedibleHulk (talk) 21:32, 2 October 2012 (UTC)

We may want to have small section to say that the Benghazi attack was initially attributed to the film but was later retracted. Everything else must go. — Hasdi Bravo • 23:11, 2 October 2012 (UTC)
A brief mention of that would be fine by me. InedibleHulk (talk) 00:21, 3 October 2012 (UTC)

I think one third of the lead is a bit much emphasis on something we're trying to explain isn't related to the article's topic. Undue weight, for sure. It'd be like explaining in Bill Clinton's lead how he didn't murder anyone. I suggest this goes in a "Libya" subsection of Diplomatic Missions. InedibleHulk (talk) 02:33, 4 October 2012 (UTC)

Hmm... I could probably cut it down further, but the undue weight can be alleviated by expanding the lede (third paragraph and beyond) to cover other protests and also the events the lead up to the mob attack in Cairo. Even though Benghazi attack is unrelated, the incident is heavily cited as a response to the film in early news reporting. Right or wrong, mob attacks and demonstration at other diplomatic facilities used the incident in both Egypt and Libya to evangelize the protestors. In reality, Cairo is the point of origin of the major protests, not Benghazi. What do you think? — Hasdi Bravo • 16:47, 4 October 2012 (UTC)
I think Cairo (and to a slightly lesser extent, Sana'a) was certainly the spark that got the story buzzing, so should be in the lead. No other events strike me as leadworthy. Benghazi certainly was heavily cited, but that information is now outdated and contradicted (like Saddam Hussein's "links" to dead newborns, 9/11 and WMD). The article is largely based on news reports, but it's not about them. Perhaps we could have a "Media Reaction" section and move it there? InedibleHulk (talk) 21:41, 4 October 2012 (UTC)
Under the Benghazi article, there is already a section "Investigation (government, intelligence, and news sources)" for this. For this article, we need a brief mention of the initial mass reporting that both Cairo and Benghazi were prompted by the film on 9/11. The protest in Sana'a and others happened two days later. Hindsight being 20/20, we now know better that the Benghazi attack is unrelated, but back then it didn't stop the protests to snowball from both incidents. The main thing is a lot of people still think otherwise, so we at least have to mention this in lede for the next few weeks or so. After that, it can be a footnote. — Hasdi Bravo • 02:15, 5 October 2012 (UTC)
  • Ok, we can remove the second paragraph if we can briefly mention the Benghazi in the first. Savvy? — Hasdi Bravo • 03:06, 5 October 2012 (UTC)
    On September 11, 2012, the U.S. diplomatic mission in Cairo, Egypt was mobbed by protestors; a group scaled the embassy wall and tore down the American flag to replace it with a black Islamic flag. This incident (and the coinciding armed attack in Benghazi that was later determined by U.S. intelligence as not prompted by the film) marked the beginning of a series of violent and non-violent protests outside U.S. and other Western diplomatic facilities across the world, apparently in response to an anti-Islamic online video known as Innocence of Muslims. However, other underlying issues of discontent have fueled both protest and violence in some countries, and expanded to other Western-related locations. The protests that continued in the ensuing weeks resulted in dozens of deaths and hundreds of injuries.

That's much better, I think. InedibleHulk (talk) 03:24, 5 October 2012 (UTC)

I agree. -- FutureTrillionaire (talk) 13:36, 5 October 2012 (UTC)
  • Guys, I did something that I believe will accomplish the above with less words AND have the additional explanation in a footnote. Check out the article now and let me know what you think. Face-grin.svgHasdi Bravo • 14:44, 5 October 2012 (UTC)
    On September 11, 2012, the U.S. diplomatic mission in Cairo, Egypt was mobbed by protestors, apparently in response to an anti-Islamic online video known as Innocence of Muslims. A group scaled the embassy wall and tore down the American flag to replace it with a black Islamic flag. This incident, and the coinciding heavily armed attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya that was widely misreported[note 1] as a similar reaction to the film, launched a series of demonstrations outside U.S. and other Western diplomatic facilities across the world. Although, other underlying issues of discontent have fueled the protests in some countries. The protests that continued in the ensuing weeks also expanded to other Western-related locations, some of which turned violent, resulting in dozens of deaths and hundreds of injuries.

Even better. InedibleHulk (talk) 19:34, 5 October 2012 (UTC)

I have boldly made a change to how the Benghazi attack is presented in the lead, too make it conform better to current knowledge. There are actually three separate elements of the controversy over how the Benghazi attack was initially characterized. Was the attack (1) spontaneous or was the attack (2) premeditated, and was the attack (3) motivated by the video. The concepts of "spontaneous attack" and "motivated by video" seem to have become conflated to such an extent that they are viewed as synonymous in some people's minds and it would be helpful if the article could parse this out a bit (without doing OR or POV). Evidence from reliable sources (e.g. The New York Times) indicates that the attackers stated to eyewitnesses that they were acting in response to the video, and also that advance planning for the attack most likely occurred and that there were no spontaneous protests taking place immediately prior to the attack. There are at least a couple of New York Times articles that support these facts, and there also may be other reliable sources. PeaceLoveHarmony (talk) 17:49, 16 May 2013 (UTC)

I restored info about Benghazi to the lead, based on info from reliable sources, e.g. The New York Times. Made some minor modifications to what had been there previously. Apparently someone removed this info, but did not explain why on the Talk page. Since numerous eyewitnesses reported that the attackers said they were acting in response to the video and since the spokesman for the attacking group stated the following day that it was in response to the video, it seems to make sense to at least mention the attack here in the lead. I also included a sentence about the political controversy in the US over the role of the video in the attack. PeaceLoveHarmony (talk) 18:42, 28 July 2013 (UTC)

Restoring info in the lede about the Benghazi attack. The info is based on highly reliable sources which are cited properly. Yet another more recent reliable source article (an in depth analysis by the New York Times) supports that the video did play a role in the initial attack: "The violence, though, also had spontaneous elements. Anger at the video motivated the initial attack. Dozens of people joined in, some of them provoked by the video and others responding to fast-spreading false rumors that guards inside the American compound had shot Libyan protesters. Looters and arsonists, without any sign of a plan, were the ones who ravaged the compound after the initial attack, according to more than a dozen Libyan witnesses as well as many American officials who have viewed the footage from security cameras." http://www.nytimes.com/projects/2013/benghazi PeaceLoveHarmony (talk) 17:35, 22 January 2014 (UTC)

The report released by the Senate Intelligence Committee on Jan. 15, 2014 took 16 months, and the bi-partisan finding on this matter clearly states that the video played no part in the Benghazi attack. See p. 32 ff of the report.[1] Chairman Issa (R-CA) states that many administration career professionals stated under oath that "there was no evidence of any kind of reaction to a video and, in fact, this was a planned attack that came quickly. That's the evidence we have by people who work for the U.S. government and were under oath."[2] The ARB Report from State Department released Dec. 20, 2012 found: "The Board concluded that no protest took place before the Special Mission and Annex attacks...."[3] In sum: there is no dispute from U.S. government sources. There was no protest about a video prior to the attack. Based on this information, I'm reverting the edits made by PeaceLoveHarmony to the lede. -- Cirrus Editor (talk) 03:34, 23 January 2014 (UTC)
There are two separate issues that are not mutually exclusive:
(1) Anger over the video and the extent to which it motivated both the initial attackers and the mob of looters and arsonists who showed up later and
(2) whether or not protesters were present at the scene prior to when the militia first attacked.
The links you provide (with the exception of Issa's TV interview) only address the second question; there was no protest prior to the attack. This is not contradicted by the text which you reverted. There are reliable sources that state the attack was motivated by anger over the video. This is an ongoing dispute and we should present a balanced view of what reliable sources are saying. The YouTube video that you linked (of the highly-partisan Mr. Issa on a TV talk show expressing his own characterization of the committee's investigation) is a reliable source that documents his opinion, but multiple articles from the New York Times that cite interviews with eyewitnesses are also reliable sources.
I have not reverted your edit, but have modified it to reflect what is in the official government sources you provided (i.e. investigations concluded no protest was present) and incorporated it into the previous version. I reviewed these sources and they do not address the issue of the extent to which anger over the video motivated the initial attackers, nor if such anger motivated the mob that arrived later. So, the statement, "Later investigations by the U.S. government confirmed that this attack was not in reaction to the video", is not supported by the sources that were provided.
Thank you for your input and I look forward to continue working with you to improve this article to reflect the current information that is available from reliable sources. PeaceLoveHarmony (talk) 19:40, 23 January 2014 (UTC)

What is the purpose of this article?[edit]

This article by its content and timing appears to be nothing more than "anti-propaganda" propaganda. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Danleywolfe (talkcontribs) 18:58, 27 October 2013 (UTC)

This entire article should be summarily deleted...it is meaningless and just propaganda. A bunch of Muslims get angry over a youtube video (reportedly) lol....should that justify an encyclopedia article? How completely ridiculous. Lets have an article citing every place on earth people get mad over racism, or homophobia, or atheism, or name your religion. Every day there is a protest somewhere, people get mad over stuff...whoopdee doo, to think that justifies a sourced article is blithering stupidity. Lets make an article citing all "Black Lives matter" protests in the United States...every single one of them. Really? Welcome to planet earth...welcome to humanity...full of angry people, on a daily basis. Remove this article from Wikipedia, it has no rational purpose. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 73.157.14.9 (talk) 07:45, 11 August 2015 (UTC)
Concur. Danleywolfe and 73.157.14.9 have it right. This is the worst of Wikipedia. 2.50.17.144 (talk) 10:34, 1 June 2016 (UTC)

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Misleading beginning of entry. =[edit]

. ==

The edit of Oct 8th 2106 seems to be a "hack" of the article. The grammar is wrong but so is the content. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 50.133.252.209 (talk) 12:31, 9 October 2016 (UTC)

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