Talk:American white ibis

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Ibis have been observes as far north as Cape Charles, VA, an area rich in aquatic life as well as agriculture. While their diet may consist mainly of crustaceans, they have been observed foraging in mowed grassy areas, consuming grubs. (108.26.77.70 (talk) 22:01, 17 May 2015 (UTC)).

Featured article American white ibis is a featured article; it (or a previous version of it) has been identified as one of the best articles produced by the Wikipedia community. Even so, if you can update or improve it, please do so.
Main Page trophy This article appeared on Wikipedia's Main Page as Today's featured article on August 7, 2014.
Article milestones
Date Process Result
October 15, 2011 Good article nominee Listed
January 18, 2012 Featured article candidate Promoted
Current status: Featured article

Untitled[edit]

  • Nice work, it can't be A-class as we don't really have anA-class review on the birds wikiproject, but it is rapidly heading to GA status. I have taken the liberty of beginning a taxonomy section as we have them in other bird Featured Articles (I've worked on a few and it'd be great to see this get there). I'll jot specific queries/to do etc. below: Casliber (talk · contribs) 21:56, 24 April 2011 (UTC)
    • Yeah, sorry. My fault. It got cleared up on the assessment page and it's a B-class article, but it's still a very good article that I think could become a GA. To paraphrase what MeegsC said on the assessment page. Expand the lead section to be more of a summary of the article, expand it so it incorporates more Central and South American information (since it's more prevalent there as opposed to the US where a lot of the information is focused), and all references to the birds name should be "White Ibis" not "white ibis."
  • Complete taxo history (look at White Stork for an idea - could include subspecies, closest relatives, fossil history ec.)
  • PS: I think Linnaeus named juvenile as separate species but need a source discussing.
  • Similar/confusing species in Description section?
  • Generally link a concept at first instance (I'll tweak bird colony).
  • Chase up hybridization. I'll try and get the fulltext of this article and have a read when I have a bit of time today.

More later - hope this helps. Casliber (talk · contribs) 21:56, 24 April 2011 (UTC)

Update[edit]

Ben, I'll take another look now and do some fine tuning. Sorry about the page revert, you somehow chopped out many messages. Casliber (talk · contribs) 04:33, 16 May 2011 (UTC)

  • I have rejigged so that the subject matter is in the order of other Good and Featured bird articles.
  • Check my diffs, and you can see I have been able to trim the text a bit. There is more.
  • I can make a range map for this species tonight.
  • Damn, this looks like a good book. Can't see it on google books though...

More as I go. Casliber (talk · contribs) 08:40, 16 May 2011 (UTC)

Headings on food[edit]

Generally in bird articles, we've placed diet and foraging (i.e. methods of eating) under one subheader "Feeding" and left it in the "Behaviour" section. Often in these articles, there is no clear-cut right or wrong way to do things, and article order and choice of headings does vary (despite my best attempts to keep them conforming as much as possible!). I do think it is nearing GA status, so Ben, if you want to nominate that's fine. I will help out where I can. Casliber (talk · contribs) 02:50, 17 May 2011 (UTC)

Nomination[edit]

So what is the process to get it nominated? benongyx (talk · contribs) 04:30, 17 May 2011 (UTC)

  • I just nominated it for both FA and GA. some of the FA are way lousier than what we have for the white ibis. so i guess lets just see how things goes. benongyx (talk · contribs) 04:45, 17 May 2011 (UTC)
Oh dear. The FAC nom will be removed. Long story but it is better to pass the GA hurdle first - once a GA then FA is indeed the goal. And I have experience at that. Casliber (talk · contribs) 09:17, 17 May 2011 (UTC)
Refs need formatting too (I'd do it myself, but a bit busy at present) eg binomials not italicised, mixture of capitalised and uncapitalised styles for article titles; even if they follow the original, they should be changed to all lc style for consistency. Jimfbleak - talk to me? 11:32, 17 May 2011 (UTC)
Hmmm, that's the new {{cite doi}} template :( - oh well, manual formatting here we come.... (sigh) Casliber (talk · contribs) 11:37, 17 May 2011 (UTC)
lots of lc, white ibis, great egret etc. Jimfbleak - talk to me? 19:32, 17 May 2011 (UTC)
Yeah, writing out the refs using {{cite web}} template is best I think. Italcising speciesand captialising all the words in journal article titles. A boring job but it makes the whole thing look more book-worthy...Casliber (talk · contribs) 00:17, 18 May 2011 (UTC)
do you know the nomination process and who deems that it is a good article? benongyx (talk · contribs) 21:00, 17 May 2011 (UTC)
Aha, I see what's happened - okay, part of the steepish learning curve :) - see Wikipedia:Good article nominations under "How to nominate a good article" - basically, one places a {{GAN}} template at the top of the page. Any uninvolved editor can come and scrutinise it and offer cometns on what needs to be improved. Basically the reviewer will look at the Wikipedia:Good article criteria and judge whether the article fits them or more work needs to be done (there generally does!) and then we have seven days to fix them. Anyone can review as long as they haven't been involved in wirting the article to date. Once that is done, WP:FAC is the next goal. That is a lot tougher. For instance, another bird, Water Rail is there now if you want to just get a feel for what an article at that stage looks like and how detailed the critiques get. Don't worry though, this article is moulding together well...Casliber (talk · contribs) 22:56, 18 May 2011 (UTC)
i just placed it up for nomination. benongyx (talk · contribs) 20:15, 24 May 2011 (UTC)

thoughts[edit]

I ran through the first few sections, and made minor changes. A couple of points

  • distribution is treated twice in the lead, needs rationalising.
  • Is Florida the highest density just in the US, or the entire range?
  • text is a bit repetitive "the White Ibis does A... The White Ibis does B," — just needs a bit of tweaking for a better flow, Cas is good at that sort of thing Jimfbleak - talk to me? 06:46, 19 May 2011 (UTC)
I've added a status section, may need expanding. Is there no proper culture for this conspicuous bird? Jimfbleak - talk to me? 07:09, 19 May 2011 (UTC)
at present, i cannot find any research paper to confirm that florida has the highest density in its entire range. no credible source. also with regards to the culture section, it was there long ago before i even came in to improve the whole article, so i left it there. i could not find any additional info on culture. benongyx (talk · contribs) 20:15, 24 May 2011 (UTC)

GA Review[edit]

This review is transcluded from Talk:American White Ibis/GA1. The edit link for this section can be used to add comments to the review.

Reviewer: Philcha (talk) 10:13, 9 July 2011 (UTC)

I'll mark Green tickY comments when I think they're resolved, highlight Red XN any that are unresolved when most others are done, and strike out any of comments that I later decide are mistaken. I'll sign each of my comments, so we can see who said what - please do the same.

I'll mark the review {{inuse}} when I'm working on it, as edit conflicts are frustrating. If you think I've forgotten to remove {{inuse}}, please leave a message at my Talk page. Please free to use {{inuse}} with your own signature when you're working.

I'll read the article through first, then give comments. --Philcha (talk) 10:13, 9 July 2011 (UTC)

Coverage[edit]

  • Green tickY I see no obvious gaps at the top level. I may have comments in specific sections. --Philcha (talk) 14:26, 9 July 2011 (UTC)

Structure[edit]

  • Good in general. --Philcha (talk) 14:26, 9 July 2011 (UTC)
  • Later we should look at the title of section "Status". --Philcha (talk) 14:26, 9 July 2011 (UTC)

Taxonomy and evolution[edit]

  • Green tickY Perhaps retitle to "Taxonomy", as I see no sign of the evolutionary history - unless you find good sources for some ancestors or siblings in the "tree of life". --Philcha (talk) 14:26, 9 July 2011 (UTC)
agree. If something does turn up we can re-examine. Casliber (talk · contribs) 20:22, 9 July 2011 (UTC)
Green tickY Thanks. Where do you get the time and energy, Casliber? --Philcha (talk) 10:25, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY I suggest "... by Linnaeus in the landmark 1758 10th edition of his Systema Naturae, ...", as "landmark" smacks of advertising. --Philcha (talk) 14:26, 9 July 2011 (UTC)
The 10th edition was the one which marks the beginning of binomial taxonomy - I am ok with leaving it out but do you think some descriptor is needed or a link enough to explain? Casliber (talk · contribs) 20:22, 9 July 2011 (UTC)
I think "landmark" needs a citation as it is a strong assertion and the article needs to explain what's so special about the 10th. --Philcha (talk) 10:25, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
I've taken it out. Casliber (talk · contribs) 14:19, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 16:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY Any other names beside Scolopax albus and Eudocimus albus in the history of it's taxonomy? E.g. Portia_fimbriata#Taxonomy and the taxonomy of other jumping spiders is full of renamings, mis-identifications, etc. --Philcha (talk) 14:26, 9 July 2011 (UTC)
not as far as I know, but will double check. Casliber (talk · contribs) 20:30, 9 July 2011 (UTC)
Smithsonian Marine Station (already cited) has a synonym Platalea ajaja, although without a taxonomic authority. --Philcha (talk) 10:25, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
I suspect it is a misapplied name (?) as the combination is used fro the Roseate Spoonbill (?) Nothing coming up on google. Will keep my eyes open. Casliber (talk · contribs) 14:19, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 14:12, 4 August 2011 (UTC)
done Casliber (talk · contribs) 20:30, 9 July 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY You could combine "It was given its current binomial name by Johann Georg Wagler in 1832 when he erected the new genus Eudocimus. It is one of two species of American ibis in the genus, the other being the Scarlet Ibis (E. ruber)", e.g. ""It was given its current binomial name ... new genus Eudocimus, whose only other species currently is ...". --Philcha (talk) 14:26, 9 July 2011 (UTC)
done Casliber (talk · contribs) 20:36, 9 July 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY "Cristina Ramo and Benjamin Busto have recommended they be classified as a single species" begs a few questions:
    • When, and is there much debate about it? --Philcha (talk) 14:26, 9 July 2011 (UTC)
Not sure, haven't seen much but definitely will explore. Casliber (talk · contribs) 20:34, 9 July 2011 (UTC)
    • Green tickY Perhaps "have tentatively recommended", per Ramo & Busto's article? --Philcha (talk) 10:25, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
changed to "proposed" Casliber (talk · contribs) 12:42, 12 July 2011 (UTC)
I changed it to "they have proposed that these birds be classified as a single species", to avoid 2 "they"s together. --Philcha (talk) 16:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
    • Green tickY Are the hybrid offspring fertile with each other and/or with both/either of the 2 parent stocks? This can be complex, e.g. see Liger and Tiglon, where: the hybrids' visible characteristics depend on the sexes of the parents; female ligons appear fully fertile while male ligons are practically infertile; female tiglons apparently produce offspring with both lions and tigers, while I don't know about male tiglons. Scarlet Ibis suggests (without inline citations) that the 2 ibises interbreed easily, with successive generations become paler pink in one area where a few Scarlets were introduced into a White territory. --Philcha (talk) 14:26, 9 July 2011 (UTC)
That suggests the hybrids are, but the florida interbreeding is not a natural hybrid zone as they are zoo escapees. Mallards do teh same with Black Ducks here in Oz too. Casliber (talk · contribs) 20:34, 9 July 2011 (UTC)
Any chance of a citation to support or oppose what Scarlet Ibis says about hybrids being fertile for several generation? If supported, this article should say e.g. "inter-breed" rather than "copulate". (Some jumping spiders copulate inter species in labs, but produce no fertile eggs) --Philcha (talk) 10:25, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
having trouble finding the Florida material. The venezuela material specifies witnessing mixed pairs and mixed mating, and seeing intermediate-plumaged birds. Have tried to keep as close to what the source reported as possible (without paraphrasing, naturally) Casliber (talk · contribs) 05:36, 15 July 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 14:12, 4 August 2011 (UTC)
    • Green tickY Should this and Scarlet Ibis merged? Or alternatively create a common article (what name?) with most of the content and small articles about the American White and the Scarlet, each giving the colouration and ecology of the relevant population? We should resolve all these issues before going any further. --Philcha (talk) 14:26, 9 July 2011 (UTC)
The standard way we talk about biology articles in birdbooks for laypeople is by species. Some well-differentiated subspecies (like Hooded Crow and Carrion Crow) were always listed separately (though those two have since been split by most). The books that I've seen have these as separate entries. The distribution, description, naming history are all easy to keep separate, and any studies in peer-reivewed literature best kept to which taxon they were on. I think most will have been on one or the other, hence keeping structure as is is most prudent. However, literature on the both definitely should go in genus article. Casliber (talk · contribs) 20:30, 9 July 2011 (UTC)
NB: To keep some sense of order and framework, and to settle arguments, the birds wikiproject has adopted the IOC bird list as a consensus reference to align with - they still regard the two as separate species. Casliber (talk · contribs) 20:32, 9 July 2011 (UTC)
So much for the "biological species" concept. IIRC Origin of Species says species are just varieties writ large. --Philcha (talk) 10:25, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY For "which is seen in at least one guidebook", how about e.g. "which has been followed by least one guidebook" (adjusted for preceding phrases if needed). --Philcha (talk) 10:25, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
Yeah I'll pay that. changed. Casliber (talk · contribs) 08:38, 11 July 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 16:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY I don't remember "Here they observed mating and pairing between the two species,as well as pale orange birds, and white ibises with occasional orange feathers" before, but it's confusing: "observed mating and pairing between the two species" seems to duplicate "... reported hybridization ..." above; and "as well as pale orange birds, and white ibises with occasional orange feathers" seems to describe a separate hybridization, and the phrasing is very poor. --Philcha (talk) 14:12, 4 August 2011 (UTC)
I went back to the source to clarify exactly what was observed, plus what has been observed elsewhere - the two descriptions of birds just indicates speculative (but pretty obvious) hybrids. I'll read it again and massage the prose. Casliber (talk · contribs) 08:56, 6 August 2011 (UTC)
Update - Hybridization is the presence of interbreeding - the evidence then follows as the authors saw (1) mixed pairs, and (2) intermediate birds. I have tried to trim a bit - do you want me to trim more?Casliber (talk · contribs) 13:53, 26 September 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. At first I thought your "... observed individuals of the two species mating and pairing, as well as hybrid ibises ..." was redundancy, but realise that it's strict empiricism. --Philcha (talk) 09:12, 29 September 2011 (UTC)

Description[edit]

  • Green tickY The 2 sources for sizes differ. I'd play safe by showing the range of size statistics, combining the 2 sources. --Philcha (talk) 10:25, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
d'oh - used the different subpage with all the size/wt ranges listed. These ranges cover the other ref too. Casliber (talk · contribs) 13:43, 26 September 2011 (UTC)
THanks. --Philcha (talk) 09:22, 29 September 2011 (UTC)
I have added some parameters including link to fulltext, jstor and issn numbers. Casliber (talk · contribs) 12:51, 12 July 2011 (UTC)
Not what I expected, but good enough. --Philcha (talk) 16:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY IMO "However, there is some sexual dimorphism in size — males average significantly larger than females, in terms of flight structure, bill size and weight. The American White Ibis has been found to be most dimorphic in terms of weight and least dimorphic in terms of flight structure" needs to be re-phrased. --Philcha (talk) 10:25, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
    • Green tickY What does "flight structure" mean? Wings and tail feathers (and parson's nose AKA pygostyle). If "flight structures" needs to appear more than once, I'd explain it the first time. --Philcha (talk) 10:25, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
I didn't add that - have reread the article and added the most salient points, and removed material about wings etc. Casliber (talk · contribs) 13:09, 12 July 2011 (UTC)
    • Green tickY I feel that better phrasing would remove the partly redundant "The American White Ibis has been found to be most dimorphic in terms of weight and least dimorphic in terms of flight structure". --Philcha (talk) 10:25, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
removed Casliber (talk · contribs) 13:09, 12 July 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 20:11, 20 September 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY "Like other species of ibis, the White Ibis flies with neck and legs outstretched, often in long, loose lines" has no citation. Does individuals share the work of cutting through the air, in the way geese do? --Philcha (talk) 10:25, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
aha, found article - reffed, and yes liekly due to aerodynamic efficiency. Casliber (talk · contribs) 05:07, 19 July 2011 (UTC)
Sorry for not noticed earlier that "Like other species of ibis, the White Ibis flies with neck and legs outstretched, often in long, loose lines or 'V' formations" is clumsy and unclear. How about e.g. "Like other species of ibis, White Ibis individuals fly with neck and legs outstretched, and groups often fly in long, loose lines or 'V' formations"? --Philcha (talk) 16:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
"The reason is unclear but may be because aerodynamic efficiency is increased" is unclear to me. Contrast the close formation of geese in flight. --Philcha (talk) 16:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
Birds of eastern and Central North America p. 51 (Roger Tory Peterson, Virginia Marie Peterson; already cited) says, "... "roller-coaster" strings, flapping and gliding, and often soar in circles", which may be more informative. --Philcha (talk) 16:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
agree - this slots nicely on the end. Casliber (talk · contribs) 03:38, 24 September 2011 (UTC)
Nice. --Philcha (talk) 09:22, 29 September 2011 (UTC)

Similar species[edit]

linked Casliber (talk · contribs) 14:21, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 17:02, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY The source says "... immature Glossy Ibis ...", i.e. immature in both cases. --Philcha (talk) 10:25, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
good catch. fixed. Casliber (talk · contribs) 14:21, 10 July 2011 (UTC)

Distribution and habitat[edit]

  • Green tickY I find the 1st para confusing, as I'm unsure which parts apply only the breeding range. --Philcha (talk) 12:01, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
rejigged to list breeding areas first, then clarify it extends further inland when nonbreeding Casliber (talk · contribs) 21:24, 18 July 2011 (UTC)
The map at White Ibis — Birds of North America Online (Cornell U., already cited) suggests that the non-breeding range extends north to Virginia and south to along the east coast of Mexico. Are your geography and eyes better than mine? --Philcha (talk) 16:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
My geography of the US isn't as good as Australia - i.e. I'm not as good as looking at a blank US map and intuiting where some of the inland states are. That said, I used the map from the journal article discussing hybridisation, which was written by scientists from South America, so adding in the breeding/non-breeding from this one makes good sense. I will adjust map accordingly. And choose an easier to see shade of light blue :/ Casliber (talk · contribs) 20:29, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 20:11, 20 September 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY "Outside the nesting season, the White Ibis’s habitat selection is highly variable ..." suggests that this ibis is more selective in the nesting season. So in which types of habitats does it nest? --Philcha (talk) 12:01, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
Hmmm, tricky - breeding habitat discussed in the appropriate section. Not sure if adding here is helpful or reduplicative....will look at lead to see if we can touch on matters there. Casliber (talk · contribs) 21:24, 18 July 2011 (UTC)
Update - read this again and overhauled - essentially the ibis moves to more coastal areas but it is because of summer flooding in the area. Material I have found on the range extending elsewhere in nonbreeding season does not go into detail about habitat. Casliber (talk · contribs) 01:08, 24 September 2011 (UTC)
I ce's to "marshes, wetlands, and mangrove swamps ..." - do UK and Oz differ on this? The section looks good. --Philcha (talk) 09:32, 29 September 2011 (UTC)

Behaviour[edit]

  • I've just noted the UK English "Behaviour". OTOH "Description" uses "molt". I suggest USA English in this article as the bird is a New World species and the sources generally use USA English. --Philcha (talk) 12:01, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
agree about US spelling being a good idea. Will try to change all Casliber (talk · contribs) 08:39, 11 July 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY I find the 1st para confusing, e.g.:
    • Green tickY At "The species' sexual dimorphism is probably a result of natural selection as being larger in size overall is able to increase both the reproductive success and survival of the male", why would this not apply to females? I don't know any one source that would survey the principles behind sexual dimorphism, but Sexual dimorphism provide sources. <OR>In mammals, males twice the size of females appear in "tournament" species ("winner takes all") as in lions and walruses, the dominant male reigns for a few years and dies soon after being deposed. Where males are less larger, serial adultery is common - for example in a general curve humans' males relative size is consistent with 1.3 females per successful males. At the other end, spider males are usually smaller and male angler fish are minute. Perhaps it may be better to skip the principles, which apply to many species, and concentrate on a full and clear account of the facts. E.g. I know the principles of sexual dimorphism for spiders but would not put them in species or genus articles. --Philcha (talk) 14:48, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
The study was on this species. Agree about section needing a cleanup. The nominator added it but I am having some trouble accessing fulltexts via university last couple of days. Now read it. Basically the author of the study wanted to investigate if males with their longer bills were more successful or fed differently to females, and his observations revealed they didn't. The rest of the article is hypothesis, but does note the bill used in mating and aggressive behaviour. Will reword section Casliber (talk · contribs) 21:11, 12 July 2011 (UTC)
Green tickY Re "... dimorphism is unclear, as to date, no differences ..." provokes a tag "when" - tags are sometimes justified :-( How about "as of July 2011"? --Philcha (talk) 16:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
Green tickY Would "no differences between the sexes in feeding success rates or the foraging behavior have been observed" be clearer. --Philcha (talk) 16:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
I simply removed date references - reads fine without any temporal qualifier. Casliber (talk · contribs) 01:13, 24 September 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 09:41, 29 September 2011 (UTC)
Green tickY Re "Furthermore, the male birds' larger size equates to increased energy requirements", how about "As males are larger, they need more food than females"? Or have I missed other implications --Philcha (talk) 16:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
both good rewordings, and used. No you weren't missing other implications Casliber (talk · contribs) 12:12, 3 August 2011 (UTC)
Now in "Foraging". --Philcha (talk) 20:11, 20 September 2011 (UTC)
Green tickY I'm afraid I find "Natural selection has been implicated as being larger and longer-billed may increase reproductive success, and the bill is used by the adult male in mating displays and fighting between males" so unclear that I can't make a suggestion. --Philcha (talk) 16:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
The paper itself focusses entirely on feeding. The mating and fighting are not explored in the article, and the sentence is somewhat speculative. I have removed it. Casliber (talk · contribs) 12:12, 3 August 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 20:11, 20 September 2011 (UTC)
    • Green tickY I can see how males' bills may be weapons in fights, but use how? E.g. rapiers, cudgels, wrestling (like antlers)? --Philcha (talk) 14:48, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
I haven't seen this discussed in the sources. The speculative sentence has been removed now anyway. Casliber (talk · contribs) 12:14, 3 August 2011 (UTC)
    • Green tickY As a result of recent removals of speculative content, this section now contains only 3 sentences, and 2 different topics: "The origin of the species' sexual dimorphism is unclear ... they need more food than females" and "The American White Ibis begins breeding in its third summer. The oldest member ... 4 months after being banded." I'd put the 1st topic in "Foraging", and the 2nd somewhere in "Breeding" ("my" invertebrate articles have a section "Reproduction and lifecycle"). --Philcha (talk) 14:12, 4 August 2011 (UTC)
      • Green tickYI placed the foraging bit in foraging, but found it difficult to slot the lifespan stuff in breeding. If goes better in description after juvenile plumage. Casliber (talk · contribs) 08:53, 6 August 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY Re "In addition, larger bills also allow the males to probe deeper in the water while foraging, thereby increasing foraging effectiveness", does the article mean, e.g., "While the larger bills are weapons in fights between males, as a by-product they enable males to probe deeper in the water while foraging" (which would the avoid duplication of "foraging"). --Philcha (talk) 14:48, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
nevermind. the author proposes that a longer bill could be more advantageous in foraging...but observes no difference in foraging behaivour or success. Casliber (talk · contribs) 12:07, 13 July 2011 (UTC)
Yep, a refutation of a hypothesis is useful in science but less commonly useful in WP. --Philcha (talk) 16:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY Re "The oldest member of the species recorded in captivity has been over 20 years of age, ...", how about "was over 20 years of age"? --Philcha (talk) 17:02, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
changed. Casliber (talk · contribs) 15:09, 11 July 2011 (UTC)

Breeding[edit]

  • Green tickY Inconsistency between "The White Ibis is a monogamous avian species which breeds in huge colonies ..." (para 1) and "Although the White Ibis is predominantly monogamous ..., the male often flies off to engage in extra pair copulation ...". --Philcha (talk) 17:02, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
"predominantly" added to lede. Casliber (talk · contribs) 13:59, 12 July 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 16:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY Re "where nests within a rookery can range from the tens to the hundreds", I'd prefer "colony" as I think "rookery" suggests rather smaller birds while an adult White Ibis is about 2 lb, and would need quite a strong bough. (I weighed 2 cans of baked beans to check how these felt, but didn't climb trees :-D) --Philcha (talk) 17:02, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
agree. removed word. Casliber (talk · contribs) 13:59, 12 July 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 16:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY I feel that sections "Mating" and "Nesting" are rather confusing, with no apparent sequence of events. How about: colony site selection (a collective decision?); pair formation (for one season or longer-term?); nest building; copulation, including adultery; any giving of food by the male to the "pregnant" female; protecting eggs and chicks, and feeding chicks; male starved; nest predators; cause of nest failure. Then we can think about number and names of sub-sections. --Philcha (talk) 17:02, 10 July 2011 (UTC)
agree. will get to it. Casliber (talk · contribs) 21:12, 12 July 2011 (UTC)
  • I've realised (doh!) that the article has been using "White Ibis" as short for "American White Ibis". I think this needs to change to "American White Ibis" or e.g. "this ibis", as there's also an Australian White Ibis! --Philcha (talk) 12:05, 11 July 2011 (UTC)
Agree, working on it. Need to sleep now. Free time patchy +++ got most I think.... Casliber (talk · contribs) 15:22, 11 July 2011 (UTC)

Have you finished the restructure of "Breeding" --Philcha (talk) 19:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)

I felt much happier about the logical flow of the section now. What do you think? Casliber (talk · contribs) 05:36, 24 July 2011 (UTC)
The logical flow is much better, thanks. --Philcha (talk) 09:32, 24 July 2011 (UTC)
In this section, the next part of the job is the prose, I'm afraid. Current faults include: redundancy, repeating a word in the same sentence, using complex words when simpler ones will do the job, and poor sentence structure. Examples:
  • Green tickY"The nests can number from the tens to the hundreds, ... as well as prey availability during the particular breeding season" has multiple faults :-( --Philcha (talk) 09:32, 24 July 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY "In periods of poor prey availability, ... than in periods of good prey availability". --Philcha (talk) 09:32, 24 July 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY rejigged previous three bits. (I didn't write 'em...) Casliber (talk · contribs) 13:59, 27 July 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickYI think "The female chooses the site and builds the nest, usually in the branches of a tree or shrub, which is often over water. The males also assist in the nest building process by bringing nest material" would be better if re-ordered so all of site selection precedes all of building. --Philcha (talk) 09:32, 24 July 2011 (UTC)
yes - rejigged. Actually had a bit of a rejig and pruning of words all over. Casliber (talk · contribs) 14:29, 27 July 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY Etc., I'm afraid. --Philcha (talk) 09:32, 24 July 2011 (UTC)

Green tickYThis section now looks OK.

Diet[edit]

  • Green tickY IMO "The American White Ibis is a bird with a generalist diet" is both redundant and probably wrong - as far I can see it's a carnivore, not an omnivore. --Philcha (talk) 19:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
    • Fixed sometime. --Philcha (talk) 15:40, 3 October 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY Re "Being small in size and having a brief nesting cycle, it has a low energy expenditure and its low energy demands can usually be met through the consumption of relatively abundant small prey":
    • "Being small in size ..." compared with what? --Philcha (talk) 19:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
    • "... has a low energy expenditure and its low energy demands can ..." compared with what? And size is not the only influence on energy expenditure, e.g. in UK in winter small birds (e.g. sparrow) lose about 30% of their weight overnight while maintaining their temperature. --Philcha (talk) 19:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
All these bits are from a paper comparing it with the larger Wood Stork. I've removed them as the comparison is not helpful to the general reader and added some useful info from the article, however I need to rejig this whole section. Will alert when done.' Casliber (talk · contribs) 04:48, 28 July 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 15:40, 3 October 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY I think "Prey includes a wide and diverse variety of aquatic organisms such as aquatic insects and small fishes, with crayfish and other crustaceans being its preferred source of food" could be more concise, e.g. "It prefers to eat crayfish and other crustaceans, but also takes aquatic insects and small fishes." My suggestion excludes "aquatic organisms" as that phrase might be interpreted to include molluscs, and as far as I can see the American White Ibis does not have the tools for molluscs except for slugs. --Philcha (talk) 19:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
yeah agreed. changed. Casliber (talk · contribs) 11:17, 28 July 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 15:40, 3 October 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY Re "Outside the nesting season, the diet is highly variable. Depending on the both region and habitat, which affects the abundance and types of prey available for consumption, the White Ibis would feed on different prey":
    • Green tickY Which White Ibis? Being an Aussie, you should show US ornithologists the errors of their ways :-D --Philcha (talk) 19:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
    • Green tickY These 2 sentences should be combined and more concise. "this Ibis" may help. --Philcha (talk) 19:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
actually alot of this bit is redundant. trimmed Casliber (talk · contribs) 11:17, 28 July 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 15:40, 3 October 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY Re "... the most frequently consumed prey are insects, such as beetles and fly larvae":
    • Green tickY I suggest "the most frequent prey are ..." --Philcha (talk) 19:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
yes, I see - "consumed" is implied in prey, hence redundant. Casliber (talk · contribs) 11:22, 28 July 2011 (UTC)
    • Green tickY Does "insects, such as beetles and fly larvae" mean only larvae of beetles? If not, I guess the easy fix is "fly larvae and beetles". --Philcha (talk) 19:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
agreed. done Casliber (talk · contribs) 11:22, 28 July 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 15:40, 3 October 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY At "In North American, crustaceans, mostly crayfish, are the main prey", I suggest e.g. "Generally in North America the main prey are crustaceans, mostly crayfish", as the following sentences are exceptions (I hope). --Philcha (talk) 19:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
good point, done Casliber (talk · contribs) 11:22, 28 July 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY "the diet would be primarily made up of crayfish, while those that feed in willow ponds ate predominantly fish. American White Ibises that feed in mangrove swamps would focus on crabs" changes to past tense to mixed for no reason. --Philcha (talk) 19:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
past tenses and subjunctives removed. Casliber (talk · contribs) 11:22, 28 July 2011 (UTC)
THanks. --Philcha (talk) 15:40, 3 October 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY At "The species is found in a mixed-species foraging flock with the Glossy Ibis (Plegadis falcinellus), and the two species select different food items with little overlap, as the latter feeds mainly on grain", see the cited source, Common Coastal Birds of Florida & the Caribbean (David W. Nellis) p. 151:
    • The overlap is in flooded fields. --Philcha (talk) 19:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
    • The White Ibis takes 48% crabs, 37% aquatic insects, 15% fish; and the Glossy takes 58% grains, 26% insects, 15% crabs. So the Glossy Ibis is an omnivore and does not prefers the White's favourite prey. --Philcha (talk) 19:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
I added the habitat and a little on the most popular prey selection - did you want to see all the precentages in the article? Casliber (talk · contribs) 11:36, 28 July 2011 (UTC)
Your change without the precentages are fine. --Philcha (talk) 15:40, 3 October 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY I think the para (almost) "Density also has a major impact on prey selection and the relationship between prey abundance and consumption and differed among various preys.... a positive relationship between density and prey catchability" could be clearer and more concise. --Philcha (talk) 19:11, 21 July 2011 (UTC)
I rewrote and relocated last para into preceding para, and moved mixed-species material to make last para. Casliber (talk · contribs) 13:07, 29 July 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 15:40, 3 October 2011 (UTC)

Green tickY The whole section looks fine now. --Philcha (talk) 15:40, 3 October 2011 (UTC)

Foraging[edit]

  • Green tickY What is (such as pecking, groping and) "head-swinging"? --Philcha (talk) 09:41, 22 July 2011 (UTC)
explained Casliber (talk · contribs) 13:34, 29 July 2011 (UTC)
Rewritten later. Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 16:56, 5 October 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY Passage "For the most part, the American White Ibis forage for food by tactile probing, ... often attacking and robbing the ibis of food, due to increased handling time" should remove redundancies (e.g. at "increases the chance of theft by other birds such Herons and Egrets, which are often found to be foraging close by and often attacking and robbing the ibis of food, due to increased handling time") and make it all clearer and most concise. --Philcha (talk) 09:41, 22 July 2011 (UTC)
first two paras reworded and redudancies removed Casliber (talk · contribs) 13:34, 29 July 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 16:56, 5 October 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY At "Depending on the time of the year and season, the American White Ibis forages in different habitats. During the summer, it roams along the coast of tidal flats and mangrove swamps as the inland marshes after usually flooded. However, as the water level recedes in the fall, populations at the coast shift their foraging area inland, where they forage in inland marshes and swamplands":
    • Green tickY Isn't "Depending on the time of the year and season, the American White Ibis forages in different habitats" redundant? --Philcha (talk) 09:41, 22 July 2011 (UTC)
--> Foraging takes place in different habitats according to season Casliber (talk · contribs) 13:37, 29 July 2011 (UTC)
      • "Foraging takes place in different habitats according to season" is shorter but still IMO redundant, as just 2 sentences explain the shift from coastal to inland foraging. --Philcha (talk) 17:26, 14 September 2011 (UTC)
on rereading, agree is redundant and hence removed Casliber (talk · contribs) 17:53, 17 September 2011 (UTC)
    • Green tickY If so, the remaining para is short. How about moving it to the beginning of the 1st para, and then adjust phrasing. --Philcha (talk) 09:41, 22 July 2011 (UTC)
    • Green tickY Re shifting their foraging, about e.g. "populations at the coast shift their foraging area inland, where they forage in inland to marshes and swamplands"? --Philcha (talk) 15:46, 5 October 2011 (UTC)
      • d'oh...obvious! done.. Casliber (talk · contribs) 09:46, 6 October 2011 (UTC)
      • Obvious only to omniscient reviews :-) --Philcha (talk) 13:16, 6 October 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY "During the breeding season, adult male ibises have been observed to steal food from both young juveniles and feeding females that are neither its own offspring nor mate instead of foraging its own food by forcing its bill down the throat of its victim and extracting the ball of food that is meant for the young juvenile ibises" is long and complex. I can't see a major improvement, but suggest 2 small ones:
    • Green tickY "adult male ibises have been observed to steal seen stealing food" --Philcha (talk) 09:41, 22 July 2011 (UTC)
done Casliber (talk · contribs) 13:46, 29 July 2011 (UTC)
    • Green tickY "instead of foraging its own food" looks redundant. --Philcha (talk) 09:41, 22 July 2011 (UTC)
removed Casliber (talk · contribs) 13:46, 29 July 2011 (UTC)
    • Green tickY After my rest, "During the breeding season, adult male ibises have been seen stealing food from young juveniles and feeding females that are neither its own offspring nor mate" confused me. How about e.g. "... adult male ibises have been seen stealing food from other males' juveniles and mates"? Your call, as I don't have full access to the source. --Philcha (talk) 17:26, 14 September 2011 (UTC)
I reread the source and came up with "During the breeding season, adult male ibises have been recorded raiding other parent ibises feeding their young in the colony. They force their bill down the throat of the victim—either the parent about to disgorge their food or recently fed young—and extract the ball of food" tried to completely rework it. Casliber (talk · contribs) 00:48, 19 September 2011 (UTC)
Erm, you didn't like the reword? Casliber (talk · contribs) 01:15, 24 September 2011 (UTC)
I feel that "During the breeding season, adult male ibises have been recorded raiding other parent ibises feeding their young in the colony" is so dense that it is very difficult to read (except as a Latin exercise :-) ). How about e.g. "During the breeding season, adult male ibises have been recorded as raiding other parent ibises who are feeding their young in the colony". --Philcha (talk) 15:46, 5 October 2011 (UTC)
And then clarity the next sentence to show which is the predator and which the victim, e.g. "The predators force their bill down the throat of the victim ... ". --Philcha (talk) 15:46, 5 October 2011 (UTC)
I preferred "raiders" as "predators" makes me think of eagles etc. did other too. Casliber (talk · contribs) 09:49, 6 October 2011 (UTC)
Fine, you pirate! --Philcha (talk) 13:16, 6 October 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY I'm afraid the rest of the para needs the same medicine. --Philcha (talk) 09:41, 22 July 2011 (UTC)
yes indeed. Now done Casliber (talk · contribs) 13:46, 29 July 2011 (UTC)
    • Green tickY At first sight IMO "For the most part, the American White Ibis forages for food by tactile probing, which is the primarily foraging technique. It wades slowly through shallow water and sticks its long, downcurved bill into the substrate of the water body with its bill held at around 1 to 2 cm (0.4-0.8 in) agape at the tip, and probes by sweeping their long bills back and forth across the bottom to pick out organisms that are suitable for consumption" could be much more concise. E.g. "The American White Ibis mainly finds food by tactile probing as it wades slowly through shallow water and, keeping its long, downcurved bill about 1-2cm (0.4-0.8in) agape, sweeps back and forth across the bottom to pick out edible organisms"?
      Then I saw that "Probing varies from shallow nibbles to deep probes, and takes place while standing or walking. On land, the American White Ibis locates prey by sight and pecks, and does not have to insert its bill into the substrate. Groping with a wide open bill is a technique used by ibis in deeper water when alone, as is head swinging. In this last the ibis swings its wide open bill widely in open water. Other American White Ibis copy this type of foraging if they see one ibis doing it" looks partly repetition." Perhaps tactile probingfrom "... tactile probing ..." to the end of the para needs to be restructure to show foraging in water (long) and land (short). --Philcha (talk) 17:26, 14 September 2011 (UTC)
Okay, rejigged now - so it runs - normal probing/mention standing still/groping in deeper water/land Casliber (talk · contribs) 22:50, 19 September 2011 (UTC)
Flows well. --Philcha (talk) 13:16, 6 October 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY Para "Smaller prey items are sought when other birds are around, ... forage for food together at the peripheral region of the group" seems to contain part that have little to do with each other:
    • Green tickY "Smaller prey items are sought ... rob the ibis of its catch." IMO this has a few issues:
      • Green tickY My impression from para 1 (? mistakenly) is that the American White Ibis takes small food anyway. If so, how smaller prey can it take when robbers are around? --Philcha (talk) 22:04, 14 September 2011 (UTC)
they really really try to avoid bigger items which get stolen. Casliber (talk · contribs) 17:50, 17 September 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. ---Philcha (talk) 13:16, 6 October 2011 (UTC)
      • Green tickY Perhaps it should be part of the 1st para. --Philcha (talk) 22:04, 14 September 2011 (UTC)
paras rejigged Casliber (talk · contribs) 17:50, 17 September 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 13:16, 6 October 2011 (UTC)
      • Green tickY I'm sure "Smaller prey items are sought ... rob the ibis of its catch" can be written better, and avoid the passive voice. E.g. "When other birds such as herons and egrets are around, the American White Ibis prefers smaller prey ...". --Philcha (talk) 22:04, 14 September 2011 (UTC)
passive --> active done Casliber (talk · contribs) 17:50, 17 September 2011 (UTC)
    • Green tickY "Juveniles have lower foraging efficiency ... at the peripheral region of the group". Is this a partial defence against robbery by males? --Philcha (talk) 22:04, 14 September 2011 (UTC)
the author of the study noted some stealing of food by adults but stopped short of drawing firm conclusions and recommended further study. Did suggest were forced to feed in less favourable areas but stated ultimately unclear. Casliber (talk · contribs) 18:04, 17 September 2011 (UTC)
OK. --Philcha (talk) 13:16, 6 October 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY "The origin of the species' sexual dimorphism is unclear as, to date, no differences between the sexes in feeding success rates or the foraging behavior have been observed, and as males are larger, they need more food than females" looks unrelated to anything else, and perhaps a partial contradiction of the item about males' stealing from unrelated juveniles and females. Don't the sources talk to each other? Would seeing who cites whom help to show developments in understanding of this species' behaviour? Any ideas? --Philcha (talk) 22:04, 14 September 2011 (UTC)
One has to go on what the sources say - this study looked at foraging behaviour to see if it could find anything which could explain the size difference (i.e.different success rates etc.). It couldn't. I can't speculate on what is not there. I don't recall seeing it gelled with other data. sorry. Casliber (talk · contribs) 21:01, 15 September 2011 (UTC)
OK. --Philcha (talk) 16:56, 5 October 2011 (UTC)

Status[edit]

  • Green tickY This mini-lead needs prose improvement, e.g. "The American White Ibis is classed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List, as this bird has a large population ...." --Philcha (talk) 10:35, 24 July 2011 (UTC)
rejigged Casliber (talk · contribs) 13:28, 18 August 2011 (UTC)
3 "sentences" separated by semi-colons - "The American White Ibis is classed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List; the population consists of 150,000 mature adults, and is stable, although some populations have unknown trends; in North America there has been an almost six-fold increase in the last four decades." I'd make "The American White Ibis ... Least Concern on the IUCN Red List" 1 sentence. For the rest, I think are at least apparent inconsistencies in the text. BirdLife International includes a few IMO crucial works: "The overall population trend is stable"; and "these surveys cover less than 50% of the species's range in North America". IMO the options are: remove the item about the increase in North America; or say that this static is based on surveys that cover less that 50% of the NA range. --Philcha (talk) 22:02, 3 October 2011 (UTC)
agreed. done and done Casliber (talk · contribs) 08:56, 4 October 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 09:41, 4 October 2011 (UTC)

Human impact[edit]

  • Green tickY How about e.g. "In the Everglades ecosystem, human pollution has led to increased concentrations of methylmercury, a globally distributed neurotoxin and endocrine disruptor, which has reduced the American White Ibis' behavior,[1] including its foraging efficiency.[1] Recent research has found that increased exposure to methylmercury reduces juveniles' foraging efficiency.[2]".
  • Green tickY "Moreover, consumption of methylmercury in the diet also affects the hormone levels within the male bird, ... approached by fewer females during the mating season":
    • Do you think "Moreover, consumption of methylmercury in the diet also affects the hormone levels within the male bird, ... approached by fewer females during the mating season" should be in the next para, which describes gay males. --Philcha (talk) 10:35, 24 July 2011 (UTC)
    • Either way (oops!), please similarly copyedit for "Moreover, consumption of methylmercury in the diet also affects the hormone levels within the male bird, ... approached by fewer females during the mating season." --Philcha (talk) 10:35, 24 July 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY I'm sorry, the rest of the section also needs a copyedit. --Philcha (talk) 10:35, 24 July 2011 (UTC)
copyedited whole bit now and incorporated ideas above. Casliber (talk · contribs) 14:00, 29 July 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 14:06, 29 September 2011 (UTC)

In culture[edit]

  • Green tickY I've copyedited, what you you thnk of the result? --Philcha (talk) 10:35, 24 July 2011 (UTC)
looks ok Casliber (talk · contribs) 05:23, 30 July 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 05:46, 15 October 2011 (UTC)
  • What does "sponsored an ibis entry in the college's homecoming celebration" mean - a real bird, a copy of the official mascot, or what? --Philcha (talk) 10:35, 24 July 2011 (UTC)
Not sure - it is capitalised in the source so I guess it must be the mascot Casliber (talk · contribs) 05:25, 30 July 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY Is "John Stormont was the first person to be Sebastian Hall's back in 1958" relevant? --Philcha (talk) 10:35, 24 July 2011 (UTC)
probably not - removed Casliber (talk · contribs) 14:02, 29 July 2011 (UTC)
Hmmm, that one is a bit bloggy -will forego it and use the following one. Casliber (talk · contribs) 02:31, 14 October 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY Google for "Eudocimus albus" mascot miami just got me The tale of the ibis, which says the mascot is Eudocimus albus, leaving no doubt. The source is controlled by University of Miami - yippee! --Philcha (talk) 13:27, 29 September 2011 (UTC)
added Casliber (talk · contribs) 02:44, 14 October 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 05:46, 15 October 2011 (UTC)

Dead links and DAB pages[edit]

I'll check with User:Dispenser/Checklinks and the DAB checker when the content is stable. --Philcha (talk) 10:13, 9 July 2011 (UTC)

think I got all the dablinks Casliber (talk · contribs)
  • Checklinks looks OK all to "Human impact". To check "In culture" when agreed. --Philcha (talk) 17:44, 13 October 2011 (UTC)
  • Dab links looks OK all to "Human impact". To check "In culture" when agreed. --Philcha (talk) 17:44, 13 October 2011 (UTC)

Images[edit]

Green tickY Images OK. --Philcha (talk) 05:52, 15 October 2011 (UTC)

Lead[edit]

  • Green tickY Taxobox fine. --Philcha (talk) 19:21, 20 September 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY "Being sexually dimorphic, males are larger than females" looks like a explanation, but I doubt that - in some species the females are larger (eggs need space), T rex females were apparently large, and female spider are larger. --Philcha (talk) 18:42, 13 October 2011 (UTC)
Ah, just dropped the technical term as I don't think it adds much here. rejigged a little. Casliber (talk · contribs) 01:23, 14 October 2011 (UTC)
OK. -Philcha (talk) 16:24, 14 October 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY "The non-breeding range extends further inland ..." looks clumsy after the previous sentence - how about e.g. "Outside the breeding period, the range extends further inland ...". --Philcha (talk) 18:42, 13 October 2011 (UTC)
done, and see below Casliber (talk · contribs) 01:23, 14 October 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY "Outside the breeding season, the American White Ibis is found in a variety of wetland habitats, ..." has no contrasting point about breeding environs. --Philcha (talk) 18:42, 13 October 2011 (UTC)
dropped as more complicated than previously thought (see body of text as discussed above), slotted breeding colonies bit into breeding range. Casliber (talk · contribs) 01:23, 14 October 2011 (UTC)
  • Green tickY I'd make "Predominantly monogamous, the American White Ibis pairs up ... to lower reproduction rates" a separate para, as it's about mating rather than diet. --Philcha (talk) 18:42, 13 October 2011 (UTC)
Hmmm, but the last bit goes into enviro pollution, which isn't strictly diet or breeding either...? I do see where you're coming from but two paras covers alot of diverse material. Will muse on this Okay, actually pollution bit impacts on breeding behaviour so does slot in if paras split - para 2 now split. Casliber (talk · contribs) 01:23, 14 October 2011 (UTC)
Thanks. --Philcha (talk) 05:56, 15 October 2011 (UTC)

Please also see "In culture". --Philcha (talk) 03:54, 14 October 2011 (UTC)

Comments from User:Stemonitis[edit]

A few things, mostly nitpicking, but some of more importance:

  • "It is the first known case of adult multiple nest-attending breeding behavior that has documented for the species." Apart from the grammatical problems, it is unclear to me if this is noteworthy. Has there been one report for this species, or is this the only species to do something?
It is not unique, but is an unusual behaviour among bird species, so is notable. I trimmed it and adjoined it to previous setence with an mdash. I like mdashes Casliber (talk · contribs) 22:06, 27 August 2011 (UTC)
  • "Like other species of ibis, the White Ibis flies with neck and legs outstretched, often in long, loose lines or 'V' formations. The reason is unclear but may be because aerodynamic efficiency is increased." could probably be made more concise: "Like other species of ibis, the White Ibis flies with neck and legs outstretched, often in long, loose lines or 'V' formations, which may improve the birds' aerodynamic efficiency."
Yeah, I'll go with that. Casliber (talk · contribs) 23:17, 27 August 2011 (UTC)
  • "For many bird species which have sexually dimorphic nestlings, it is usually the larger sized male nestling that often experience higher mortality as a result of the parents’ inability to meet its greater nutritional needs." The verb agreement are wrong here, and either "usually" or "often" is probably superfluous.
yup, reworded (how'd I miss that?) Casliber (talk · contribs) 23:24, 27 August 2011 (UTC)
  • In the mixed-species flocks paragraph, the White Ibis is said to be looking for crabs, whereas up until that point, it had been mostly eating crayfish. Isn't this a contradiction? They are quite different animals.
ah, I added 'there' to clarify - the crab bit of diet is in the flooded fields with the glossy ibis. Casliber (talk · contribs) 23:47, 27 August 2011 (UTC)
  • "It is unclear whether the fish are more easily caught if overcrowded, or whether sheer numbers of fish mean that ibises are catching them instead of crayfish statistically". Can ibises catch fish statistically?
was trying to think of another adverb to go here, but I think "sheer numbers gives the gist of the meaning without a need for an adverb (?) Casliber (talk · contribs) 05:32, 28 August 2011 (UTC)
  • "It would wading slowly through shallow water and sticking its long, downcurved bill into the substrate". More grammar issues.
rejigged Casliber (talk · contribs) 23:50, 27 August 2011 (UTC)
  • "a 590% increase" - perhaps better worded as "a nearly six-fold increase"?
ok. done Casliber (talk · contribs) 05:32, 28 August 2011 (UTC)
I have gone through so that every reference has at least one online indexing link, whether it be doi or jstor. Casliber (talk · contribs) 20:38, 28 August 2011 (UTC)
Yeah, I noticed that is a glitch with cite doi, an otherwise very useful template....fixed x 3 Casliber (talk · contribs) 05:29, 28 August 2011 (UTC)

--Stemonitis (talk) 12:00, 26 August 2011 (UTC)

  • This review's been open nearly three months. Surely we're just about done with this? Wizardman Operation Big Bear 13:25, 13 September 2011 (UTC)
    • Wizardman, the delay is on my side (reviewer) - I was doing 3 GA reviews when reviews 2 of "my" nominations appearence at the same time. At at the end of Aug I moved house. The situation is returning to normal, and tomorrow (14 September) I will have the time and energy to resume work on this review. --Philcha (talk) 19:36, 13 September 2011 (UTC)
    • I'm back ;-) Commentents are in the usual parts of the review. --Philcha (talk) 17:26, 14 September 2011 (UTC)


It's a GA![edit]

Casliber, many thanks for the all work you've done to improve this article. --Philcha (talk) 06:43, 15 October 2011 (UTC)

(audible sigh of relief) - thanks for the thorough review. Casliber (talk · contribs) 13:46, 15 October 2011 (UTC)

Pre FAC - things I might have missed....[edit]

Placeholder - given how much time I spent on this goddamn article, may as well go the whole hog...Casliber (talk · contribs) 13:37, 21 November 2011 (UTC)

To check:

Title: Aquatic prey switching and urban foraging by the White Ibis Eudocimus albus are determined by wetland hydrological conditions Author(s): Dorn Nathan J.; Cook Mark I.; Herring Garth; et al. Source: IBIS Volume: 153 Issue: 2 Pages: 323-335 DOI: 10.1111/j.1474-919X.2011.01101.x Published: APR 2011

 Done added. Casliber (talk · contribs) 14:52, 16 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: Survival of White Ibises (Eudocimus albus) in response to chronic experimental methylmercury exposure Author(s): Frederick Peter; Campbell Ashley; Jayasena Nilmini; et al. Source: ECOTOXICOLOGY Volume: 20 Issue: 2 Pages: 358-364 DOI: 10.1007/s10646-010-0586-9 Published: MAR 2011 Times Cited: 0 (from Web of Science)

 Done added. Casliber (talk · contribs) 14:35, 16 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: ERECTION OF IBIRHYNCHUS GEN. NOV (ACANTHOCEPHALA: POLYMORPHIDAE), BASED ON MOLECULAR AND MORPHOLOGICAL DATA Author(s): Garcia-Varela Martin; Perez-Ponce de Leon Gerardo; Aznar Francisco J.; et al. Source: JOURNAL OF PARASITOLOGY Volume: 97 Issue: 1 Pages: 97-105 DOI: 10.1645/GE-2350.1 Published: FEB 2011 Times Cited: 0 (from Web of Science)

Not done covered in summary in another article. there are 51 parasites so the segment will look awfully listy....Casliber (talk · contribs) 14:07, 16 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: SENSITIVITY OF NESTING GREAT EGRETS (ARDEA ALBA) AND WHITE IBISES (EUDOCIMUS ALBUS) TO REDUCED PREY AVAILABILITY Author(s): Herring Garth; Gawlik Dale E.; Cook Mark. I.; et al. Source: AUK Volume: 127 Issue: 3 Pages: 660-670 DOI: 10.1525/auk.2010.09144 Published: JUL 2010 Times Cited: 3 (from Web of Science)

 Done already added. Casliber (talk · contribs) 14:54, 16 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: The White Ibis and Wood Stork as indicators for restoration of the everglades ecosystem Author(s): Frederick Peter; Gawlik Dale E.; Ogden John C.; et al. Source: ECOLOGICAL INDICATORS Volume: 9 Pages: S83-S95 DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolind.2008.10.012 Published: NOV 2009 Times Cited: 4 (from Web of Science)

 Done added. Casliber (talk · contribs) 11:54, 16 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: SUBLETHAL EFFECTS OF METHYLMERCURY ON FECAL METABOLITES OF TESTOSTERONE, ESTRADIOL, AND CORTICOSTERONE IN CAPTIVE JUVENILE WHITE IBISES (EUDOCIMUS ALBUS) Author(s): Adams Evan M.; Frederick Peter C.; Larkin Iske L. V.; et al. Source: ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY Volume: 28 Issue: 5 Pages: 982-989 Published: MAY 2009 Times Cited: 2 (from Web of Science)

Not done possibly too specialised. Casliber (talk · contribs) 15:08, 16 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: Sex-related Mortality of White Ibis (Eudocimus albus) Nestlings During a Starvation Event Author(s): Adams Evan M.; Frederick Peter C. Source: WATERBIRDS Volume: 32 Issue: 1 Pages: 123-127 DOI: 10.1675/063.032.0114 Published: MAR 2009 Times Cited: 0 (from Web of Science)

 Done already added. Casliber (talk · contribs) 11:38, 16 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: Bias in aerial estimates of the number of nests in White Ibis and Great Egret colonies Author(s): Williams Kathryn A.; Frederick Peter C.; Kubilis Paul S.; et al. Source: JOURNAL OF FIELD ORNITHOLOGY Volume: 79 Issue: 4 Pages: 438-447 DOI: 10.1111/j.1557-9263.2008.00197.x Published: DEC 2008 Times Cited: 1 (from Web of Science)

Not done possibly too specialised. Casliber (talk · contribs) 15:26, 16 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: Estimation of Crayfish Abundance and Size-structure in Diets of White Ibis Chicks Author(s): Dorn Nathan J.; Herring Garth; Gawlik Dale E. Source: WATERBIRDS Volume: 31 Issue: 3 Pages: 417-423 Published: SEP 2008 Times Cited: 5 (from Web of Science)

 Done already added. Casliber (talk · contribs) 11:39, 16 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: Patagifer lamothei n. sp (Digenea: Echinostomatidae: Nephrostominae) from the white ibis Eudocimus albus (Threskiornithidae) from Texas, USA Author(s): Dronen Norman O.; Blend Charles K. Source: REVISTA MEXICANA DE BIODIVERSIDAD Volume: 79 Pages: 23S-32S Published: AUG 2008 Times Cited: 1 (from Web of Science)

 Done added Casliber (talk · contribs) 20:29, 17 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: Effects of methylmercury and spatial complexity on foraging behavior and foraging efficiency in juvenile white ibises (Eudocimus albus) Author(s): Adams Evan M.; Frederick Peter C. Source: ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY Volume: 27 Issue: 8 Pages: 1708-1712 DOI: 10.1897/07-466.1 Published: AUG 2008 Times Cited: 5 (from Web of Science)

 Done already added. Casliber (talk · contribs) 11:40, 16 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: Sex determination for the Great Egret and White Ibis Author(s): Herring Garth; Gawlik Dale E.; Beerens James M. Source: WATERBIRDS Volume: 31 Issue: 2 Pages: 298-303 DOI: 10.1675/1524-4695(2008)31[298:SDFTGE]2.0.CO;2 Published: JUN 2008 Times Cited: 1 (from Web of Science)

 Done already added. Casliber (talk · contribs) 11:42, 16 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: Seabird nesting and conservation in the northern Bahamas Author(s): Kushlan James A.; Steinkamp Melanie J. Source: WATERBIRDS Volume: 30 Issue: 4 Pages: 613-623 DOI: 10.1675/1524-4695(2007)030[0613:SNACIT]2.0.CO;2 Published: DEC 2007 Times Cited: 1 (from Web of Science)

Not done covered in secondary source by same author elsewhere. Casliber (talk · contribs) 15:24, 16 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: Waterbirds (other than Laridae) nesting in the middle section of Laguna Cuyutlan, Colima, Mexico Author(s): Mellink Eric; Riojas-Lopez Monica E. Source: REVISTA DE BIOLOGIA TROPICAL Volume: 56 Issue: 1 Pages: 391-397 Published: MAR 2008 Times Cited: 1 (from Web of Science)

 Done added. Casliber (talk · contribs) 04:19, 17 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: Willets kleptoparasitize and use White Ibis as "Beaters" Author(s): Davis William E. Jr.; Jackson Jerome A. Source: WILSON JOURNAL OF ORNITHOLOGY Volume: 119 Issue: 4 Pages: 758-760 DOI: 10.1676/06-047.1 Published: DEC 2007 Times Cited: 0 (from Web of Science)

 Done added. Casliber (talk · contribs) 11:36, 16 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: Selection for sexual bill dimorphism in ibises: An evaluation of hypotheses Author(s): Babbitt Gregory A.; Frederick Peter C. Source: WATERBIRDS Volume: 30 Issue: 2 Pages: 199-206 DOI: 10.1675/1524-4695(2007)30[199:SFSBDI]2.0.CO;2 Published: JUN 2007 Times Cited: 3 (from Web of Science)

Not done focusses on Scarlet Ibis. added to that article Casliber (talk · contribs) 15:34, 16 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: Multiple nest-tending Behavior in an adult female white ibis Author(s): Herring Garth; Gawlik Dale E. Source: WATERBIRDS Volume: 30 Issue: 1 Pages: 150-151 DOI: 10.1675/1524-4695(2007)030[0150:MNBIAA]2.0.CO;2 Published: MAR 2007 Times Cited: 0 (from Web of Science)

 Done already added. Casliber (talk · contribs) 15:34, 16 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: White Ibis integument color during the breeding season Author(s): Heath JA; Frederick PC Source: JOURNAL OF FIELD ORNITHOLOGY Volume: 77 Issue: 2 Pages: 141-150 DOI: 10.1111/j.1557-9263.2006.00034.x Published: SPR 2006 Times Cited: 3 (from Web of Science)

 Done added. Casliber (talk · contribs) 21:52, 16 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: Distribution of wading birds relative to vegetation and water depths in the northern Everglades of Florida, USA Author(s): Bancroft GT; Gawlik DE; Rutchey K Source: WATERBIRDS Volume: 25 Issue: 3 Pages: 265-277 DOI: 10.1675/1524-4695(2002)025[0265:DOWBRT]2.0.CO;2 Published: SEP 2002 Times Cited: 22 (from Web of Science)

Not done more general and nothing really to add not already in article. Casliber (talk · contribs) 04:40, 17 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: Long-term movement patterns for seven species of wading birds Author(s): Melvin SL; Gawlik DE; Scharff T Source: WATERBIRDS Volume: 22 Issue: 3 Pages: 411-416 DOI: 10.2307/1522117 Published: 1999 Times Cited: 8 (from Web of Science)


Not done not an easy one to generalise from. Casliber (talk · contribs)

Title: Wetland feeding site use by White Ibises (Eudocimus albus) breeding in coastal South Carolina Author(s): DeSanto TL; Johnston JW; Bildstein KL Source: COLONIAL WATERBIRDS Volume: 20 Issue: 2 Pages: 167-176 Published: 1997 Times Cited: 4 (from Web of Science)

 Done added. Casliber (talk · contribs) 04:40, 17 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: Philopatry and nomadism: Contrasting long-term movement behavior and population dynamics of White Ibises and Wood Storks Author(s): Frederick PC; Ogden JC Conference: Symposium on Wetland Feeding Site Use by White Ibises (Eudocimus albus) Breeding in Coastal South Carolina Location: CHARLESTON, SC Date: 1996 Source: COLONIAL WATERBIRDS Volume: 20 Issue: 2 Pages: 316-323 DOI: 10.2307/1521699 Published: 1997 Times Cited: 10 (from Web of Science)

 Done added. fascinating paper. Casliber (talk · contribs) 05:09, 17 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: Conservation of large, nomadic populations of White Ibises (Eudocimus albus) in the United States Author(s): Frederick PC; Bildstein KL; Fleury B; et al. Source: CONSERVATION BIOLOGY Volume: 10 Issue: 1 Pages: 203-216 DOI: 10.1046/j.1523-1739.1996.10010203.x Published: FEB 1996 Times Cited: 25 (from Web of Science)

 Done added. Casliber (talk · contribs) 12:08, 17 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: Resource partitioning between Glossy and White Ibises in a rice field system in southcentral Cuba Author(s): Acosta M; Mugica L; Mancina C; et al. Source: COLONIAL WATERBIRDS Volume: 19 Issue: 1 Pages: 65-72 DOI: 10.2307/1521808 Published: 1996 Times Cited: 12 (from Web of Science)

Not done material it covers has already been added and cited to secondary source. Casliber (talk · contribs) 12:08, 17 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: FORAGING SOCIABILITY OF NESTING WADING BIRDS (CICONIIFORMES) AT LAKE OKEECHOBEE, FLORIDA Author(s): SMITH JP Source: WILSON BULLETIN Volume: 107 Issue: 3 Pages: 437-451 Published: SEP 1995 Times Cited: 18 (from Web of Science)

Not done nothing significant or definitive to add. Casliber (talk · contribs) 12:15, 17 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: SARCOCYSTIS SP IN WADING BIRDS (CICONIIFORMES) FROM FLORIDA Author(s): SPALDING MG; ATKINSON CT; CARLETON RE Source: JOURNAL OF WILDLIFE DISEASES Volume: 30 Issue: 1 Pages: 29-35 Published: JAN 1994 Times Cited: 8 (from Web of Science)

 Done added Casliber (talk · contribs) 07:49, 17 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: HEMOPARASITES OF WADING BIRDS (CICONIIFORMES) IN FLORIDA Author(s): TELFORD SR; SPALDING MG; FORRESTER DJ Source: CANADIAN JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY-REVUE CANADIENNE DE ZOOLOGIE Volume: 70 Issue: 7 Pages: 1397-1408 DOI: 10.1139/z92-196 Published: JUL 1992 Times Cited: 6 (from Web of Science)

 Done added Casliber (talk · contribs) 07:16, 17 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: THE RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF BIOTIC AND ABIOTIC VECTORS IN NUTRIENT TRANSPORT Author(s): BILDSTEIN KL; BLOOD E; FREDERICK P Source: ESTUARIES Volume: 15 Issue: 2 Pages: 147-157 DOI: 10.2307/1352688 Published: JUN 1992 Times Cited: 22 (from Web of Science)

 Done added Casliber (talk · contribs) 20:29, 17 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: FORAGING ECOLOGY OF 7 SPECIES OF NEOTROPICAL IBISES (THRESKIORNITHIDAE) DURING THE DRY SEASON IN THE LLANOS OF VENEZUELA Author(s): FREDERICK PC; BILDSTEIN KL Source: WILSON BULLETIN Volume: 104 Issue: 1 Pages: 1-21 Published: MAR 1992 Times Cited: 20 (from Web of Science)

Title: LOW GENETIC DIFFERENTIATION BETWEEN 2 DISJUNCT WHITE IBIS COLONIES Author(s): STANGEL PW; RODGERS JA; BRYAN AL Source: COLONIAL WATERBIRDS Volume: 14 Issue: 1 Pages: 13-16 DOI: 10.2307/1521273 Published: 1991 Times Cited: 5 (from Web of Science)

Not done genetic finding which supports the findings of ibis movement also in the article. Not sure it makes the article clearer by including it but might if others think worthwhile. Casliber (talk · contribs) 20:36, 17 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: SUSPECTED INTRASPECIFIC EGG DUMPING IN THE WHITE IBIS (EUDOCIMUS-ALBUS) Author(s): FREDERICK PC; SHIELDS MA Source: WILSON BULLETIN Volume: 98 Issue: 3 Pages: 477-478 Published: SEP 1986 Times Cited: 1 (from Web of Science)

Not done - a hard one. Having read the article now, I'd have to veer in the negative as it is a little far from being confirmed. Casliber (talk · contribs) 20:11, 17 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: HEMATOZOA AND MALLOPHAGA FROM THE WHITE IBIS, EUDOCIMUS-ALBUS L IN FLORIDA Author(s): FORRESTER DJ Source: JOURNAL OF PARASITOLOGY Volume: 66 Issue: 1 Pages: 58-58 DOI: 10.2307/3280589 Published: 1980 Times Cited: 2 (from Web of Science)

"" Done added. Casliber (talk · contribs) 21:39, 16 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: POLYCYCLORCHIS-EUDOCIMI GEN-ET-SP-N (TREMATODA-CYCLOCOELIDAE) FROM TRACHEA OF WHITE-IBIS, EUDOCIMUS-ALBUS-L Author(s): PENCE DB; BUSH AO Source: JOURNAL OF PARASITOLOGY Volume: 59 Issue: 1 Pages: 85-89 DOI: 10.2307/3278576 Published: 1973 Times Cited: 3 (from Web of Science)

Not done covered in summary in another article. there are 51 parasites so the segment will look awfully listy.. Casliber (talk · contribs) 15:10, 16 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: TETRAMERES (GYNAECOPHILA) WILLIAMSI SP-N (NEMATODA-TETRAMERIDAE) FROM WHITE IBIS, EUDOCIMUS-ALBUS, WITH NOTES ON TETRAMERES-(TETRAMERES)-GRUSI SHUMAKOVICH FROM SANDHILL CRANE, GRUS-CANADENSIS Author(s): BUSH AO; PENCE DB; FORRESTE.DJ Source: JOURNAL OF PARASITOLOGY Volume: 59 Issue: 5 Pages: 788-792 DOI: 10.2307/3278406 Published: 1973 Times Cited: 9 (from Web of Science)

Not done covered in summary in another article. there are 51 parasites so the segment will look awfully listy..Casliber (talk · contribs) 15:10, 16 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: HYPOPI (ACARINA HYPODERIDAE) FROM SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUES OF WHITE IBIS, EUDOCIMUS-ALBUS L Author(s): PENCE DB Source: JOURNAL OF PARASITOLOGY Volume: 57 Issue: 6 Pages: 1321-& DOI: 10.2307/3277992 Published: 1971 Times Cited: 10 (from Web of Science)

 Done added. Casliber (talk · contribs) 20:29, 16 December 2011 (UTC)

Title: THE WHITE IBIS, EUDOCIMUS-ALBUS (LINN), HOST FOR THE DIPLOSTOMATID TREMATODE FIBRICOLA-CRATERA (BARKER AND NOLL, 1915( DUBOIS, 1932, IN LOUISIANA Author(s): LUMSDEN RD Source: JOURNAL OF PARASITOLOGY Volume: 47 Issue: 6 Pages: 897-897 DOI: 10.2307/3275011 Published: 1961 Times Cited: 3 (from Web of Science)

Not done covered in summary in another article. there are 51 parasites so the segment will look awfully listy.. Casliber (talk · contribs) 15:10, 16 December 2011 (UTC)

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