2002 San Francisco Giants season

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2002 San Francisco Giants
2002 NL Wildcard berth
2002 NL Champions
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s) Peter Magowan
General manager(s) Brian Sabean
Manager(s) Dusty Baker
Local television KTVU
(Mike Krukow, Joe Angel, Jon Miller, Lon Simmons, Duane Kuiper)
FSN Bay Area
(Mike Krukow, Duane Kuiper)
Local radio KNBR
(Mike Krukow, Lon Simmons, Tim McCarver, Jon Miller, Joe Angel)
KZSF
(Erwin Higueros, Amaury Pi-Gonzalez)
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The 2002 San Francisco Giants season was the 120th in franchise history, and the franchise's 45th season in San Francisco. The season ended with the Giants winning the National League pennant but losing to the Anaheim Angels in the 2002 World Series.

The Giants finished the regular season with a record of 95–66, 2 12 games behind the Arizona Diamondbacks in the National League West standings. By virtue of having the best record among second-place teams in the National League, they won the NL wild card to earn a postseason berth.

In the postseason, the Giants faced the Atlanta Braves in the National League Division Series. After being brought to the brink of elimination, the Giants won Games 4 and 5 to clinch the series, three games to two. They went on to defeat the St. Louis Cardinals in the National League Championship Series by a series score of four games to one to win the franchise's 20th NL championship and its third in San Francisco. Then, in the World Series, they brought the Angels to the brink of elimination before the Angels came from behind to win Games 6 and 7.

2002 was manager Dusty Baker's tenth and final season managing the Giants. Following the season he departed to manage the Chicago Cubs.

Offseason[edit]

  • November 28, 2001: Wayne Gomes was released by the San Francisco Giants.[1]
  • December 16, 2001: Tsuyoshi Shinjo was traded by the New York Mets with Desi Relaford to the San Francisco Giants for Shawn Estes.[2]
  • December 18, 2001: Jason Schmidt was signed as a Free Agent with the San Francisco Giants.[3]
  • January 25, 2002: David Bell was traded by the Seattle Mariners to the San Francisco Giants for Desi Relaford and cash.[4]

Regular season[edit]

Barry Bonds passes Harmon Killebrew for seventh on the all-time home run list on May 13, 2002.

Opening Day starters[edit]

  • SP- Liván Hernández
  • C- Benito Santiago
  • 1B- J. T. Snow
  • 2B- Pedro Feliz
  • SS - Rich Aurilia
  • 3B- David Bell
  • LF- Barry Bonds
  • CF- Tsuyoshi Shinjo
  • RF- Reggie Sanders [5]

Season standings[edit]

NL West W L GB Pct.
Arizona Diamondbacks 98 64 .605
San Francisco Giants 95 66 .590
Los Angeles Dodgers 92 70 6 .568
Colorado Rockies 73 89 25 .451
San Diego Padres 66 96 32 .407

Transactions[edit]

  • June 4, 2002: Matt Cain was drafted by the San Francisco Giants in the 1st round (25th pick) of the 2002 amateur draft. Player signed June 26, 2002.[6]
  • July 28, 2002: Kenny Lofton was traded by the Chicago White Sox to the San Francisco Giants for Felix Diaz and Ryan Meaux (minors).
  • September 4, 2002: Bill Mueller was traded by the Chicago Cubs with cash to the San Francisco Giants for Jeff Verplancke (minors).[7]

Roster[edit]

2002 San Francisco Giants
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders Manager

Coaches

Player stats[edit]

Batting[edit]

Starters by position[edit]

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI

Other batters[edit]

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI

Pitching[edit]

Starting pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Jensen, RyanRyan Jensen 32 171.2 13 8 4.51 105

Other pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO

Relief pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO

National League Divisional Playoffs[edit]

San Francisco Giants vs. Atlanta Braves[edit]

San Francisco wins the series, 3-2

Game Home Score Visitor Score Date Stadium Series
1 Atlanta 5 San Francisco 8 October 2 Turner Field 1-0 (SFO)
2 Atlanta 7 San Francisco 3 October 3 Turner Field 1-1
3 San Francisco 2 Atlanta 10 October 5 Pacific Bell Park 2-1 (ATL)
4 San Francisco 8 Atlanta 3 October 6 Pacific Bell Park 2-2
5 Atlanta 1 San Francisco 3 October 7 Turner Field 3-2 (SFO)

National League Championship Series[edit]

Game 1[edit]

October 9: Busch Stadium, St. Louis, Missouri

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
San Francisco 1 4 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 9 11 0
St. Louis 0 1 0 0 2 2 0 1 0 6 11 0
WP: Kirk Rueter (1-0)   LP: Matt Morris (0-1)   Sv: Robb Nen (1)
Home runs:
SFG: Kenny Lofton (1), David Bell (1), Benito Santiago (1)
STL: Albert Pujols (1), Miguel Cairo (1), J. D. Drew (1)

Game 2[edit]

October 10: Busch Stadium, St. Louis, Missouri

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
San Francisco 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 4 7 0
St. Louis 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 6 0
WP: Jason Schmidt (1-0)   LP: Woody Williams (0-1)   Sv: Robb Nen (2)
Home runs:
SFG: Rich Aurilia 2 (2)
STL: Eduardo Pérez (1)

Game 3[edit]

October 12: Pac Bell Park, San Francisco, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
St. Louis 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 5 6 1
San Francisco 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 4 10 0
WP: Chuck Finley (1-0)   LP: Jay Witasick (0-1)   Sv: Jason Isringhausen (1)
Home runs:
STL: Mike Matheny (1), Jim Edmonds (1), Eli Marrero (1)
SFG: Barry Bonds (1)

Game 4[edit]

October 13: Pac Bell Park, San Francisco, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
St. Louis 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 12 0
San Francisco 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 X 4 4 1
WP: Tim Worrell (1-0)   LP: Rick White (0-1)   Sv: Robb Nen (3)
Home runs:
STL: None
SFG: Benito Santiago (2)

Game 5[edit]

October 14: Pac Bell Park, San Francisco, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
St. Louis 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 9 0
San Francisco 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 7 0
WP: Tim Worrell (2-0)   LP: Matt Morris (0-2)

World series[edit]

Main article: 2002 World Series

Game 1[edit]

October 19, 2002 at Edison International Field of Anaheim in Anaheim, California

San Francisco won 4-3 at Edison International Field of Anaheim (now Angel Stadium of Anaheim) to take a 1-0 lead. Barry Bonds hit a home run in his first career World Series at-bat. He was one of three Giants to homer in the game (the other two were Reggie Sanders and JT Snow). Troy Glaus hit 2 home runs for the Angels.

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
San Francisco 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 4 6 0
Anaheim 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 3 9 0
WP: Jason Schmidt (1-0)   LP: Jarrod Washburn (0-1)   Sv: Robb Nen (1)
Home runs:
SFG: Barry Bonds (1), Reggie Sanders (1), J. T. Snow (1)
ANA: Troy Glaus 2 (2)

Game 2[edit]

October 20, 2002 at Edison International Field of Anaheim in Anaheim, California

Anaheim won 11-10 at home in a game where the lead kept fluctuating between the two teams, tying up the series. Bonds again hit a mammoth homer with 2 outs in the 9th inning, off of Troy Percival. The biggest home run of the night, however, was hit by Tim Salmon, a longtime Angel, with 2 outs and one on in the bottom of the 8th. The dramatic blast won the game for the Angels.

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
San Francisco 0 4 1 0 4 0 0 0 1 10 12 1
Anaheim 5 2 0 0 1 1 0 2 X 11 16 1
WP: Francisco Rodríguez (1-0)   LP: Félix Rodríguez (0-1)   Sv: Troy Percival (1)
Home runs:
SFG: Reggie Sanders (2), David Bell (1), Jeff Kent (1), Barry Bonds (2)
ANA: Tim Salmon 2 (2)

Game 3[edit]

October 22, 2002 at Pacific Bell Park in San Francisco, California

Anaheim won 10-4 in the first game at Pacific Bell Park (now AT&T Park). The Angels batted around twice without a home run in either of their 4-run innings. Barry Bonds hit another home run, becoming the first man to homer in his first 3 World Series games.

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Anaheim 0 0 4 4 0 1 0 1 0 10 16 0
San Francisco 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 4 6 2
WP: Ramón Ortiz (1-0)   LP: Liván Hernández (0-1)
Home runs:
ANA: None
SFG: Rich Aurilia (1), Barry Bonds (3)

Game 4[edit]

October 23, 2002 at Pacific Bell Park in San Francisco, California

San Francisco scored a 4-3 victory to tie the series. NLCS MVP Benito Santiago tied the game with a single in the 5th inning after the Angels walked Barry Bonds with a runner on second and two outs. David Bell put the Giants ahead with an RBI single in the bottom of the 8th. The run was unearned due to Anaheim catcher Bengie Molina's passed ball during the previous at-bat, allowing J. T. Snow to move to second.

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Anaheim 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 10 1
San Francisco 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 X 4 12 1
WP: Tim Worrell (1-0)   LP: Francisco Rodríguez (1-1)   Sv: Robb Nen (2)
Home runs:
ANA: Troy Glaus (3)
SFG: None

Game 5[edit]

October 24, 2002 at Pacific Bell Park in San Francisco, California

San Francisco took a 16-4 blowout win in a game in which the Angels never led. The most well-known moment in this game occurred when Giants first baseman J. T. Snow scored off a Kenny Lofton triple. 3-year-old batboy Darren Baker, son of Giants manager Dusty Baker, ran to home plate to collect Lofton's bat before the play was completed and was quickly lifted by the jacket by Snow as he crossed the plate, with David Bell close on his heels. Had Snow not acted quickly, Darren could have been seriously injured.

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Anaheim 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 4 10 2
San Francisco 3 3 0 0 0 2 4 4 X 16 16 0
WP: Jason Schmidt (2-0)   LP: Jarrod Washburn (0-2)
Home runs:
ANA: None
SFG: Jeff Kent 2 (3), Rich Aurilia (2)

Game 6[edit]

October 26, 2002 at Edison International Field of Anaheim in Anaheim, California

The turning point in the series came in Game 6. Leading 5-0 with one out in the bottom of the 7th inning, 8 outs away from the Giants' first World Series title in San Francisco, Giants manager Dusty Baker pulled starting pitcher Russ Ortiz for setup man Félix Rodríguez after Ortiz gave up consecutive singles to third baseman Troy Glaus and designated hitter Brad Fullmer. In a widely publicized move, Baker gave Ortiz the game ball as he sent him back to the dugout. During the pitching change the Rally Monkey came on the JumboTron, sending 45,037 Angels fans into a frenzy. Angel first baseman Scott Spiezio came to the plate and fouled off pitch after pitch before finally hitting a 3-run home run that barely cleared the wall in right field. The rally continued in the 8th inning, as Angel center fielder Darin Erstad hit a leadoff line-drive home run, followed by consecutive singles by Tim Salmon and Garret Anderson. (Chone Figgins pinch ran for Salmon.) When Bonds misplayed Anderson's shallow left field bloop single, Figgins and Anderson took third and second respectively. With no outs, two runners in scoring position and now only a 5-4 lead, Baker brought in closer Robb Nen to pitch to Glaus, hoping that Nen could induce a strikeout that might yet preserve the Giants' slim lead. However, Glaus slugged a double to the left-center field gap over Bonds' head to drive in the tying and winning runs. In the 9th inning, Angels closer Troy Percival struck out Rich Aurilia to preserve the 6-5 victory in front of the jubilant home crowd.

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
San Francisco 0 0 0 0 3 1 1 0 0 5 8 1
Anaheim 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 X 6 10 1
WP: Brendan Donnelly (1-0)   LP: Tim Worrell (1-1)   Sv: Troy Percival (2)
Home runs:
SFG: Shawon Dunston (1), Barry Bonds (4)
ANA: Scott Spiezio (1), Darin Erstad (1)

Game 7[edit]

October 27, 2002 at Edison International Field of Anaheim in Anaheim, California

Game 7 proved to be somewhat anticlimactic after the drama of Game 6. The Giants scored the first run on a sacrifice, but the Angels responded with a run-scoring double from catcher Bengie Molina and a 3-run double to right field from left fielder Garret Anderson to open a 4-1 lead. Rookie starting pitcher John Lackey maintained that lead. In the 9th inning, closer Troy Percival provided some tense moments as he opened the inning by putting two Giants on base, with only one out. But Tsuyoshi Shinjo – the first Japanese player in a World Series game - struck out swinging, and Kenny Lofton, also representing the tying run, flied out to Darin Erstad in right-center field to end the Series. The Angels won Game 7, 4-1, to claim their franchise's first and so far only World Series Championship. John Lackey became the first rookie pitcher to win a World Series game 7 since 1909.[8]

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
San Francisco 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 0
Anaheim 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 X 4 5 0
WP: John Lackey (1-0)   LP: Liván Hernández (0-2)   Sv: Troy Percival (3)

Awards and honors[edit]

All-Star Game

Farm system[edit]

Level Team League Manager
AAA Fresno Grizzlies Pacific Coast League Lenn Sakata
AA Shreveport Swamp Dragons Texas League Mario Mendoza
A San Jose Giants California League Bill Hayes
A Hagerstown Suns South Atlantic League Mike Ramsey
Short-Season A Salem-Keizer Volcanoes Northwest League Fred Stanley
Rookie AZL Giants Arizona League Bert Hunter

[10][11]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Preceded by
St. Louis Cardinals
2001
NL Wild Card
2002
Succeeded by
Florida Marlins
2003
Preceded by
Arizona Diamondbacks
2001
National League Championship Season
2002
Succeeded by
Florida Marlins
2003