1921 World Series

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1921 World Series
Players and umps at 1921 World Series.jpg
Yankees player Roger Peckinpaugh, Giants player Dave Bancroft, and umpires at the Polo Grounds.
Team (Wins) Manager Season
New York Giants (5) John McGraw 94–59, .614, GA: 4
New York Yankees (3) Miller Huggins 98–55, .641, GA: 4 12
Dates: October 5–13
Radio: KDKA (Pittsburgh)
WBZ (Springfield)
WJZ (Newark)
KDKA coverage was live, and direct, from the Polo Grounds. WBZ coverage was relayed via studio re-creation. WJZ, according to "Popular Radio," covered the games live, with some play by play done by Grantland Rice.[1]
Radio announcers: KDKA and WJZ: Grantland Rice
WBZ re-created by Tommy Cowan
Umpires: Cy Rigler (NL), George Moriarty (AL), Ernie Quigley (NL), Ollie Chill (AL)
Hall of Famers: Giants: John McGraw (mgr.), Dave Bancroft, Jesse Burkett (coach), Frankie Frisch, George Kelly, Ross Youngs.
Yankees: Miller Huggins (mgr.), Frank Baker, Babe Ruth.
 < 1920 World Series 1922 > 
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The much-anticipated 1921 World Series featured John McGraw's New York Giants, dedicated practitioners of the dead-ball era's "inside game", and the New York Yankees, who relied on the "power game" exemplified by Babe Ruth, who was coming off of what was arguably his best year ever statistically. The Series was a closely contested matchup which ended on a double play featuring a baserunning miscue.

Background[edit]

The Series was the last of the experimental best-five-of-nine series, which the Giants won five games to three. All eight games were played at the Polo Grounds in upper Manhattan, New York, each team alternating as the nominal "home team" since the Yankees had subleased the stadium from the Giants for the 1913 through 1922 seasons, so that it was the home park for both teams during the regular season in those ten years. This marked the first time in World Series history that the series occurred at a single site. It happened again the following year in the same place with the same two teams, and in 1944 at St. Louis' Sportsman's Park between the Cardinals and the Browns. For New Yorkers, this was the first subway Series in World Series history. It was also the first World Series to be broadcast on radio, with Grantland Rice covering the games live through Pittsburgh's KDKA. It was rebroadcast on WBZ) in Massachusetts. Announcer Tommy Cowan also recreated the games over Westinghouse-owned WJZ in Newark as he listened to phoned-in reports from the stadium.[2]

Because of an infected arm and a bad knee (which he wrenched in Game 5), Babe Ruth played only part-time in the series and did not start the final game, appearing only in the bottom of the ninth pinch-hitting for first baseman Wally Pipp. Following the Series, Ruth and Bob Meusel did some postseason barnstorming, against the rules for Series participants at that time. Both were suspended for a number of games at the start of the 1922 season. Ruth filed a personal appeal with Commissioner Landis, who upheld their suspensions but agreed to rescind the rule effective the end of that season.

Then New York Governor Nathan L. Miller, described as "a big baseball fan" by the New York Times, made plans to attend games as a guest of the National Commission (the Commissioner of Baseball).[3] The Series drew fans to New York City from across the continent, from as far west as California and Mexico to as far south as Cuba. Hotels were booked up, and both the New York Central and Pennsylvania Railroads made plans to add cars and run their trains in sections if necessary to handle the extra traffic expected. Harry L. Davis, then the Governor of Ohio, was expected to attend the games as were several other VIPs of the time.[4]

This was the fourth World Series for Giants' assistant coach "Eee-yah!" Hughey Jennings, who had managed young Ty Cobb and the pennant-winning but Series-losing 1907, 1908 & 1909 Detroit Tigers and had been brought in as an assistant coach for the Giants by John McGraw the previous October after Jennings had resigned from the Tigers. The two were teammates on the old Baltimore Orioles in earlier seasons.[5]

Several players on both teams didn't start the 1921 season with either the Giants or the Yankees, and several others moved to other teams during the regular season earlier that year. For the Giants, Johnny Rawlings, Irish Meusel, Casey Stengel and Red Causey started the season as Philadelphia Phillies, who finished last in the National League that year. Outfielder Bill Cunningham had played for the Seattle Rainiers of the Pacific Coast League, nor did Cozy Dolan or Red Shea start the season with the Giants, while the Yankees acquired outfielder Elmer Miller and pitcher Tom Rogers during the season. Nonparticipants from either team in the Series included Curtis Walker, Lee King, Johnny Monroe, Rube Benton, Goldie Rapp, Ping Bodie, Tom Sheehan and Tom Connolly.[6]

Summary[edit]

NL New York Giants (5) vs. AL New York Yankees (3)

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance
1 October 5 New York Yankees – 3, New York Giants – 0 Polo Grounds (IV) 1:38 30,203[7]
2 October 6 New York Giants – 0, New York Yankees – 3 Polo Grounds (IV) 1:55 34,939[8] 
3 October 7 New York Yankees – 5, New York Giants – 13 Polo Grounds (IV) 2:40 36,509[9] 
4 October 9 New York Giants – 4, New York Yankees – 2 Polo Grounds (IV) 1:38 36,372[10] 
5 October 10 New York Yankees – 3, New York Giants – 1 Polo Grounds (IV) 1:52 35,758[11] 
6 October 11 New York Giants – 8, New York Yankees – 5 Polo Grounds (IV) 2:31 34,283[12] 
7 October 12 New York Yankees – 1, New York Giants – 2 Polo Grounds (IV) 1:40 36,503[13] 
8 October 13 New York Giants – 1, New York Yankees – 0 Polo Grounds (IV) 1:57 25,410[14]

Matchups[edit]

The Polo Grounds during Game 1 of the series.

Game 1[edit]

Wednesday, October 5, 1921 at the Polo Grounds (IV) in upper Manhattan, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York (AL) 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 3 7 0
New York (NL) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0
WP: Carl Mays (1–0)   LP: Phil Douglas (0–1)

Game 2[edit]

Thursday, October 6, 1921 at the Polo Grounds (IV) in upper Manhattan, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York (NL) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2
New York (AL) 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 X 3 3 0
WP: Waite Hoyt (1–0)   LP: Art Nehf (0–1)

Pitching Ruth carefully, the Giants walked the Babe three times; but after the third walk he stole second and then third base, much to the delight of Yankee fans. But when he slid into third, he scraped his elbow severely and the site became infected.

Game 3[edit]

Friday, October 7, 1921 at the Polo Grounds (IV) in upper Manhattan, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York (AL) 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 1 0 5 8 0
New York (NL) 0 0 4 0 0 0 8 1 X 13 20 0
WP: Jesse Barnes (1–0)   LP: Jack Quinn (0–1)

After getting outscored 6-0 in the first two games of this series and falling behind 4-0 in the top of the third, the Giants tied it with four runs of their own in the bottom half. Later on, an 8 run 7th inning highlighted by Ross Youngs' bases loaded triple turned the tide as the Giants got their first win of this series. Ruth was taken out in the eighth after again scraping his elbow sliding into a base. The Yankees announced after the game that the elbow would have to be lanced and that he would not return for the rest of the Series.

Game 4[edit]

Sunday, October 9, 1921 at the Polo Grounds (IV) in upper Manhattan, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York (NL) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 4 9 1
New York (AL) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 7 1
WP: Phil Douglas (1–1)   LP: Carl Mays (1–1)
Home runs:
NYG: None
NYY: Babe Ruth (1)

Ruth suited up, but stayed on the bench during batting practice. When the game began, however, to everyone's surprise, he popped out of the dugout and jogged to his outfield position. The crowd roared. He kept touching his bandaged arm throughout the game. Despite the injury, he got two hits including a ninth-inning homer, his first World Series home run. But the Giants won the game and tied the series at 2–2.

Game 5[edit]

Monday, October 10, 1921 at the Polo Grounds (IV) in upper Manhattan, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York (AL) 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 6 1
New York (NL) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 10 1
WP: Waite Hoyt (2–0)   LP: Art Nehf (0–2)

Ruth's arm was still bandaged, but he played again. In the fourth, with the score tied 1–1, he shocked everyone by bunting and beating it out. His teammate Meusel then doubled, scoring Ruth all the way from first base for the go-ahead run in a 3-1 Yankee win.

Game 6[edit]

Tuesday, October 11, 1921 at the Polo Grounds (IV) in upper Manhattan, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York (NL) 0 3 0 4 0 1 0 0 0 8 13 0
New York (AL) 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 7 2
WP: Jesse Barnes (2–0)   LP: Bob Shawkey (0–1)
Home runs:
NYG: Irish Meusel (1), Frank Snyder (1)
NYY: Chick Fewster (1)

The Giants battled back from 3-0 and 5-3 deficits to take game 6.

Game 7[edit]

Wednesday, October 12, 1921 at the Polo Grounds (IV) in upper Manhattan, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York (AL) 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 8 1
New York (NL) 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 X 2 6 0
WP: Phil Douglas (2–1)   LP: Carl Mays (1–2)

Game 8[edit]

Thursday, October 13, 1921 at the Polo Grounds (IV) in upper Manhattan, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York (NL) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 0
New York (AL) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1
WP: Art Nehf (1–2)   LP: Waite Hoyt (2–1)

Facing elimination, Yankee manager Miller Huggins sent Ruth out to pinch-hit in the bottom of the ninth. The Babe, nursing both elbow and knee injuries, had sat out this game and missed all of Games 6 & 7. The bases were empty and the Yankees still trailed by the lone run of the game scored by the Giants in the top of the first. A HR would tie the game, and a hit or a walk would give the Yankees a chance. But Ruth grounded out, and shortly afterwards infielder Aaron Ward would make the final out of the Series, giving the Giants their first world championship since Christy Mathewson's record three complete shutouts in 1905.

Composite line score[edit]

1921 World Series (5–3): New York Giants (N.L.) over New York Yankees (A.L.)

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York Giants 2 3 4 5 0 1 9 4 1 29 71 4
New York Yankees 4 3 5 3 2 1 0 3 1 22 50 6
Total attendance: 269,977   Average attendance: 33,747
Winning player's share: $5,265   Losing player's share: $3,510[15]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Who Will Pay For Broadcasting? (1922)
  2. ^ Covil, Eric C. "Radio and its Impact on the Sports World". American Sportscasters Online. Retrieved May 6, 2007. 
  3. ^ "MILLER IGNORES O'BRIEN.: Says His Attitude on Transit Plans Is "Sufficiently Illuminating."". New York Times. October 4, 1921. p. 3. 
  4. ^ "SERIES ATTRACTING MANY VISITORS HERE: Hotels Report Lively Demand for Rooms During World's Baseball Classic. Fans Come Without Tickets. Would Be Near Babe.". New York Times. October 4, 1921. p. 20. 
  5. ^ "FOURTH FOR JENNINGS.: McGraw's Aid Has Figured, With Tigers, in Three Previous Series.". New York Times. October 4, 1921. p. 20. 
  6. ^ "LUCK FAVORS SOME; FROWNS ON OTHERS: Some Players on Both Teams Fall Heir to Unexpected Series Wealth.". New York Times. October 4, 1921. p. 20. 
  7. ^ "1921 World Series Game 1 - New York Yankees vs. New York Giants". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009. 
  8. ^ "1921 World Series Game 2 - New York Giants vs. New York Yankees". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009. 
  9. ^ "1921 World Series Game 3 - New York Yankees vs. New York Giants". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009. 
  10. ^ "1921 World Series Game 4 - New York Giants vs. New York Yankees". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009. 
  11. ^ "1921 World Series Game 5 - New York Yankees vs. New York Giants". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009. 
  12. ^ "1921 World Series Game 6 - New York Giants vs. New York Yankees". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009. 
  13. ^ "1921 World Series Game 7 - New York Yankees vs. New York Giants". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009. 
  14. ^ "1921 World Series Game 8 - New York Giants vs. New York Yankees". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009. 
  15. ^ "World Series Gate Receipts and Player Shares". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved June 14, 2009. 
  • Cohen, Richard M.; Neft, David S. (1990). The World Series: Complete Play-By-Play of Every Game, 1903–1989. New York: St. Martin's Press. pp. 87–92. ISBN 0-312-03960-3. 
  • Reichler, Joseph (1982). The Baseball Encyclopedia (5th ed.). MacMillian Publishing. p. 2129. ISBN 0-02-579010-2. 

External links[edit]