CSX Corporation

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CSX Corporation
Type Public
Traded as NYSECSX
S&P 500 Component
Dow Jones Transportation
Industry Transport
Founded 1980
Headquarters Jacksonville, Florida, U.S.
Area served Eastern United States
Key people Michael J. Ward, Chairman, President, and CEO
Services Railroad Transport
Revenue
  • Increase US$ 12.026 billion (2013) [1]
  • Decrease US$ 11.763 billion (2012) [1]
Operating income
  • Increase US$ 3.473 billion (2013) [1]
  • Decrease US$ 3.464 billion (2012) [1]
Net income
  • Increase US$ 1.864 billion (2013) [1]
  • Increase US$ 1.863 billion (2012) [1]
Total assets
  • Increase US$ 31.782 billion (2013) [2]
  • Increase US$ 30.723 billion (2012) [1]
Total equity
  • Increase US$ 10.504 billion (2013) [2]
  • Increase US$ 9.136 billion (2012) [1]
Employees Increase36,005
Subsidiaries CSX Transportation
Website http://www.csx.com/

CSX Corporation was formed in 1980 by the merger of Chessie System and Seaboard Coast Line Industries and eventually merged the various railroads owned by those predecessors into a single line that became known as CSX Transportation. Based in Richmond, Virginia, USA after the merger, in 2003 headquarters moved to Jacksonville, Florida (predecessor railroad Seaboard had also been headquartered in Jacksonville). The chairman, president, and chief executive officer since 2003 is Michael J. Ward.

The founding chairman was Prime F. Osborn III of Seaboard and the first CEO and second chairman was Hays T. Watkins Jr. of Chessie. Watkins was succeeded by John W. Snow as CEO in 1989 and as chairman in 1991. When Snow left the company in 2003 to become United States Secretary of the Treasury, Ward, who then headed CSX Transportation, was promoted to succeed him.

Subsidiary Companies[edit]

CSX's headquarters in Jacksonville, Florida

Divestitures and Discontinued Operations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "CSX CORP 2013 Annual Report Form (10-K)" (XBRL). United States Securities and Exchange Commission. February 12, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b "CSX CORP 2014 Q1 Quarterly Report Form (10-Q)" (XBRL). United States Securities and Exchange Commission. April 16, 2014. 
  3. ^ http://www.csx.com/index.cfm/about-csx/company-overview/organization/ CSX Company Organization
  4. ^ http://www.csx.com/index.cfm/about-csx/company-overview/organization/ CSX Company Organization
  5. ^ http://www.csx.com/index.cfm/about-csx/company-overview/organization/ CSX Company Organization
  6. ^ http://www.rrb.gov/pdf/bcd/bcd97-31.pdf
  7. ^ http://www.rrb.gov/pdf/bcd/bcd97-31.pdf
  8. ^ http://www.rrb.gov/pdf/bcd/bcd97-31.pdf
  9. ^ http://www.csx.com/index.cfm/about-csx/company-overview/organization/ CSX Company Organization
  10. ^ http://www.csx.com/index.cfm/about-csx/company-overview/organization/ CSX Company Organization
  11. ^ http://www.stb.dot.gov/econdata.nsf/ddcd1d0e9ffd326985256605005f697b/c76d823b38d2eea485257720004ec8cd/$FILE/2009%20Sch.250%20CSX%20%20Transportation,%20Inc..PDF Consolidated Information for Revenue Adequacy Determination
  12. ^ http://www.csx.com/index.cfm/customers/international-services/csx-de-mexico/ CSX de Mexico
  13. ^ http://media.corporate-ir.net/media_files/irol/92/92932/annual_reports/2004AR.pdf CSX Corporation 2004 Annual Report
  14. ^ http://media.corporate-ir.net/media_files/irol/92/92932/annual_reports/2008AR.pdf CSX Corporation 2008 Annual Report
  15. ^ http://www.nytimes.com/1988/12/24/business/csx-to-sell-pipeline-to-transco.html New York Times: CSX to Sell Pipeline to Transco

External links[edit]