KOffice

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KOffice
Koffice Logo.svg
KPresenter 2.3.png
KPresenter 2.3 screenshot
Original author(s) KDE, Reginald Stadlbauer
Developer(s) KDE, Thomas Zander (maintainer)[1]
Initial release October 23, 2000; 13 years ago (2000-10-23)[2]
Discontinued 2.3.3 / March 1, 2011; 3 years ago (2011-03-01)[3]
Development status Discontinued
Written in C++[4]
Operating system Unix-like, Windows
Platform Qt, KDE Platform
Size ~70 MB (compressed source code)[5]
Available in 27 languages[6]
Type Office suite
License GPL, LGPL
Website koffice.org (Offline since September 2012)[7]

KOffice is a free and open source office suite and graphics suite by KDE for Unix-like systems and Windows. KOffice contains a word processor (KWord), a spreadsheet (KSpread), a presentation program (KPresenter), and a number of other components that varied over the course of KOffice’s development.

After development began in 1997, two major versions of KOffice were released: Version 1.0 in the 2000 and 2.0 in 2009. Following internal conflicts, the majority of KOffice developers split off in 2010 – resulting in the creation of Calligra Suite. Two years later, in September 2012, the KOffice.org website went offline.[8] Vendor-supported packages containing KOffice software are still available through at least 2015; as of September 2013, the git repository containing the KOffice code was last modified directly by a human in May 2013.[9]

History[edit]

Development Sprints
Year Venue Date
2000[10] Erlangen, Germany Sep, 23–25
2007[11] Berlin, Germany Oct, 26–28
2008[12] Berlin, Germany Nov, 7–9
2009[13] Berlin, Germany Jun, 5–7
2009[14] Oslo, Norway Nov, 27–29
2010[15] Essen, Germany Jun, 11–13

First generation[edit]

Initial work on KOffice development began in 1997, by Reginald Stadlbauer[16][17] with KPresenter, followed by KWord[18] in 1998.

In 1999, KOffice was cited in testimony in the United States v. Microsoft anti-trust trial by then-Microsoft executive Paul Maritz as evidence of competition in the operating system and office suite arena.[19]

The first official release of the KOffice suite was on October 23, 2000 when it was released as part of K Desktop Environment 2.0.[2] Versions 1.1 followed in 2001,[20] 1.2 in 2002,[21] 1.3 in 2004,[22] 1.4 in 2005,[23] and 1.5[24] and 1.6 both in 2006.[25]

Second generation[edit]

KOffice underwent a major transition as part of the release of KDE Software Compilation 4 (SC4). Coinciding with the work on SC4, the KOffice team prepared a major new release – KOffice 2.0 – which used the new KDE Platform 4 libraries. Although version 2.0 was released in 2009, the release was labeled as a “platform release” which was recommended only for testers and developers, rather than production use, since the release was missing key features and applications from the previous stable release series – Kexi, Kivio, and Kugar were not included.[26]

Experimental port of KOffice 2.1 to Haiku.

This continued with version 2.1 in November, 2009. Regular end-users requiring a stable environment are still recommended by developers to use the stable 1.6 release series.[27] This version was also ported to Haiku[28] but the port was later not updated for newer KOffice versions.

In May 2010, version 2.2.0 was released and brings an unprecedented number of new features and bugfixes. Kexi was integrated again. Kivio has not yet been migrated. A new framework for effects on shapes and a new import filters for the Microsoft Office Open XML formats that are used in MS Office 2007 and later got added.[29]

Community split[edit]

The viewer for smartphones was dropped from KOffice

In mid-2010, following disagreements between the core developers,[30][31] the KOffice community split into two separate communities, KOffice and Calligra. Following arbitration with the community members several applications were renamed by both communities.[32] KOffice forked the KSpread spreadsheet utility to KCells, also the KPresenter presentation tool to KOffice Showcase, and the Karbon14 drawing tool to KOffice Artwork.

The community split coincided with the move from KDE’s Subversion repository to git. The Krita painting application, the Kexi database manager, and dedicated mobile platform GUI files were not migrated into the KOffice git repository.[33][34][35]

KOffice 2.3, released 31 December 2010,[36] along with subsequent bugfix releases (2.3.1–2.3.3[3]) was still a collaborative effort of both the KOffice and Calligra development teams.[37] An interim release, KOffice 2.3.3, was released in 2011.[citation needed]

After the developer community split, it was unclear[38] whether KOffice 2.4 or Calligra 2.4 would be the "100% official successor of the 2.3 series" of the original codebase.

Beginning with KOffice 2.4 the developers aimed to release new KOffice versions every six months in sync with SC4 releases[39] but KOffice had seen no development activity since mid-March 2012.[40] As of September 2013, Calligra has released 2.4 and 2.5 and 2.6 and 2.7, whereas KOffice 2.4 is still[citation needed] pending. After two minor commits in August 2012[41] the koffice.org website was replaced by a placeholder in early September 2012.[8] On October 22, 2012 KDE removed KOffice from their Quality Website Tools.[42]

Current status of KOffice packages[edit]

As of September 2013, at least two major Linux distributions offer KOffice packages. Patches to the KOffice 2.2 suite are being maintained by Canonical Ltd. through April 2015 for Ubuntu 10.04 LTS (aka Lucid).[2] Red Hat's RHEL v5, and clones thereof including CentOS v5 and SciLin v5 and[citation needed] OraLin, offer KOffice 1.6[3]; however, although RHEL5 (and clones) will receive security patches through 2020, the KOffice package is not in the official RHEL repository, but rather in a secondary EPEL repository for which continued maintenance is not guaranteed. Other distributions also offer KOffice 2.2 or 2.3 packages[ftp.opensuse.org/update/12.1/x86_64/koffice2-2.3.1-12.4.1.x86_64.rpm][carroll.cac.psu.edu/pub/linux/distributions/mandrakelinux/official/2011/i586/media/contrib/release/koffice-core-2.3.3-6-mdv2011.0.i586.rpm][download.fedora.redhat.com/pub/fedora/linux/updates/16/x86_64/koffice-core-2.3.3-22.fc16.x86_64.rpm][4], but without[citation needed] ongoing patches.

Components[edit]

The last formally released version of KOffice included the following components:

KWord Application Logo.svg
KWord A word processor with style sheets and frame-support for DTP-style editing of complex layouts.
KSpread Application Logo.svg
KSpread A spreadsheet application with multiple sheet support, templates and more than 100 mathematical formulae.
KPresenter Application Logo.svg
KPresenter A presentation program with image and effect support.
Kexi Application Logo.svg
Kexi An integrated data management application, designed as a Microsoft Access or FileMaker competitor. It can be used for designing and implementing databases, inserting and processing data and performing queries. It has limited compatibility with the MS Access file format.
Kivio Application Logo.svg
Kivio A programmable flowchart drawing program with dynamically loadable stencils. Developed by theKompany, which offered additional (non-free) stencils for sale.
Karbon14 Application Logo.svg
Karbon14 A vector drawing application with a variety of drawing and editing tools – formerly known as Kontour and KIllustrator.[2]
Krita Application Logo.svg
Krita A digital painting program, with some image processing features – formerly known as Krayon and KImageshop.
KChart Application Logo.svg
Kugar and KChart Integrated report and chart generators.
KFormula Application Logo.svg
KFormula An integrated mathematical formula editor.
KPlato Application Logo.svg
KPlato A project management application that can create Gantt-style charts.

Competition[edit]

The main office suite in use today is Microsoft Office.[43][44] Microsoft Office has been released for Windows and Mac OS but no version to date has been released for Linux. In addition, users of the open source operating system have typically expressed a preference for open source software.

In order to meet the demand for a Linux-based office suite, several projects have produced open source office suites for Linux, including: OpenOffice and its derivatives LibreOffice, Apache OpenOffice; as well as KOffice and Calligra Suite.[45]

Technical details[edit]

KOffice applications are developed using Qt and KDE Platform. All its components are released under free software licenses and use OpenDocument as their native file format when possible. KOffice has been[when?] released separately from KDE SC 4 and can be downloaded from KDE’s FTP server.

KOffice underwent[when?] a large overhaul to use the Flake system of components and Pigment color system, as much as possible within applications. KOffice developers planned to share as much infrastructure as possible between applications to reduce bugs and improve the user experience.[46] They also want to create an OpenDocument library for use in other KDE applications that will allow developers to easily add support for reading and outputting OpenDocument files to their applications.[47] Automating tasks and extending the suite with custom functionality can be done with D-Bus or with scripting languages like Python, Ruby, and JavaScript.[48]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "KOffice Overview". KDE. Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  2. ^ a b c "KDE 2.0 Release Announcement". KDE. 2000-10-23. Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  3. ^ a b "KOffice 2.3.3 update". Lists.kde.org. 2011-03-01. Retrieved 2013-09-19. 
  4. ^ http://svaksha.com/post/2010/KDE-Koffice-seeks-code-contributors
  5. ^ ftp://ftp.kde.org/pub/kde/stable/koffice-latest/
  6. ^ "KOffice v2.3.1". Ithov.com. 2011-01-21. Retrieved 2013-09-19. "This version of KOffice is translated to no less than 27 languages." 
  7. ^ Archived copy of the official web site at the Wayback Machine (archived August 21, 2012)
  8. ^ a b Archived copy of the official website, showing a placeholder at the Wayback Machine (archived September 9, 2012)
  9. ^ http://quickgit.kde.org/?p=koffice.git&a=commitdiff&h=5db14e770faed6e7565896a0259b1e515da2d1e7
  10. ^ Dre (2000-09-30). "German-Sponsored KOffice Meeting Report". KDE. KDE.News. Retrieved 2011-05-21. 
  11. ^ Inge Wallin and Boudewijn Rempt (2007-10-30). "Second KOffice Sprint in Berlin Focuses on Release, Polish". KDE. KDE.News. Retrieved 2011-03-16. 
  12. ^ Jos Poortvliet (2008-11-11). "KOffice Sprint 2008". KDE. KDE.News. Retrieved 2011-03-16. 
  13. ^ Boudewijn Rempt (2009-06-13). "KOffice 2009 Sprint In Berlin". KDE. KDE.News. 
  14. ^ Jos Poortvliet (2009-11-29). "Second KOffice Developer Sprint 2009 Kickoff". KDE. KDE.News. Retrieved 2011-03-16. 
  15. ^ Boudewijn Rempt (2010-06-25). "KOffice 2010 Summer Sprint Report". KDE. KDE.News. Retrieved 2011-03-16. 
  16. ^ "koffice/kpresenter". KDE. Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  17. ^ "Reginald Stadlbauer". Behind KDE. Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  18. ^ "koffice/kword". KDE. Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  19. ^ "Microsoft's 3rd man speaks out fear of KOffice". KDE. 1999-01-30. Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  20. ^ "KOffice 1.1 Release Announcement". KDE. 2001-08-28. Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  21. ^ "KDE Ships KOffice 1.2, an Integrated Office Suite for Linux/Unix". KDE.News. Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  22. ^ "KOffice 1.3 Released". KDE.News. Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  23. ^ "KOffice 1.4 Released". KDE.News. Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  24. ^ "KOffice 1.5 Released". KDE.News. Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  25. ^ "KOffice 1.6 Released". KDE.News. Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  26. ^ "KOffice 2.0.0 released". KDE. 2009-05-28. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011; 2 years ago (2011-06-07). Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  27. ^ "KOffice 2.1 released". KDE. 2009-11-24. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011; 2 years ago (2011-06-07). Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  28. ^ "KDE applications available for Haiku!". Tiltos.com. Retrieved 2013-09-19. 
  29. ^ "KOffice 2.2 Released". KDE. 2010-05-27. Archived from the original on June 17, 2011; 2 years ago (2011-06-17). Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  30. ^ "KOffice split". KDE. 2010-10-23. Retrieved 2013-05-04. 
  31. ^ "Re: KOffice split". KDE. 2010-10-26. Retrieved 2013-05-04. 
  32. ^ "KOffice arbitration is finished". KDE. Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  33. ^ "CALLIGRA_HAS_MOVED_TO_GIT". KDE. Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  34. ^ "KOFFICE_HAS_MOVED_TO_GIT.txt". KDE. Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  35. ^ "KOffice Repository". KDE. Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  36. ^ "KOffice 2.3.0 Released". KDE. 2010-12-31. Archived from the original on June 17, 2011; 2 years ago (2011-06-17). Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  37. ^ "Calligra Suite Goes Active". KDE. 2010-12-06. Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  38. ^ KOffice and Calligra development schedule. [1]. Retrieved 2013-09-15.
  39. ^ "Re: Platform support / Roadmap". KDE. Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  40. ^ "KOffice activity (Note: Script Kiddy is an automated maintenance bot, not a developer)". KDE Projects. 2012-07-18. Retrieved 2012-07-18. 
  41. ^ "KOffice activity (Note: Script Kiddy is an automated maintenance bot, not a developer)". KDE Projects. 2012-08-19. Retrieved 2012-12-04. 
  42. ^ "KDE Quality Website Tools activity". KDE Projects. 2012-10-22. Retrieved 2012-12-04. 
  43. ^ "Forrester: Microsoft Office in No Danger From Competitors". PCWorld Business Center. 2012-04-27. Retrieved 2012-05-01. 
  44. ^ David Roe (Oct 23, 2013). "Microsoft Office Is Still the Productivity Suite Leader". Archived from the original on 2013-10-24. 
  45. ^ http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/03/libreoffice-adoption-soaring-but-openoffice-still-open-source-king/
  46. ^ "KOffice 2.0 Alpha 5 Released". KDE.News. Retrieved 2013-09-19. 
  47. ^ "KOffice ODF Sprint Report". KDE.News. Retrieved 2013-09-19. 
  48. ^ Kross Scripting Framework