Khukhrain

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Khukhrain
Classification Khatri
Religions Hinduism and Sikhism
Languages Doabi, Punjabi
Populated States Punjab
Subdivisions Anand, Bhasin, Chadha, Chandok (Chandhoke, Chandhok), Chhachi (Chachi, Chhachhi): a sub section of the Kohli clan, Ghai, Kohli, Sabharwal, Sahni, Sethi, Suri.

The Khukhrain are a group of eight clans of the Khatri caste who originally hailed from the areas of the Salt Range and particularly the town of Bhera in Punjab.

Their area of origin was the Sind Sagar Doab (Indus-Jhelum interfluve) and the Jech Doab (Jhelum-Chenab interfluve) region of Pakistan that comprised Khushab, Pindi Gheb, Talagang, Chakwal, Pind Dadan Khan, Peshawar and Nowshera. The name "Doab" literally translates to "land of two rivers" ("Do" two, "Ab" river; Punjabi). In former India, Sind Sagar Doab and Jech Doab were the main region where Khukrains were in large number. The language spoken in the region was majorly Doabi. The names of the eight clans are: Anand, Bhasin, Chadha, Kohli, Sabharwal, Sahni, Sethi and Suri. Later four new subclans originated those were Chandok (Chandhoke, Chandhok, Chandiok), Chhachi (Chachi, Chhachhi): a sub section of the Kohli clan, and Ghai.

Muhmad of Ghazni period

The Khukhrain Indo-Scythians spread over Khushab, Dhune Kheb, Chakwal, Pind Dadan Khan, Peshawar, Nowshera and Lahore[1] were a powerful tribe during the attacks of Ghazni and never submitted to the foreigners but always resisted them whenever the opportunity came to their hands.[2] The clash of the Khukhrains with Mahmud of Ghazni [3] took place in his third invasion after the defeat of Jayapala, at the Battle of Bhera in 1004-5 which was a powerful stronghold of the Khukhrain,[4]

Dr Ishwari Prasad also writes that the last invasion of Mohammad was against Bhadravati (Bhera) the capital of the Khukhrains, in this area who had relieved him of his booty while,[5] returning from Somnath with a huge booty, which Mohammad plundered from the famous Shiva temple of Somnath, which certainly shook the religious sentiments of the Hindus, a certain tribe attacked him and snatched away a large part of the booty from his army,[6]

Finally when Bhera was sacked by Ghazni, Khukhrain King Biji Rai instead of submitting, committed suicide by ending his life with his own dagger [7] Jaipals son Anandpal received support of the Khukhrains against Mahmud Ghazni in 1008-9 at Wahind [8]

Religious beliefs

Most Khukhrans are Hindu or Sikh. Some are Muslim. Khukhrans of all these faiths collectively form one community. In Pakistan there continues to be a large number of Muslim Khukreins living specially in the Pakistani Punjab as is borne out by their Khukrain surnames such as Sethi, Sahni and Suri. Some scholars such as Muhammad Ikrām Chutai believe that a number of Khokharain were converted to Islam by the Sufi Baba Farid [9]

Khokran and Khokhars

Encyclopaedia Britannica notes that: "The Khokharain sub group of the 52 claims descent from a son of Manu but it is possibly named from the Khokhar Rajputs and several clan names are traced to military."[10]

See also

References

  1. ^ The Panjab Past and Present By Punjabi University Dept. of Punjab Historical Studies Published by Dept. of Punjab Historical Studies, Punjabi University., 1981 Page 195]
  2. ^ [(The Panjab Past and Present By Punjabi University Dept. of Punjab Historical Studies Published by Dept. of Punjab Historical Studies, Punjabi University., 1981 PAGE 200)
  3. ^ [The Panjab Past and Present By Punjabi University Dept. of Punjab Historical Studies Published by Dept. of Punjab Historical Studies, Punjabi University., 1981 page 200
  4. ^ The Panjab Past and Present By Punjabi University Dept. of Punjab Historical Studies Published by Dept. of Punjab Historical Studies, Punjabi University., 1981 Page 200)
  5. ^ The Panjab Past and Present By Punjabi University Dept. of Punjab Historical Studies Published by Dept. of Punjab Historical Studies, Punjabi University., 1981 Page 205)
  6. ^ The Panjab Past and Present By Punjabi University Dept. of Punjab Historical Studies Published by Dept. of Punjab Historical Studies, Punjabi University., 1981
  7. ^ The Panjab Past and Present By Punjabi University Dept. of Punjab Historical Studies Published by Dept. of Punjab Historical Studies, Punjabi University., 1981 Page 195]
  8. ^ The Panjab Past and Present By Punjabi University Dept. of Punjab Historical Studies Published by Dept. of Punjab Historical Studies, Punjabi University., 1981 page 201}
  9. ^ Babaji: Life and Teachings of Farid-ud Din Ganj-i Shakar By Muhammad Ikrām Chutai Page 433 Published by Sang-e-Meel Publications, 2006
  10. ^ Britannica: A New Survey of Universal Knowledge By Walter Yust Published by Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1952 Page 980