List of National Historic Sites of Canada in New Brunswick

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This is a list of National Historic Sites of Canada (French: Lieux historiques nationaux du Canada) in the province of New Brunswick. There are 61 National Historic Sites designated in New Brunswick, of which 8 are administered by Parks Canada (identified below by the beaver icon Beaver 1 (PSF)(retouched)(transparent).png).[1][2] The first National Historic Sites to be designated in New Brunswick were Fort Beauséjour – Fort Cumberland and Fort Gaspareaux in 1920.

This list uses names designated by the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada, which may differ from other names for these sites.

National Historic Sites[edit]

Site[1] Date(s) Designated Location Description Image
1 Chipman Hill[3][4] 1854 (c.) (completed) 1984 Saint John
45°16′26.66″N 66°3′47.43″W / 45.2740722°N 66.0631750°W / 45.2740722; -66.0631750 (1 Chipman Hill)
Symbolic of upper-middle class urban housing in Saint John during the mid-19th century; features a variety of decorative trompe-l'œil wall and ceiling murals Exterior of 1 Chipman Hill
Arts Building[5] 1827 (completed) 1951 Fredericton
45°56′53.93″N 66°38′28.65″W / 45.9483139°N 66.6412917°W / 45.9483139; -66.6412917 (Arts Building)
A classically-inspired masonry structure at the University of New Brunswick; the oldest university building in Canada still in continuous use Exterior of the Arts Building
Augustine Mound[6] 500 (c.) BCE (established) 1975 Metepenagiag Mi'kmaq Nation
46°55′48.37″N 65°49′20.06″W / 46.9301028°N 65.8222389°W / 46.9301028; -65.8222389 (Augustine Mound)
A circular ritual site surrounding a burial mound; a sacred site representative of Mi'kmaq spirituality, exhibiting Adena burial rituals
Beaubears Island Shipbuilding Beaver 1 (PSF)(retouched)(transparent).png[7] 1790 (established) 2001 Miramichi
46°58′18.34″N 65°34′17.96″W / 46.9717611°N 65.5716556°W / 46.9717611; -65.5716556 (Beaubears Island Shipbuilding)
A 24-hectare (59-acre) site featuring the remains of an early 19th-century shipyard Beaubears Island
Belmont House / R. Wilmot Home[8] 1820 (completed) 1975 Lincoln
45°54′49.39″N 66°35′14.05″W / 45.9137194°N 66.5872361°W / 45.9137194; -66.5872361 (Belmont House / R. Wilmot Home)
A large neoclassical country house associated with Robert Duncan Wilmot, a Father of Confederation
Boishébert Beaver 1 (PSF)(retouched)(transparent).png[9] 1756 (camp established) 1930 Miramichi
46°58′11.17″N 65°34′42.99″W / 46.9697694°N 65.5786083°W / 46.9697694; -65.5786083 (Boishébert)
The site of a camp on Beaubears Island where Acadians, under the leadership of Charles Deschamps de Boishébert, sought refuge from 1756 to 1760 during the Expulsion of the Acadians Monument at Boishébert
Carleton Martello Tower Beaver 1 (PSF)(retouched)(transparent).png[10] 1815 (completed) 1930 Saint John
45°15′7.53″N 66°4′33.54″W / 45.2520917°N 66.0759833°W / 45.2520917; -66.0759833 (Carleton Martello Tower)
A martello tower located across the harbour from downtown Saint John, built to protect the city from an American land attack during the War of 1812; representative of the type of coastal defence used by the British during the Napoleonic era View of Carleton Martello Tower
Chandler House / Rocklyn[11] 1831 (completed) 1971 Dorchester
45°53′54.78″N 64°30′54.56″W / 45.8985500°N 64.5151556°W / 45.8985500; -64.5151556 (Chandler House / Rocklyn)
A Classical Revival-style house associated with Edward Barron Chandler, a Father of Confederation
Charlotte County Court House[12] 1840 (completed) 1981 St. Andrews
45°4′32.47″N 67°2′57.26″W / 45.0756861°N 67.0492389°W / 45.0756861; -67.0492389 (Charlotte County Court House)
A simple wood-frame courthouse with a pedimented portico; the best preserved example in New Brunswick of the typical mid-19th century Maritime courthouse Sepia photograph of the Charlotte County Court House in 1895
Christ Church Anglican[13] 1856 (completed) 1990 Maugerville
45°52′17.08″N 66°26′46.72″W / 45.8714111°N 66.4463111°W / 45.8714111; -66.4463111 (Christ Church Anglican)
A wooden church illustrative of the eccclesiological phase of Gothic Revival architecture in Canada
Christ Church Cathedral[14] 1853 (completed) 1981 Fredericton
45°57′27″N 66°38′5.86″W / 45.95750°N 66.6349611°W / 45.95750; -66.6349611 (Christ Church Cathedral)
A cathedral whose spire is a landmark in the historic centre of Fredericton; one of the best examples of ecclesiological Gothic Revival architecture in Canada, and one which established an architectural pattern followed in the design of many churches in 19th-century Canada Exterior view of Christ Church Cathedral
Connell House[15] 1840 (completed) 1975 Woodstock
46°9′3.96″N 67°34′30.36″W / 46.1511000°N 67.5751000°W / 46.1511000; -67.5751000 (Connell House)
A Greek Revival wooden mansion distinguished by a double-height columned verandah; in the early 19th century, large homes inspired by classical temples were common in the United States, but comparatively rare in Canada Exterior view of Connell House in winter
Denys Fort / Habitation[16] 1600s (c.) (established) 1952 Shippagan
47°52′52.75″N 64°35′22.02″W / 47.8813194°N 64.5894500°W / 47.8813194; -64.5894500 (Denys Fort / Habitation)
Archaeological remains of a 17th-century French trading post Denys Fort / Habitation
Fort Beauséjour – Fort Cumberland Beaver 1 (PSF)(retouched)(transparent).png[17] 1751 (established) 1920 Aulac
45°51′52.49″N 64°17′29.62″W / 45.8645806°N 64.2915611°W / 45.8645806; -64.2915611 (Fort Beauséjour – Fort Cumberland)
A star-shaped fort that defended French interests in the Chignecto isthmus; after its capture by the British in 1755, the fort repulsed an attack by American revolutionary sympathizers in 1776, which contributed to keeping Nova Scotia in the British Empire The remains of the fort in 2006
Fort Charnisay[18] 1645 (established) 1923 Saint John
45°15′46.04″N 66°4′32.63″W / 45.2627889°N 66.0757306°W / 45.2627889; -66.0757306 (Fort Charnisay)
The site of a succession of military forts between 1645 and 1775 due to its strategic position on the western edge of the city’s harbour and overlooking the Saint John River; today the site is marked by a cairn and a boulder Plaque commemorating the series of forts that were built at this site
Fort Gaspareaux Beaver 1 (PSF)(retouched)(transparent).png[19] 1751 (established) 1920 Port Elgin
46°2′34.4″N 64°4′14.7″W / 46.042889°N 64.070750°W / 46.042889; -64.070750 (Fort Gaspareaux)
An archaeological site containing traces of a French fort; symbolic of the struggle between France and Britain for North America in the 1750s Fort Gaspareaux site in 2006
Fort Howe[20] 1777 (established) 1966 Saint John
45°16′36″N 66°04′23″W / 45.27667°N 66.07306°W / 45.27667; -66.07306 (Fort Howe)
The partial reconstruction of a fort that guarded Saint John from the American Revolutionary War through to the War of 1812; the fort's designation as a National Historic Park in 1914 marked the beginning of Canada's emerging system of National Historic Sites Blockhouse at Fort Howe
Fort Jemseg(fr)[21] 1659 (established) 1927 Jemseg
45°46′6.72″N 66°7′56.01″W / 45.7685333°N 66.1322250°W / 45.7685333; -66.1322250 (Fort Jemseg)
Site of an English trading post, captured by the Dutch in 1674
Fort La Tour(fr)[22] 1631 (established) 1923 Saint John
45°16′21.76″N 66°4′20.18″W / 45.2727111°N 66.0722722°W / 45.2727111; -66.0722722 (Fort La Tour)
An archaeological site containing the remains of a 17th-century fortified fur-trading post established by Charles de Saint-Étienne de la Tour; one of the earliest centres of the French fur trade with the Aboriginal peoples in the region Monument to Fort La Tour
Fort Nashwaak (Naxoat)[23] 1691 (established) 1924 Fredericton
45°57′40.87″N 66°37′36.07″W / 45.9613528°N 66.6266861°W / 45.9613528; -66.6266861 (Fort Nashwaak (Naxoat))
The site of a French fort that had once sat at the mouth of the Nashwaak River where it meets the Saint John River; the base of many raids against New England, one of which resulted in the Siege of Pemaquid in 1696
Fort Nerepis[24] 1659 (fort established) 1930 Grand Bay–Westfield
45°22′12″N 66°14′3.12″W / 45.37000°N 66.2342000°W / 45.37000; -66.2342000 (Fort Nerepis)
A cairn marking the approximate site of a fortified Maliseet stronghold, and then a small French fort, at the confluence of the Nerepis River and Saint John River; the remains of the fortifications and their precise locations have never been found Plaque and cairn marking the approximate location of Fort Nerepis
Fredericton City Hall[25] 1876 (completed) 1984 Fredericton
45°57′48.87″N 66°38′35.29″W / 45.9635750°N 66.6431361°W / 45.9635750; -66.6431361 (Fredericton City Hall)
A three-storey, Second Empire style town hall; the oldest municipal hall in Atlantic Canada still used for civic administration Exterior view of Fredericton City Hall
Fredericton Military Compound[26][27] 1784 (established) 1960 Fredericton
45°57′45.58″N 66°38′26.64″W / 45.9626611°N 66.6407333°W / 45.9626611; -66.6407333 (Fredericton Military Compound)
An important grouping of British colonial-era military buildings, which has served as premises for both military and government institutions for over 200 years The Soldiers' Barracks in the Fredericton Military Compound
Free Meeting House(fr)[28] 1821 (completed) 1990 Moncton
46°5′38.59″N 64°46′26.52″W / 46.0940528°N 64.7740333°W / 46.0940528; -64.7740333 (Free Meeting House)
A simple wood-frame meeting house that, as the only local place of worship at the time, was used by all denominations; a symbol of religious tolerance in the Maritimes Postcard of the Free Meeting House, c. 1940
Greenock Church[29] 1824 (completed) 1994 St. Andrews
45°4′36.8″N 67°3′13.18″W / 45.076889°N 67.0536611°W / 45.076889; -67.0536611 (Greenock Church)
A church noteworthy for its role in the development of Presbyterianism in New Brunswick; an excellent example of the Palladian style in Canadian church architecture Exterior view of Greenock Church
Hammond House[30] 1889 (completed) 1990 Sackville
45°53′58.65″N 64°22′37.16″W / 45.8996250°N 64.3769889°W / 45.8996250; -64.3769889 (Hammond House)
A house built for artist John A. Hammond and now located on the campus of Mount Allison University; an excellent example of the Queen Anne Revival Style in Canadian domestic architecture
Hartland Covered Bridge[31] 1921 (completed) 1980 Hartland
46°17′47.77″N 67°31′50.65″W / 46.2966028°N 67.5307361°W / 46.2966028; -67.5307361 (Hartland Covered Bridge)
A wooden covered bridge crossing the Saint John River; the longest existing covered bridge in the world Entrance to Hartland Bridge
Imperial / Bi-Capitol Theatre[32] 1913 (completed) 1985 Saint John
45°16′21.82″N 66°3′27.82″W / 45.2727278°N 66.0577278°W / 45.2727278; -66.0577278 (Imperial / Bi-Capitol Theatre)
An early 20th-century theatre facing onto King's Square; a nationally-significant example of a theatre built specifically for live performances Front facade of the Imperial / Bi-Capitol Theatre
La Coupe Dry Dock(fr) Beaver 1 (PSF)(retouched)(transparent).png[33] 1700s (c.) (established) 1933 Aulac
45°51′48.94″N 64°16′29.41″W / 45.8635944°N 64.2748361°W / 45.8635944; -64.2748361 (La Coupe Dry Dock)
Site may represent 18th-century Acadian construction
Loyalist House[34] 1817 (completed) 1958 Saint John
45°16′28.42″N 66°3′40.51″W / 45.2745611°N 66.0612528°W / 45.2745611; -66.0612528 (Loyalist House)
An excellent example of New England-style Federal architecture, and representative of the houses built by prosperous United Empire Loyalists; one of the oldest residences in the city and a survivor of the Great Fire, the house was maintained by five generations of the same family until 1959 Rear facade of Loyalist House
Marine Hospital[35] 1831 (completed) 1989 Miramichi
47°1′20.07″N 65°30′37.22″W / 47.0222417°N 65.5103389°W / 47.0222417; -65.5103389 (Marine Hospital)
A sandstone building with a domed cupola, overlooking the Miramichi River; the oldest surviving marine hospital in Canada Front facade of the Marine Hospital
Marysville Cotton Mill[36] 1885 (completed) 1986 Fredericton
45°58′41.65″N 66°35′19.69″W / 45.9782361°N 66.5888028°W / 45.9782361; -66.5888028 (Marysville Cotton Mill)
A four-storey, red-brick cotton mill building with a central tower; representative of the brick pier mills that were common in the Canadian textile industry
Marysville Historic District[37] 1840 (c.) (established) 1993 Fredericton
45°58′44.01″N 66°35′17.44″W / 45.9788917°N 66.5881778°W / 45.9788917; -66.5881778 (Marysville Historic District)
A former industrial community on the banks of the Nashwaak River; a rare surviving example of a 19th-century, single-industry company town with both its plant and company housing intact
McAdam Railway Station (Canadian Pacific)[38] 1901 (completed) 1976 McAdam
45°35′20.4″N 67°19′48″W / 45.589000°N 67.33000°W / 45.589000; -67.33000 (McAdam Railway Station (Canadian Pacific))
A stone, Chateau-style railway station and hotel; associated with the period of the rapid growth of the Canadian Pacific Railway and a rare surviving example of a combined station and hotel The McAdam Railway Station at the top of the railway embankment
Meductic Indian Village / Fort Meductic[39] 1600s (c.) 1924 Meductic
45°35′20.4″N 67°19′48″W / 45.589000°N 67.33000°W / 45.589000; -67.33000 (Meductic Indian Village / Fort Meductic)
The principal settlement of the Maliseet in the 17th century, and an important fur trading centre; the construction of the Mactaquac Dam in 1968 flooded the site, and the cairn marking the site was moved to nearby Fort Meductic Road The Meductic church cornerstone - the oldest religious artifact in New Brunswick
Minister's Island[40] 1889 (estate established) 1996 St. Andrews
45°35′20.4″N 67°19′48″W / 45.589000°N 67.33000°W / 45.589000; -67.33000 (Minister's Island)
The picturesque summer estate and gentleman’s farm of William Cornelius Van Horne on a 280-hectare (690-acre) island in Passamaquoddy Bay The Van Horne mansion on Minister's Island
Minister's Island Pre-contact Sites[41] 1000 (c.) BCE (established) 1978 St. Andrews
45°35′20.4″N 67°19′48″W / 45.589000°N 67.33000°W / 45.589000; -67.33000 (Minister's Island Pre-contact Sites)
Archaeological sites containing the remains of four houses and a shell midden originating from a coastal winter settlement
Miscou Island Lighthouse(fr)[42] 1856 (completed) 1974 Miscou Island
48°0′32.4″N 64°29′27.6″W / 48.009000°N 64.491000°W / 48.009000; -64.491000 (Miscou Island Lighthouse)
One of the few remaining wooden, octagonal, tapered lighthouses in Canada; among the oldest in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence region Miscou Island Lighthouse in the distance
Monument Lefebvre Beaver 1 (PSF)(retouched)(transparent).png[43] 1856 (completed) 1994 Memramcook
45°58′45.8″N 64°33′59.98″W / 45.979389°N 64.5666611°W / 45.979389; -64.5666611 (Monument Lefebvre)
Built in memory of Camille Lefebvre, who founded the first French language institution to confer university degrees in Atlantic Canada; now serves as an Acadian cultural centre The Monument Lefebvre at the top of a hill
Number 2 Mechanics' Volunteer Company Engine House[44] 1841 (completed) 1995 Saint John
45°16′24.56″N 66°3′24.61″W / 45.2734889°N 66.0568361°W / 45.2734889; -66.0568361 (Number 2 Mechanics' Volunteer Company Engine House)
The oldest remaining fire hall in Canada built to house hand-operated pumper fire engines; symbolic of the early phase in fire fighting in Canada when volunteer fire companies were the primary line of defence against fires in Victorian-era cities Front facade of the Number 2 Mechanics' Volunteer Company Engine House
Old Government House[45] 1828 (completed) 1958 Fredericton
45°57′56.52″N 66°39′21.36″W / 45.9657000°N 66.6559333°W / 45.9657000; -66.6559333 (Old Government House)
The stone Palladian-style official residence of the Lieutenant Governor; the location of a historic 1866 meeting between Governor Arthur Gordon and Premier Albert James Smith which paved the way for the colony's entry into Confederation Front facade of Old Government House with circular driveway leading to front door
Oxbow[46] 1000 BCE (c.) (community established) 1982 Metepenagiag Mi'kmaq Nation
46°56′19.6″N 65°48′40.18″W / 46.938778°N 65.8111611°W / 46.938778; -65.8111611 (Oxbow)
A site where stratified archaeological resources are buried in the silts and gravels of the Little Southwest Miramichi River bank; a unique cultural record of a 3000-year Mi’kmaq community
Partridge Island Quarantine Station[47] 1830 (established) 1974 Saint John
45°14′21.2″N 66°3′11.8″W / 45.239222°N 66.053278°W / 45.239222; -66.053278 (Partridge Island Quarantine Station)
One of two major quarantine stations in Canada in the 19th century, established to protect the citizenry from contagious diseases carried by passengers and crews of in-coming ships A Celtic cross erected on Patridge Island to commemorate Irish immigrants who died of typhus after their ocean journey
Prince William Streetscape[48] 1877 (construction after Great Fire) 1981 Saint John
45°16′16.95″N 66°3′42.59″W / 45.2713750°N 66.0618306°W / 45.2713750; -66.0618306 (Prince William Streetscape)
A concentration of architecturally notable late 19th-century public and commercial buildings within a two-block area The Bank of New Brunswick Building and the Old Post Office on Prince William Street
Rothesay Railway Station (European and North American)[49] 1860 (completed) 1976 Rothesay
45°23′21.8″N 65°59′57.07″W / 45.389389°N 65.9991861°W / 45.389389; -65.9991861 (Rothesay Railway Station (European and North American))
A railway station with stationmaster's quarters on the second storey; commemorates the development of railways in the Maritimes and is a good surviving example of a number two standard station designed by the European and North American Railway Rothesay Station in winter
Saint John City Market[50] 1876 (completed) 1986 Saint John
45°16′26.11″N 66°3′35.69″W / 45.2739194°N 66.0599139°W / 45.2739194; -66.0599139 (Saint John City Market)
A rare and notable surviving example of a 19th-century market building Exterior of the Saint John City Market
Saint John County Court House[51] 1829 (completed) 1974 Saint John
45°16′25.35″N 66°3′24.65″W / 45.2737083°N 66.0568472°W / 45.2737083; -66.0568472 (Saint John County Court House)
A neoclassical court house typical of early-19th-century, British public buildings in Canada; representative of the judicial system in the province Exterior of the Saint John County Court House
Seal Cove Smoked Herring Stands[52] 1870 (established) 1995 Grand Manan Island
44°39′6.76″N 66°50′20.66″W / 44.6518778°N 66.8390722°W / 44.6518778; -66.8390722 (Seal Cove Smoked Herring Stands)
54 wooden buildings surrounding a cove bounded by breakwaters; a cultural landscape once typical of the Maritimes, but increasingly rare today, and evocative of the Atlantic herring fishery View of several wooden buildings at Seal Cove at low tide
St. Andrews Blockhouse Beaver 1 (PSF)(retouched)(transparent).png[53] 1813 (completed) 1962 St Andrews
45°4′37.51″N 67°3′42.81″W / 45.0770861°N 67.0618917°W / 45.0770861; -67.0618917 (St. Andrews Blockhouse)
One of the few surviving Canadian examples of a War of 1812 blockhouse; built by the citizens of St. Andrews to protect the town from American raiders Exterior view of St. Andrews Blockhouse
St. Andrews Historic District[54] 1783 (town founded) 1962 St Andrews
45°4′23.37″N 67°2′50.56″W / 45.0731583°N 67.0473778°W / 45.0731583; -67.0473778 (St. Andrews Historic District)
A grid of sixty blocks comprising the original part of the present town; a fine example of a town in Canada that still reflects an 18th-century British colonial town plan Intersection of Water and King Streets in St Andrews
St. Anne's Chapel of Ease[55] 1847 (completed) 1989 Fredericton
45°57′40.01″N 66°38′54.36″W / 45.9611139°N 66.6484333°W / 45.9611139; -66.6484333 (St. Anne's Chapel of Ease)
A small Gothic Revival stone church reflective of the influence of the principles of the Cambridge Camden Society in Canada St. Anne's Chapel of Ease
St. John's Anglican Church / Stone Church[56] 1826 (completed) 1989 Saint John
45°16′34.1″N 66°3′41.67″W / 45.276139°N 66.0615750°W / 45.276139; -66.0615750 (St. John's Anglican Church / Stone Church)
An early Anglican church; one of the earliest examples of this first phase of the Gothic Revival style in Canada, known as Romantic Gothic Revival The Stone Church, as seen as the view terminus at the top of Wellington Row
St. Luke's Anglican Church[57] 1833 (completed) 1994 Quispamsis
45°26′38.19″N 65°59′17.33″W / 45.4439417°N 65.9881472°W / 45.4439417; -65.9881472 (St. Luke's Anglican Church)
A wooden church that represents one of the best examples of an Anglican church in Canada that reflects the architectural traditions of James Gibbs and Christopher Wren
St. Paul's United Church[58] 1886 (completed) 1990 Fredericton
45°57′35.5″N 66°38′43.38″W / 45.959861°N 66.6453833°W / 45.959861; -66.6453833 (St. Paul's United Church)
A former Presbyterian, now United, church; it is an excellent example of the High Victorian Gothic Revival style in Canada
St. Stephen Post Office[59] 1887 (completed) 1983 St. Stephen
45°11′33.05″N 67°16′37.67″W / 45.1925139°N 67.2771306°W / 45.1925139; -67.2771306 (St. Stephen Post Office)
A Romanesque Revival building constructed for the local post office, customs offices and internal revenue offices, and having served as the town hall since 1965, it is a fine example of the small urban post offices designed by Thomas Fuller
Tilley House[60] 1810 (completed) 1965 Gagetown
45°46′57.77″N 66°8′36.03″W / 45.7827139°N 66.1433417°W / 45.7827139; -66.1433417 (Tilley House)
A clapboard house that was the birthplace and boyhood home of Sir Samuel Leonard Tilley, a Father of Confederation
Tonge's Island[61] 1678 (established as capital) 1925 Sackville
45°51′11.18″N 64°16′39.97″W / 45.8531056°N 64.2777694°W / 45.8531056; -64.2777694 (Tonge's Island)
A settlement established in 1676 by Michel Leneuf de la Vallière, which served as the capital of Acadia from 1678 to 1684 The Missaguash River, with Tonge's Island visible in the distance among a stand of trees
Trinity Church and Rectory[62] 1789 (completed) 1977 Kingston
45°30′9.45″N 65°58′32.8″W / 45.5026250°N 65.975778°W / 45.5026250; -65.975778 (Trinity Church and Rectory)
The oldest surviving Anglican church in New Brunswick and a rare Maritimes example of a church and rectory surviving as a unit Trinity Church among the trees
William Brydone Jack Observatory[63] 1851 (completed) 1954 Fredericton
45°56′53.03″N 66°38′26.53″W / 45.9480639°N 66.6407028°W / 45.9480639; -66.6407028 (William Brydone Jack Observatory)
A wooden, octagonal tower that was the first astronomical observatory in Canada
Wolastoq[64] (Saint John River) 2011 Section of the Saint John River between Edmundston and the Bay of Fundy
45°16′0″N 66°4′0″W / 45.26667°N 66.06667°W / 45.26667; -66.06667 (Wolastoq)
A river that played an important role in 10,000 years of Maliseet history and 400 years of European settlement The Saint John River, or Wolastoq, near Kintore
York County Court House[65] 1858 (completed) 1980 Fredericton
45°57′39.58″N 66°38′14.82″W / 45.9609944°N 66.6374500°W / 45.9609944; -66.6374500 (York County Court House)
The earliest surviving New Brunswick court house constructed of brick

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada - New Brunswick, Parks Canada
  2. ^ New Brunswick, National Historic Sites of Canada - administered by Parks Canada
  3. ^ 1 Chipman Hill. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 8 February 2012.
  4. ^ "1 Chipman Hill National Historic Site of Canada". Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada. Parks Canada. Retrieved 9 February 2012. 
  5. ^ Arts Building. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 8 February 2012.
  6. ^ Augustine Mound. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 9 February 2012.
  7. ^ Beaubears Island Shipbuilding. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 9 February 2012.
  8. ^ Belmont House / R. Wilmot Home. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 9 February 2012.
  9. ^ Boishébert. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 9 February 2012.
  10. ^ Carleton Martello Tower. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 11 February 2012.
  11. ^ Chandler House / Rocklyn. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 11 February 2012.
  12. ^ Charlotte County Court House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 11 February 2012.
  13. ^ Christ Church Anglican. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 16 February 2012.
  14. ^ Christ Church Cathedral. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 16 February 2012.
  15. ^ Connell House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 18 February 2012.
  16. ^ "Denys Fort / Habitation National Historic Site of Canada". Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada. Parks Canada. Retrieved 18 February 2012. 
  17. ^ Fort Beauséjour – Fort Cumberland. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 18 February 2012.
  18. ^ Fort Charnisay. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 18 February 2012.
  19. ^ Fort Gaspareaux. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 18 February 2012.
  20. ^ Fort Howe. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 19 February 2012.
  21. ^ "Fort Jemseg National Historic Site of Canada". Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada. Parks Canada. Retrieved 19 February 2012. 
  22. ^ Fort La Tour. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 19 February 2012.
  23. ^ Fort Nashwaak (Naxoat). Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 19 February 2012.
  24. ^ Fort Nerepis. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 19 February 2012.
  25. ^ Fredericton City Hall. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 19 February 2012.
  26. ^ Fredericton Military Compound. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 19 February 2012.
  27. ^ "Fredericton Military Compound National Historic Site of Canada". Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada. Parks Canada. Retrieved 19 February 2012. 
  28. ^ Free Meeting House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 20 February 2012.
  29. ^ Greenock Church. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 20 February 2012.
  30. ^ Hammond House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 20 February 2012.
  31. ^ Hartland Covered Bridge. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 20 February 2012.
  32. ^ Imperial / Bi-Capitol Theatre. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 20 February 2012.
  33. ^ "La Coupe Dry Dock National Historic Site of Canada". Directory of Designations of National Historic Significance of Canada. Parks Canada. Retrieved 20 February 2012. 
  34. ^ Loyalist House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 20 February 2012.
  35. ^ Marine Hospital. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 20 February 2012.
  36. ^ Marysville Cotton Mill. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 20 February 2012.
  37. ^ Marysville Historic District. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 20 February 2012.
  38. ^ McAdam Railway Station (Canadian Pacific). Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 20 February 2012.
  39. ^ Meductic Indian Village / Fort Meductic. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 22 February 2012.
  40. ^ Minister's Island. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 22 February 2012.
  41. ^ Minister's Island Pre-contact Sites. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 22 February 2012.
  42. ^ Miscou Island Lighthouse. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 25 February 2012.
  43. ^ Monument Lefebvre. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 25 February 2012.
  44. ^ Number 2 Mechanics' Volunteer Company Engine House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 26 February 2012.
  45. ^ Old Government House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 26 February 2012.
  46. ^ Oxbow. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 26 February 2012.
  47. ^ Partridge Island Quarantine Station. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 26 February 2012.
  48. ^ Prince William Streetscape. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 26 February 2012.
  49. ^ Rothesay Railway Station (European and North American). Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 26 February 2012.
  50. ^ Saint John City Market. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 26 February 2012.
  51. ^ Saint John County Court House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  52. ^ Seal Cove Smoked Herring Stands. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 1 March 2012.
  53. ^ St. Andrews Blockhouse. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 1 March 2012.
  54. ^ St. Andrews Historic District. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 1 March 2012.
  55. ^ St. Anne's Chapel of Ease. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 1 March 2012.
  56. ^ St. John's Anglican Church / Stone Church. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  57. ^ St. Luke's Anglican Church. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  58. ^ St. Paul's United Church. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  59. ^ St. Stephen Post Office. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  60. ^ Tilley House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  61. ^ Tonge's Island. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  62. ^ Trinity Church and Rectory. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  63. ^ William Brydone Jack Observatory. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  64. ^ Wolastoq. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 3 May 2012.
  65. ^ York County Court House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 3 March 2012.