List of National Historic Sites of Canada in Quebec

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This is a list of National Historic Sites of Canada (French: Lieux historiques nationaux du Canada) in the province of Quebec. There are 194 National Historic Sites designated in Quebec, of which 30 are administered by Parks Canada.[1] [2] Sites in the province's two largest cities are listed separately at List of National Historic Sites of Canada in Montreal and List of National Historic Sites of Canada in Quebec City.

This list uses names designated by the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada, which may differ from other names for these sites.

National Historic Sites[edit]

Site[1] Date(s) Designated Location Description Image
Acton Vale Railway Station (Grand Trunk) [3] 1900 (completed) 1976 Acton Vale
45°38′53.85″N 72°33′50.45″W / 45.6482917°N 72.5640139°W / 45.6482917; -72.5640139 (Acton Vale Railway Station (Grand Trunk))
A small passenger terminal with dormer, turret and bellcast roof; symbolic of the expansion of the Grand Trunk Railway Exterior view of the Acton Gale Railway Station
Alert Hangar [4] 1958 (completed) 2007 La Baie
48°20′4.77″N 70°58′19.75″W / 48.3346583°N 70.9721528°W / 48.3346583; -70.9721528 (Alert Hangar)
Four large steel hangars at CFB Bagotville which, during the Cold War, housed fighter aircraft intended to counter surprise attacks by Soviet bombers; played a strategic role in the air defence of Canada Aerial of CFB Bagotville
Apitipik [5] 6000 BCE (c.) 1996 Gallichan
48°39′58.5″N 79°20′4.23″W / 48.666250°N 79.3345083°W / 48.666250; -79.3345083 (Apitipik)
Traditional summering area and sacred place for the Abitibiwinni, and the site of trading posts from 1686 to 1922
Arvida Historic District [6] 1925 (established) 2012 Arvida
48°26′0″N 71°11′0″W / 48.43333°N 71.18333°W / 48.43333; -71.18333 (Arvida Historic District)
A well-preserved example of a Canadian company town illustrating 25 years' worth of urban planning concepts, including the City Beautiful and Garden city movements; symbolic of the growth and development of the country’s aluminum industry  L'église Sainte-Thérèse-de-l'Enfant-Jésus in Arvida
Banc de Pêche de Paspébiac [7] 1783 (established) 2001 Paspébiac
48°1′16.3″N 65°15′15.3″W / 48.021194°N 65.254250°W / 48.021194; -65.254250 (Banc de Pêche de Paspébiac)
Ten buildings located on a large spit; associated with the commercial cod fishery in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence View of the sandbar from a distance
Battle of Eccles Hill [8] 1870 (battle) 1923 Frelighsburg
45°1′10″N 72°54′17″W / 45.01944°N 72.90472°W / 45.01944; -72.90472 (Battle of Eccles Hill)
A site commemorating the battle where Canadian volunteers and home guards repulsed the Fenian invaders Battle of Eccles Hill monument
Battle of Lacolle [9] 1814 (battle) 1923 Notre-Dame-du-Mont-Carmel
45°4′9″N 73°20′31″W / 45.06917°N 73.34194°W / 45.06917; -73.34194 (Battle of Lacolle)
A small garrison of British and Canadian defenders repulsed an American attack, ending the last American invasion of Lower Canada during the War of 1812 Blockhouse used by the defenders in the Battle of Lacolle
Battle of September 6th, 1775 [10] 1775 (battle) 1928 Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu
45°16′52″N 73°14′57″W / 45.28111°N 73.24917°W / 45.28111; -73.24917 (Battle of September 6, 1775)
Invading American troops preparing to attack Fort Saint-Jean were ambushed by a party of Mohawks and other allied Aboriginal people, forcing the Americans to retreat to Île aux Noix
Battle of the Cedars [11] 1776 (battle) 1928 Les Cèdres
45°18′35.75″N 74°2′7.21″W / 45.3099306°N 74.0353361°W / 45.3099306; -74.0353361 (Battle of the Cedars)
The American army occupying Montreal established a post here to protect its western flank; a small detachment of the 8th Regiment of Foot, reinforced by allied Aboriginals, laid siege to the outpost and the Americans capitulated Map showing military movements. British movements are in red; American movements are in blue
Battle of the Chateauguay [12] 1813 (battle) 1920 Ormstown
45°9′30″N 73°55′52″W / 45.15833°N 73.93111°W / 45.15833; -73.93111 (Battle of the Chateauguay)
A force consisting of about 1,630 French Canadian regulars and militia and Mohawk warriors under Charles de Salaberry repulsed an American force of about 4,000 attempting to invade Lower Canada during the War of 1812 Bataille de la Chateauguay by Henri Julien. Lithograph from Le Journal de Dimanche, 1884
Battle of the Restigouche [13] 1760 (battle) 1924 Pointe-à-la-Croix
48°1′0″N 66°44′5″W / 48.01667°N 66.73472°W / 48.01667; -66.73472 (Battle of the Restigouche)
A naval battle fought during the Seven Years' War on the Restigouche River between the British and the French; the last naval battle of the war in North American waters, and the French loss hastened the fall of New France Scale model of Machault ship
Battle of Trois-Rivières [14] 1776 (battle) 1920 Trois-Rivières
46°20′38″N 72°33′7″W / 46.34389°N 72.55194°W / 46.34389; -72.55194 (Battle of Trois-Rivières)
British victory over the Continental Army; the last major battle of the American invasion fought on Quebec soil Monument at the Battle of Trois-Rivières
Beauharnois Power Development [15] 1930 (first phase) 1990 Beauharnois
45°18′51″N 73°54′37″W / 45.31417°N 73.91028°W / 45.31417; -73.91028 (Beauharnois Power Development)
A hydroelectric power plant on the Saint Lawrence River that was of significant economic and technological importance at the time of its development 1941 photo of the hydroelectric dam at Beauharnois Power Development
Berthier Railway Station (Canadian Pacific) [16] 1877 (completed) 1976 Sainte-Geneviève-de-Berthier
46°5′18″N 73°12′45″W / 46.08833°N 73.21250°W / 46.08833; -73.21250 (Berthier Railway Station (Canadian Pacific))
One of the small domestic stations originally built along the railway line between Montreal and Quebec City; representative of the expansion of the Canadian Pacific Railway
Blanc-Sablon [17] 7000 BCE (c.) (first inhabited) 2007 Blanc-Sablon
51°25′32″N 57°8′38″W / 51.42556°N 57.14389°W / 51.42556; -57.14389 (Blanc-Sablon)
Over 60 archaeological sites relating to 9000 years of human occupation, including the Archaic, Dorset and European periods Blanc-Sablon and the Davis Strait
Bolton-Est Town Hall [18] 1867 (completed) 1984 East Bolton
45°12′11″N 72°21′23″W / 45.20306°N 72.35639°W / 45.20306; -72.35639 (Bolton-Est Town Hall)
A two-storey clapboard township hall; an enduring tribute to the development of local self-government in Canada
Cap-des-Rosiers Lighthouse [19] 1858 (completed) 1973 Gaspé
48°51′22″N 64°12′5″W / 48.85611°N 64.20139°W / 48.85611; -64.20139 (Cap-des-Rosiers Lighthouse)
A 37-metre (121 ft) high stone lighthouse; the tallest lighthouse in Canada Cap-des-Rosiers Lighthouse and accessory buildings
Carillon Barracks [20] 1838 (completed) 1960 Saint-André-d'Argenteuil
45°33′53.81″N 74°22′18.28″W / 45.5649472°N 74.3717444°W / 45.5649472; -74.3717444 (Carillon Barracks)
A two-storey stone barracks on the main street of the village of Carillon, and now used as the local museum; used to British troops called in to suppress the Lower Canada Rebellion
Carillon Canal [21] 1833 (completed) 1929 Saint-André-d'Argenteuil
45°34′3.87″N 74°22′43.42″W / 45.5677417°N 74.3787278°W / 45.5677417; -74.3787278 (Carillon Canal)
A canal now used for recreational purposes; an important navigable transportation route during the 19th and 20th centuries, joining Montreal to Kingston by the Saint Lawrence River Carillon Canal and nearby trees and power lines
Caughnawaga Mission / Mission of St. Francis Xavier [22] 1647 (established), 1716 (established at Kahnawake) 1966 Kahnawake
45°24′56″N 73°40′36″W / 45.41556°N 73.67667°W / 45.41556; -73.67667 (Caughnawaga Mission / Mission of St. Francis Xavier)
A Jesuit mission to the Mohawks, located within the walls of Fort St-Louis NHSC
Caughnawaga Presbytery [23] 1719 (completed) 1969 Kahnawake
45°24′56″N 73°40′36″W / 45.41556°N 73.67667°W / 45.41556; -73.67667 (Caughnawaga Presbytery)
The oldest surviving building at the Caughnawaga Mission NHSC; the presbytery exemplifies the steep-pitch hip-roofed architecture common to Quebec in the late 17th and early 18th century
Chambly Canal [24] 1843 (completed) 1929 Chambly
45°22′38″N 73°15′27″W / 45.37722°N 73.25750°W / 45.37722; -73.25750 (Chambly Canal)
A 22-kilometre (14 mi) long canal that forms part of a waterway constructed in the 19th century on the Richelieu River, on the inland water transportation route joining Montreal and New York City Chambly Canal in winter
Chapais House [25] 1834 (completed) 1962 Saint-Denis-De La Bouteillerie
47°30′11.88″N 69°56′15.18″W / 47.5033000°N 69.9375500°W / 47.5033000; -69.9375500 (Chapais House)
A two-and-a-half storey clapboard house that was the home of Jean Charles Chapais, a Father of Confederation Chapais House with a church in the background
Church of Notre-Dame-de-la-Présentationl(fr) [26] 1924 (completed) 2004 Shawinigan
46°31′39″N 72°45′1″W / 46.52750°N 72.75028°W / 46.52750; -72.75028 (Church of Notre-Dame-de-la-Présentation)
Large stone Romanesque Revival church, with interior murals by Ozias Leduc; the paintings represent the culmination of Leduc's work and the end of the great era of religious mural painting in Quebec Murals by Ozias Leduc in the interior of the Church of Notre-Dame-de-la-Présentation
Church of Sainte-Marie [27] 1859 (completed) 2006 Sainte-Marie
46°26′15.15″N 71°1′20.47″W / 46.4375417°N 71.0223528°W / 46.4375417; -71.0223528 (Church of Sainte-Marie)
A romantic Gothic Revival style church; known for its unique interiors designed by Charles Baillairgé and its trompe-l'œil and grisaille paintings by artist François-Édouard Meloche Church of Sainte-Marie in winter
Corossol [28] 1693 (shipwreck) 1995 Sept-Îles
50°5′37″N 66°23′29″W / 50.09361°N 66.39139°W / 50.09361; -66.39139 (Corossol)
The underwater remains of a ship belonging to Louis XIV of France which sank in a storm in 1693; the only remains in Canada from the wreck of a 17th-century French vessel
Coteau-du-Lac [29] 1781 (completed) 1923 Coteau-du-Lac
45°17′16″N 74°10′39″W / 45.28778°N 74.17750°W / 45.28778; -74.17750 (Coteau-du-Lac)
The remains of a canal and associated military fortifications; one of the oldest lock canals in North America, and the site of a British military post built following the American Revolutionary War and that served a strategic role during the War of 1812 The block house at the Coteau-du-Lac canal site
Davie Shipyard [30] 1829 (established) 1990 Lévis
46°48′51″N 71°11′5″W / 46.81417°N 71.18472°W / 46.81417; -71.18472 (Davie Shipyard)
A shipyard on the Saint Lawrence River which contains heritage resources dating to the wooden sailing ship era; when it closed in 1998, it was the oldest operational shipyard in Canada The Davie Shipyard seen from a distance over the water
de Salaberry House [31] 1815 (completed) 1968 Chambly
45°26′55″N 73°16′9″W / 45.44861°N 73.26917°W / 45.44861; -73.26917 (de Salaberry House)
The large, three-storey stone house of Charles de Salaberry, located in front of the Chambly Rapids; representative of the style of country homes common in the Montreal region in the early 19th century
Droulers-Tsiionhiakwatha [32] 1400s (established) 2007 Saint-Anicet
45°26′55″N 73°16′9″W / 45.44861°N 73.26917°W / 45.44861; -73.26917 (Droulers-Tsiionhiakwatha)
Discovered in 1994, an archaeological site containing the remains of mid-15th century village of a group now identified as the St. Lawrence Iroquoians; the largest paleohistorical site discovered to date in Quebec Reconstructions of buildings in Droulers-Tsiionhiakwatha
Étienne-Paschal Taché House [33] 1830 (completed) 1990 Montmagny
46°58′52″N 70°33′30″W / 46.98111°N 70.55833°W / 46.98111; -70.55833 (Étienne-Paschal Taché House)
The home of Sir Étienne-Paschal Taché, a Father of Confederation; distinctive house with twin towers
First Geodetic Survey Station [34] 1905 (completed) 1929 Chelsea
45°29′21″N 75°51′45″W / 45.48917°N 75.86250°W / 45.48917; -75.86250 (First Geodetic Survey Station)
Located in Gatineau Park, the site of the first geodetic station established in Canada
Forges du Saint-Maurice [35] 1730 (established) 1919 Trois-Rivières
46°23′50″N 72°39′35″W / 46.39722°N 72.65972°W / 46.39722; -72.65972 (Forges du Saint-Maurice)
An industrial cultural landscape where an ironworks operated for more than 150 years; the principal industrial site under the French Regime, the establishment of which marked the beginnings of Canada's iron industry Ruins of a chimney at the Forges du Saint-Maurice
Former Lamaque Mine and the Bourlamaque Mining Village [36] 1925 (established) 2012 Val-d’Or
48°5′38″N 77°45′54″W / 48.09389°N 77.76500°W / 48.09389; -77.76500 (Former Lamaque Mine and the Bourlamaque Mining Village)
A 22 hectares (54 acres) site comprising a former gold mine and a nearby planned mining town; a well-preserved mining landscape and company town A view of a road and remaining buildings in Bourlamaque
Former Shawinigan Aluminum Smelting Complex(fr) [37] 1899 (established) 2002 Shawinigan
46°32′21″N 72°45′51″W / 46.53917°N 72.76417°W / 46.53917; -72.76417 (Former Shawinigan Aluminum Smelting Complex)
An early aluminum smelter with hydroelectric facilities that supplied it with power; the oldest known, extant aluminum smelting complex in North America Some of the remaining brick buildings at the Former Shawinigan Aluminum Smelting Complex
Fort Chambly [38] 1665 (established) 1920 Chambly
45°26′57″N 73°16′40″W / 45.44917°N 73.27778°W / 45.44917; -73.27778 (Fort Chambly)
A stone fortress on the Richelieu River; served both the French and British regimes during the Iroquoian Wars, the Seven Years' War, the American Revolutionary War, the War of 1812 and the Rebellions of 1837 Entrance to Fort Chambly
Fort Crevier [39] 1687 (established) 1920 Pierreville
46°6′12″N 72°52′43″W / 46.10333°N 72.87861°W / 46.10333; -72.87861 (Fort Crevier)
A fort built to defend the French inhabitants in the region against Iroquois attacks encouraged by the British Fort Crevier Monument
Fort Laprairie [40] 1689 (established) 1921 La Prairie
45°25′15″N 73°29′47″W / 45.42083°N 73.49639°W / 45.42083; -73.49639 (Fort Laprairie)
A site the Saint Lawrence River where a French fort once stood, where it served as a refuge for French settlers and a defensive outpost for Montreal
Fort Lennox [41] 1759 (established) 1920 Saint-Paul-de-l'Île-aux-Noix
45°7′15″N 73°16′5″W / 45.12083°N 73.26806°W / 45.12083; -73.26806 (Fort Lennox)
A fort on Île aux Noix in the Richelieu River, one of the gateways into Canada; used by French, British and American forces during various conflicts Entrance to Fort Lennox
Fort Longueuil [42] 1690 (completed) 1923 Longueuil
45°32′26″N 73°30′30″W / 45.54056°N 73.50833°W / 45.54056; -73.50833 (Fort Longueuil)
The archaeological site of a fort demolished in 1810, extending beneath present-day Saint-Antoine-de-Padoue Cathedral; constructed between 1685 and 1690 as the fortified residence of Charles le Moyne de Longueuil, the only Canadian-born person to be raised to the rank of Baron by the French King A drawing of the ruins of Fort Longueuil in 1825
Fort Richelieu [43] 1642 (established) 1923 Sorel-Tracy
46°2′48″N 73°6′57″W / 46.04667°N 73.11583°W / 46.04667; -73.11583 (Fort Richelieu)
One of the earliest forts in New France, intended to block Iroquois raids using the Richelieu River as a route into Canada 1695 plan of Fort Richelieu
Fort Saint-Jean [44] 1748 (established) 1923 Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu
45°17′53″N 73°15′7″W / 45.29806°N 73.25194°W / 45.29806; -73.25194 (Fort Saint-Jean)
A fort built by Gaspard-Joseph Chaussegros de Léry that withstood a 45-days siege by Richard Montgomery during the American invasion of 1775; now houses the Royal Military College Saint-Jean 1750s plan of Fort Saint-Jean
Fort St-Louis [45] 1725 (established) 1930 Kahnawake
45°24′57″N 73°40′35″W / 45.41583°N 73.67639°W / 45.41583; -73.67639 (Fort St-Louis)
A fort built in 1725 by the French for the protection of a Jesuit mission
Fort Ste. Thérèse [46] 1665 (established) 1923 Chambly
45°23′20.8″N 73°15′27.05″W / 45.389111°N 73.2575139°W / 45.389111; -73.2575139 (Fort Ste. Thérèse)
One of the forts constructed on the Richelieu River by the Carignan Regiment for defence against the Iroquois; site located within the Chambly Canal NHSC area Map of Fort Sainte Thérèse and other forts on the Richelieu River circa 1665 for the campagne of the Regiment of Carignan-Salières
Fort Témiscamingue [47] 1685 (established) 1931 Duhamel-Ouest
47°17′19″N 79°27′41″W / 47.28861°N 79.46139°W / 47.28861; -79.46139 (Fort Témiscamingue)
A fort built by the French to compete with the Hudson's Bay Company; later rebuilt and controlled by the North West Company after the Conquest of 1760 Remnants of Fort Témiscamingue with Lake Timiskaming in the background
Fort Trois-Rivières [48][49] 1634 (established) 1920 Trois-Rivières
46°20′31″N 72°32′19″W / 46.34194°N 72.53861°W / 46.34194; -72.53861 (Fort Trois-Rivières)
The construction of a wooden fort on this site marked the second permanent settlement in New France and the foundation of the modern city of Trois-Rivières Boulder marking the location of Fort Trois-Rivières
Governors' Cottage [50] 1781 (completed) 1957 Sorel-Tracy
46°1′58″N 73°6′59″W / 46.03278°N 73.11639°W / 46.03278; -73.11639 (Governors' Cottage)
A house constructed for Frederick Haldimand as part of a defensive effort to settle the area with Loyalists; used as a summer residence by subsequent Governors and by military commanders until 1860 Front exterior of the Governors' Cottage
Granada Theatre [51] 1929 (completed) 1996 Sherbrooke
45°24′8″N 71°53′28″W / 45.40222°N 71.89111°W / 45.40222; -71.89111 (Granada Theatre)
Theatre with Spanish Revival style facade; excellent example of an atmospheric theatre in Canada Front facade and marquee of the Granada Theatre
Grosse Île and the Irish Memorial [52] 1832 (station established) 1974 Saint-Antoine-de-l'Isle-aux-Grues
47°2′0″N 70°40′0″W / 47.03333°N 70.66667°W / 47.03333; -70.66667 (Grosse Île and the Irish Memorial)
A quarantine station for immigrants arriving at Quebec City from 1832 to 1937; symbolic of the importance of immigration to Canada, and of the tragic experiences of Irish immigrants during the typhus epidemic of 1847 Memorial erected in 1909 in commemoration of the death of Irish immigrants of 1849. Grosse-Île, Québec, Canada.
Haskell Free Library and Opera House [53] 1904 (completed) 1985 Stanstead
45°0′20.34″N 72°5′51.84″W / 45.0056500°N 72.0977333°W / 45.0056500; -72.0977333 (Haskell Free Library and Opera House)
A two-storey, Queen Anne Revival style building with tower that houses both a library and an opera house; the building straddles the Canadian-American border and was donated to the residents of both countries Turrett on the Haskell Free Library and Opera House
Havelock Township Hall [54] 1868 (completed) 1984 Havelock
45°2′45″N 73°45′28″W / 45.04583°N 73.75778°W / 45.04583; -73.75778 (Havelock Township Hall)
A stone township hall; an exceptional example of the rural town halls built in l9th century Canada
Île aux Basques [55] 1580 (ca.) (outpost established) 1984 Trois-Pistoles
48°8′34″N 69°14′58″W / 48.14278°N 69.24944°W / 48.14278; -69.24944 (Île aux Basques)
A small island that served as an outpost from about 1580 to 1630 for Basque fishermen who crossed the ocean from France; the only recorded site in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence where archaeological resources confirm early commercial contact between Europeans and Aboriginals Photograph of a furnace used to melt whale blubber left by the Basques on Île aux Basques
Île d'Orléans Seigneury [56] 1636 (seigneury established) 1990 L'Île-d'Orléans Regional County Municipality
46°55′0″N 70°58′0″W / 46.91667°N 70.96667°W / 46.91667; -70.96667 (Île d'Orléans Seigneury)
One of the earliest settled areas of New France; the landscape and surviving 17th and 18th-century buildings are evocative of the seigneurial system of New France Landscape on Île d'Orléans
Île-Verte Lighthouse [57] 1809 (completed) 1974 Notre-Dame-des-Sept-Douleurs
48°3′4″N 69°25′27″W / 48.05111°N 69.42417°W / 48.05111; -69.42417 (Île-Verte Lighthouse)
A 12-metre (39 ft) high cylindrical stone lighthouse; the first lighthouse on the Saint Lawrence River, and third oldest lighthouse in Canada Île-Verte Lighthouse silhouetted against the sky
Jardins de Métis(fr) [58] 1926 (established) 1995 Grand-Métis
48°37′42″N 68°7′23″W / 48.62833°N 68.12306°W / 48.62833; -68.12306 (Jardins de Métis)
An English-inspired garden created by Elsie Reford during the years 1926 to 1958; an excellent Canadian example of this type of garden The villa at the Jardins de Métis
Joffre Roundhouse (Canadian National) [59] 1880 (completed) 1992 Charny
46°42′25″N 71°16′20″W / 46.70694°N 71.27222°W / 46.70694; -71.27222 (Joffre Roundhouse (Canadian National))
Only existing full-circle roundhouse in Canada
Joliette Court House [60] 1862 (completed) 1981 Joliette
46°1′34″N 73°26′33″W / 46.02611°N 73.44250°W / 46.02611; -73.44250 (Joliette Court House)
A noted and well-preserved example of a Neoclassical public building
Joly de Lotbinière Estate(fr) [61] 1851 (established) 2003 Sainte-Croix
46°40′2″N 71°50′55″W / 46.66722°N 71.84861°W / 46.66722; -71.84861 (Joly de Lotbinière Estate)
A remarkable 136-hectare (340-acre) manorial summer estate on the Pointe Platon peninsula, founded by Henri-Gustave Joly de Lotbinière The manor house at Joly de Lotbinière Estate
L'Isle-Verte Court House [62] 1860 (completed) 1981 L'Isle-Verte
48°0′45″N 69°20′20″W / 48.01250°N 69.33889°W / 48.01250; -69.33889 (L'Isle-Verte Court House)
A court house built in the Regency style, a style rarely used for public buildings in Canada; a rare example of a purpose-built circuit court building
La Corne Nursing Station [63] 1930 (established) 2003 La Corne
48°21′23″N 77°59′46″W / 48.35639°N 77.99611°W / 48.35639; -77.99611 (La Corne Nursing Station)
Two wooden buildings that are one of the best preserved of the 174 nursing stations created in Quebec between 1932 and 1975; symbolizes the contribution of nurses in isolated, rural communities
La Malbaie Historic District [64] 1930 (established) 2007 La Malbaie
47°37′23″N 70°8′30″W / 47.62306°N 70.14167°W / 47.62306; -70.14167 (La Malbaie Historic District)
One of the oldest villégiature, or vacation, areas in Canada, with impressive vistas overlooking the Saint Lawrence River Manoir Richelieu in La Malbaie
Le Boutillier Manor [65] 1860 (completed) 1975 Gaspé
48°55′56″N 64°18′6″W / 48.93222°N 64.30167°W / 48.93222; -64.30167 (Le Boutillier Manor)
The distinctive home of businessman and political figure John Le Boutillier
Légaré Mill(fr) [66] 1763 (completed) 1999 Saint-Eustache
45°33′29″N 73°53′45″W / 45.55806°N 73.89583°W / 45.55806; -73.89583 (Légaré Mill)
A flour mill that has functioned continuously since the French colonial period; a proto-industrial building site that is representative of the development of the seigneurial system and the related colonial agricultural economy Detail of the Légaré Mill
Lévis Forts [67] 1872 (completed) 1920 Lévis
46°48′53″N 71°9′31″W / 46.81472°N 71.15861°W / 46.81472; -71.15861 (Lévis Forts)
The remains of three 19th-century stone defensive works located on a height of land on the south bank of the Saint Lawrence River; constructed by the British, they were an integral part of the fortifications of Quebec City An entrance into the Lévis Forts
Lévis Railway Station (Intercolonial) [68] 1884 (completed) 1976 Lévis
46°48′37″N 71°11′14″W / 46.81028°N 71.18722°W / 46.81028; -71.18722 (Lévis Railway Station (Intercolonial))
A two-storey, stone railway station building that served as the terminus of the Intercolonial Railway from Halifax
Louis Bertrand House [69] 1853 (completed) 1999 L'Isle-Verte
48°0′49″N 69°20′16″W / 48.01361°N 69.33778°W / 48.01361; -69.33778 (Louis Bertrand House)
A house built in the traditional "maison québecoise" manner for merchant and politician Louis Bertrand; an outstanding example of its style and type, and representative of the lifestyle middle-class families in Quebec society in the 19th century Louis Bertrand House surrounded by trees
Louis S. St. Laurent [70] 1881 (lots assembled by St. Laurent family) 1973 Compton
45°14′29″N 71°49′30″W / 45.24139°N 71.82500°W / 45.24139; -71.82500 (Louis S. St. Laurent)
The site where Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent was born; a cultural landscape associated with the life of Canada's 12th Prime Minister and that also commemorates the social history of the Eastern Townships
Magog Textile Mill(fr) [71] 1883 (completed) 1989 Magog
45°15′45″N 72°8′28″W / 45.26250°N 72.14111°W / 45.26250; -72.14111 (Magog Textile Mill)
The only 19th-century cotton mill in Canada where the entire process of spinning, weaving, bleaching and printing was carried on at one site, and the mill where cotton was printed in 1884 for the first time in Canada The Magog Textile Mill
Manoir Papineau [72] 1850 (completed) 1986 Montebello
45°38′45.96″N 74°56′44.85″W / 45.6461000°N 74.9457917°W / 45.6461000; -74.9457917 (Manoir Papineau)
A large mansion on a bluff overlooking the Ottawa River, located on the grounds of the Château Montebello hotel; commemorates the first owner of the house, Louis-Joseph Papineau Facade of Manoir Papineau
Mauvide-Genest Manor [73] 1734 (completed) 1993 Saint-Jean-de-l'Île-d'Orléans
46°54′51″N 70°54′9″W / 46.91417°N 70.90250°W / 46.91417; -70.90250 (Mauvide-Genest Manor)
An excellent example of a mid 18th-century, rural seigneurial manor Mauvide-Genest Manor in 1930
Old Chicoutimi Pulp Mill(fr) [74] 1896 (established) 1983 Chicoutimi
48°25′14″N 71°5′0″W / 48.42056°N 71.08333°W / 48.42056; -71.08333 (Old Chicoutimi Pulp Mill)
An industrial complex in a wooded area, comprising five stone buildings constructed between 1898 and 1923; the major facility of the Chicoutimi Pulp Company, Canada's largest producer of mechanical wood pulp in the early 20th century Old Chicoutimi Pulp Mill and river
Old Chicoutimi Trading Post [75] 1676 (established) 1972 Chicoutimi
48°25′44″N 71°4′32″W / 48.42889°N 71.07556°W / 48.42889; -71.07556 (Old Chicoutimi Trading Post)
A fur trade post, built at the head of the Saguenay River, which became the principal trading post in the region and the major centre of the fur trade in the interior
Pagé - Rinfret House / Beaudry House [76] 1720 (established) 1969 Cap-Santé
46°40′19″N 71°47′0″W / 46.67194°N 71.78333°W / 46.67194; -71.78333 (Pagé - Rinfret House / Beaudry House)
A one-and-a-half-storey, wood-frame house overlooking the Saint Lawrence River, reflective of the architecture of New France and French Canadian building traditions
Pointe-au-Père Lighthouse [77] 1859 (first lighthouse completed) 1974 Rimouski
48°31′2.79″N 68°28′8.39″W / 48.5174417°N 68.4689972°W / 48.5174417; -68.4689972 (Pointe-au-Père Lighthouse)
A lighthouse and associated buildings located on a headland facing the Saint Lawrence River; an important navigation light in the river and the Gulf of Saint Lawrence Pointe-au-Père Lighthouse, accessory building and streetlight
Pointe-du-Buisson [78] 3000 BCE (ca.) (earliest archaeological resources) 2005 Beauharnois
45°18′59.28″N 73°57′57.18″W / 45.3164667°N 73.9658833°W / 45.3164667; -73.9658833 (Pointe-du-Buisson)
A 21-hectare (52-acre) archaeological site on a point of land along the Saint Lawrence River; documents the history of Aboriginal populations over the last 5000 years who used the river in their travels
Powerscourt Covered Bridge [79] 1861 (completed) 1984 Elgin and Hinchinbrooke
45°0′25.13″N 74°9′39.75″W / 45.0069806°N 74.1610417°W / 45.0069806; -74.1610417 (Powerscourt Covered Bridge)
A wooden covered bridge that still stands on its original stone foundations; the only remaining McCallum inflexible arched truss bridge in the world and one of the oldest extant covered bridges in Canada View of the Powerscourt Covered Bridge and the Chateauguay River
Rivière-du-Loup Town Hall [80] 1916 (completed) 1984 Rivière-du-Loup
47°50′9″N 69°32′12″W / 47.83583°N 69.53667°W / 47.83583; -69.53667 (Rivière-du-Loup Town Hall)
A two-storey red-brick city hall, the eclectic design of which set it apart from the surrounding commercial buildings at the time of its construction; symbolizes the town's aspirations and desire to increase its profile during the First World War Rivière-du-Loup Town Hall
Roberval Town Hall(fr) [81] 1929 (completed) 1984 Roberval
48°31′6″N 72°13′20″W / 48.51833°N 72.22222°W / 48.51833; -72.22222 (Roberval Town Hall)
A three-storey town hall with steeply pitched, Second Empire-style metal roofs; symbolizes the prosperity of Roberval and its increasing importance within the Saguenay–Lac-Saint-Jean region at the time of the building's construction Roberval Town Hall in summer
Round Stone Windmill and House(fr) [82] 1721 (windmill completed) 1969 Notre-Dame-de-l'Île-Perrot
45°21′57″N 73°51′8″W / 45.36583°N 73.85222°W / 45.36583; -73.85222 (Round Stone Windmill and House)
An extremely rare stone windmill and accessory miller’s house dating from the 18th-century seigneury, located on Île Perrot The windmill with Lake Saint-Louis in the background
Saint-André-de-Kamouraska Church(fr) [83] 1811 (completed) 1985 Saint-André
47°40′25″N 69°43′44″W / 47.67361°N 69.72889°W / 47.67361; -69.72889 (Saint-André-de-Kamouraska Church)
A noted example of the small Quebec churches built according to the "Récollet Plan” (a broad nave with a narrower semicircular apse); the interiors contain some of the best surviving examples of the work of sculptor Louis-Xavier Leprohon Saint-André-de-Kamouraska Church in winter
Saint-Hyacinthe Post Office [84] 1894 (completed) 1983 Saint-Hyacinthe
45°37′25″N 72°56′55″W / 45.62361°N 72.94861°W / 45.62361; -72.94861 (Saint-Hyacinthe Post Office)
A noted example of the work of federal architect Thomas Fuller Saint-Hyacinthe Post Office
Saint-Jean-d'Iberville Railway Station (Grand Trunk) [85] 1890 (completed) 1976 Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu
45°18′11″N 73°15′15″W / 45.30306°N 73.25417°W / 45.30306; -73.25417 (Saint-Jean-d'Iberville Railway Station (Grand Trunk))
A one-storey passenger railway station; representative of the expansion of the Grand Trunk Railway and of the company's presence in Quebec prior to its 1923 amalgamation with Canadian National Railways In celebration of the 100th anniversary of the first train in Canada, a replica of an old steam engine used by The Champlain & St. Lawrence Railway was brought into the Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu railway station in 1936
Saint-Joachim Church [86] 1797 (completed) 1999 Châteauguay
45°21′39″N 73°44′55″W / 45.36083°N 73.74861°W / 45.36083; -73.74861 (Saint-Joachim Church)
A noted example of the vernacular Baroque style in the St. Lawrence Valley, with interior decor by Philippe Liébert and Joseph Légaré Side view of Saint-Joachim Church
Saint-Joseph-de-Beauce Institutional Ensemble [87] 1865-1911 (period of construction) 2006 Saint-Joseph-de-Beauce
46°18′36″N 70°52′58″W / 46.31000°N 70.88278°W / 46.31000; -70.88278 (Saint-Joseph-de-Beauce Institutional Ensemble)
A complex of five main buildings consisting of a church, convent, presbytery, orphanage and school; one of the most striking institutional ensembles in Quebec, and illustrative of the Catholic institutions in small towns that served as gathering places for religious, educational and community services
Saint-Joseph-de-la-Rive Shipyard [88] 1946 (established) 1996 Les Éboulements
47°27′21″N 70°21′45″W / 47.45583°N 70.36250°W / 47.45583; -70.36250 (Saint-Joseph-de-la-Rive Shipyard)
A shipyard associated with small-scale coastal shipping along the Saint Lawrence River, and the largest builder of wooden schooners known as "goélettes"
Saint-Ours Canal [89] 1849 (completed), 1933 (current locks completed) 1996 Saint-Ours
45°51′53″N 73°8′48″W / 45.86472°N 73.14667°W / 45.86472; -73.14667 (Saint-Ours Canal)
A canal on the east bank of the Richelieu River; along with the Chambly Canal, commemorates the importance in the 19th century of the inland water transportation route joining Montreal and New York City
Saint-Vincent-de-Paul Penitentiary [90] 1873 (established) 1990 Laval
45°37′1″N 73°38′47″W / 45.61694°N 73.64639°W / 45.61694; -73.64639 (Saint-Vincent-de-Paul Penitentiary)
Canada’s second federal penitentiary, and for a time the country’s sole francophone correctional facility; the now-closed facility is representative of over a century of criminal justice Saint-Vincent-de-Paul Penitentiary in 1884
Sainte-Anne Processional Chapel [91] 1830 (completed) 1990 Neuville
46°41′56″N 71°34′57″W / 46.69889°N 71.58250°W / 46.69889; -71.58250 (Sainte-Anne Processional Chapel)
A small early rubblestone chapel with a gable roof and belltower; the chapel and surrounding site have remained remarkably intact from the time of the chapel's construction in the early 19th century Sainte-Anne Processional Chapel
The Sainte-Croix-de-Tadoussac Mission Church(fr) [92] 1750 (completed) 2012 Tadoussac
48°8′30.09″N 69°42′55.12″W / 48.1416917°N 69.7153111°W / 48.1416917; -69.7153111 (The Sainte-Croix-de-Tadoussac Mission Church)
A mission church from the era of New France and the oldest extant wooden church in Canada; bore witness to Jesuit missionary work in remote areas of New France and the conversion of the Innu to Christianity The spire of The Sainte-Croix-de-Tadoussac Mission Church
Second Battle of Laprairie [93] 1691 (battle) 1921 La Prairie
45°23′21″N 73°24′13″W / 45.38917°N 73.40361°W / 45.38917; -73.40361 (Second Battle of Laprairie)
After Pieter Schuyler led a British force in a surprise attack on the French frontier settlement of La Prairie, Captain de Valrennes and a small band of French and Indian troops intercepted the British and inflicted a severe defeat, forcing the British to withdraw to New York
Sir Wilfrid Laurier [94] 1870 (completed) 1938 Saint-Lin-Laurentides
45°51′12″N 73°45′27″W / 45.85333°N 73.75750°W / 45.85333; -73.75750 (Sir Wilfrid Laurier)
A small house on the site where Wilfrid Laurier was born in 1841, which was acquired by the federal government in 1937 under the mistaken impression it was actually the Laurier family house (the house was built 5 years after the Lauriers sold the lot); one of two houses in Quebec that are designated NHSCs in commemoration of Canada's 7th Prime Minister A bedroom interior at the Sir Wilfrid Laurier National Historic Site
St. Stephen's Anglican Church [95] 1822 (completed) 1970 Chambly
45°26′52″N 73°16′26″W / 45.44778°N 73.27389°W / 45.44778; -73.27389 (St. Stephen's Anglican Church)
A small, stone church, originally constructed for the garrison at Fort Chambly; combines Quebec architectural traditions with Palladian influences, and is a noted example of early 19th century ecclesiastical architecture in Canada Front facade of St. Stephen's Anglican Church
Symmes Hotel [96] 1831 (completed) 1976 Gatineau
45°23′40″N 75°51′18″W / 45.39444°N 75.85500°W / 45.39444; -75.85500 (Symmes Hotel)
A stone inn overlooking the north shore of the Ottawa River, originally built for Charles Symmes, the founder of Aylmer; notable as a stopping place on a busy early transportation route which led to the trading posts of northwestern Quebec Symmes Hotel and signage
Trestler House(fr) [97] 1806 (completed) 1969 Vaudreuil-Dorion
45°23′17″N 74°0′25″W / 45.38806°N 74.00694°W / 45.38806; -74.00694 (Trestler House)
A gable-roofed rubblestone house built for Jean-Joseph Trestler; a noted example of traditional Quebec architecture Front of Trestler House
Trois-Rivières Historical Complex [98] 1700 - 1829 (construction period) 1962 Trois-Rivières
46°20′38″N 72°32′12″W / 46.34389°N 72.53667°W / 46.34389; -72.53667 (Trois-Rivières Historical Complex)
A historic area comprising five buildings: De Gannes House, the Hertel de la Fresnière House, the Recollet Convent, the Recollet Church, and the Ursuline Convent; a unique group of buildings that represents 18th-century French Canada View of buildings in the Trois-Rivières Historical Complex, including the Ursulines dome
Waapushukamikw [99] 5050 BCE (ca.) (establishment) 2009 Baie-James
51°4′8″N 72°54′14″W / 51.06889°N 72.90389°W / 51.06889; -72.90389 (Waapushukamikw)
A white quartzite hill approximately 40 metres (130 ft) high that served as a major quarry site for Aboriginal peoples, and remains a place of spiritual significance for the Mistissini Cree
Wilfrid Laurier House(fr) [100] 1877 (completed) 1999 Victoriaville
46°2′14″N 71°54′54″W / 46.03722°N 71.91500°W / 46.03722; -71.91500 (Wilfrid Laurier House)
A red-brick, Italianate-style house that served as Wilfrid Laurier's principal residence for 20 years, and his summer home until his death in 1919; now a museum commemorating Canada's 7th Prime Minister Wilfrid Laurier House with a bust of Laurier in front
Wreck of RMS Empress of Ireland [101] 1914 (sinking) 2009 The riverbed of the Saint Lawrence River near Rimouski
48°37′30″N 68°24′29.99″W / 48.62500°N 68.4083306°W / 48.62500; -68.4083306 (Wreck of RMS Empress of Ireland)
The wreck of the worst maritime disaster in Canadian history; the sole surviving ship from the Canadian Pacific Railway's heyday prior to the First World War as the world's largest and most extensive transportation and communications network The RMS Empress of Ireland in 1908
Wreck of the Elizabeth and Mary [102] 1690 (sinking) 1996 The seabed of Anse aux Bouleaux, near Baie-Trinité
49°22′55″N 67°18′55″W / 49.38194°N 67.31528°W / 49.38194; -67.31528 (Wreck of the Elizabeth and Mary)
The remains of one of four vessels from the fleet of Admiral William Phips, lost during an ill-fated expedition from New England to attack New France

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Directory of Federal Heritage Designations - Quebec, Parks Canada
  2. ^ Quebec, National Historic Sites of Canada - administered by Parks Canada
  3. ^ Acton Vale Railway Station (Grand Trunk). Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  4. ^ Alert Hangar. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  5. ^ Apitipik. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 20 March 2012.
  6. ^ Arvida Historic District. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 28 March 2013.
  7. ^ Banc de Pêche de Paspébiac. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 4 March 2012.
  8. ^ Battle of Eccles Hill. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 4 March 2012.
  9. ^ Battle of Lacolle. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 20 March 2012.
  10. ^ Battle of September 6th, 1775. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 20 March 2012.
  11. ^ Battle of the Cedars. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 20 March 2012.
  12. ^ Battle of the Chateauguay. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 4 March 2012.
  13. ^ Battle of the Restigouche. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 24 March 2012.
  14. ^ Battle of Trois-Rivières. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 24 March 2012.
  15. ^ Beauharnois Power Development. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 24 March 2012.
  16. ^ Berthier Railway Station (Canadian Pacific). Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 5 March 2012.
  17. ^ Blanc-Sablon. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 5 March 2012.
  18. ^ Bolton-Est Town Hall. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 5 March 2012.
  19. ^ Cap-des-Rosiers Lighthouse. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 5 March 2012.
  20. ^ Carillon Barracks. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 18 March 2012.
  21. ^ Carillon Canal. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 18 March 2012.
  22. ^ Caughnawaga Mission / Mission of St. Francis Xavier. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 18 March 2012.
  23. ^ Caughnawaga Presbytery. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 18 March 2012.
  24. ^ Chambly Canal. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 18 March 2012.
  25. ^ Chapais House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 18 March 2012.
  26. ^ Church of Notre-Dame-de-la-Présentation. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 19 March 2012.
  27. ^ Church of Sainte-Marie. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 20 March 2012.
  28. ^ Corossol. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 22 April 2012.
  29. ^ Coteau-du-Lac. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 20 March 2012.
  30. ^ Davie Shipyard. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 24 March 2012.
  31. ^ de Salaberry House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 24 March 2012.
  32. ^ Droulers-Tsiionhiakwatha. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 24 March 2012.
  33. ^ Étienne-Paschal Taché House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 24 March 2012.
  34. ^ First Geodetic Survey Station. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 25 March 2012.
  35. ^ Forges du Saint-Maurice. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 25 March 2012.
  36. ^ Former Lamaque Mine and the Bourlamaque Mining Village. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 24 October 2013.
  37. ^ Former Shawinigan Aluminum Smelting Complex. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 25 March 2012.
  38. ^ Fort Chambly. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 25 March 2012.
  39. ^ Fort Crevier. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 25 March 2012.
  40. ^ Fort Laprairie. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 25 March 2012.
  41. ^ Fort Lennox. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 25 March 2012.
  42. ^ Fort Longueuil. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 7 April 2012.
  43. ^ Fort Richelieu. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 27 March 2012.
  44. ^ Fort Saint-Jean. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 27 March 2012.
  45. ^ Fort St-Louis. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 27 March 2012.
  46. ^ Fort Ste. Thérèse. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 28 March 2012.
  47. ^ Fort Témiscamingue. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 28 March 2012.
  48. ^ Fort Trois-Rivières. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 28 March 2012.
  49. ^ Roy-Sole, Monique. "A Tale of Tenacity", Canadian Geographic Magazine, April 2009, Vol. 129, No. 2, p. 31.
  50. ^ Governors' Cottage. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 28 March 2012.
  51. ^ Granada Theatre. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 31 March 2012.
  52. ^ Grosse Île and the Irish Memorial. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 31 March 2012.
  53. ^ Haskell Free Library and Opera House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 31 March 2012.
  54. ^ Havelock Township Hall. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 31 March 2012.
  55. ^ Île aux Basques. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 31 March 2012.
  56. ^ Île d'Orléans Seigneury. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 31 March 2012.
  57. ^ Île-Verte Lighthouse. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 1 April 2012.
  58. ^ Jardins de Métis. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 1 April 2012.
  59. ^ Joffre Roundhouse (Canadian National). Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 1 April 2012.
  60. ^ Joliette Court House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 1 April 2012.
  61. ^ Joly de Lotbinière Estate. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 1 April 2012.
  62. ^ L'Isle-Verte Court House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 2 April 2012.
  63. ^ La Corne Nursing Station. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 2 April 2012.
  64. ^ La Malbaie Historic District. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 2 April 2012.
  65. ^ Le Boutillier Manor. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 6 April 2012.
  66. ^ Légaré Mill. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 6 April 2012.
  67. ^ Lévis Forts. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 6 April 2012.
  68. ^ Lévis Railway Station (Intercolonial). Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 6 April 2012.
  69. ^ Louis Bertrand House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 7 April 2012.
  70. ^ Louis S. St. Laurent. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 7 April 2012.
  71. ^ Magog Textile Mill. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 7 April 2012.
  72. ^ Manoir Papineau. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 7 April 2012.
  73. ^ Mauvide-Genest Manor. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 7 April 2012.
  74. ^ Old Chicoutimi Pulp Mill. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 7 April 2012.
  75. ^ Old Chicoutimi Trading Post. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 7 April 2012.
  76. ^ Pagé - Rinfret House / Beaudry House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 8 April 2012.
  77. ^ Pointe-au-Père Lighthouse. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 8 April 2012.
  78. ^ Pointe-du-Buisson. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 8 April 2012.
  79. ^ Powerscourt Covered Bridge. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 9 April 2012.
  80. ^ Rivière-du-Loup Town Hall. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 9 April 2012.
  81. ^ Roberval Town Hall. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 9 April 2012.
  82. ^ Round Stone Windmill and House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 9 April 2012.
  83. ^ Saint-André-de-Kamouraska Church. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 9 April 2012.
  84. ^ Saint-Hyacinthe Post Office. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 10 April 2012.
  85. ^ Saint-Jean-d'Iberville Railway Station (Grand Trunk). Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 10 April 2012.
  86. ^ Saint-Joachim Church. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 19 April 2012.
  87. ^ Saint-Joseph-de-Beauce Institutional Ensemble. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 19 April 2012.
  88. ^ Saint-Joseph-de-la-Rive Shipyard. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 19 April 2012.
  89. ^ Saint-Ours Canal. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 19 April 2012.
  90. ^ Saint-Vincent-de-Paul Penitentiary. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 21 April 2012.
  91. ^ Sainte-Anne Processional Chapel. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 21 April 2012.
  92. ^ The Sainte-Croix-de-Tadoussac Mission Church. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 28 March 2013.
  93. ^ Second Battle of Laprairie. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 22 April 2012.
  94. ^ Sir Wilfrid Laurier. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 22 April 2012.
  95. ^ St. Stephen's Anglican Church. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 25 April 2012.
  96. ^ Symmes Hotel. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 25 April 2012.
  97. ^ Trestler House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 25 April 2012.
  98. ^ Trois-Rivières Historical Complex. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 25 April 2012.
  99. ^ Waapushukamikw. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 25 April 2012.
  100. ^ Wilfrid Laurier House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 29 April 2012.
  101. ^ Wreck of RMS Empress of Ireland. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 29 April 2012.
  102. ^ Wreck of the Elizabeth and Mary. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 29 April 2012.