List of University of Florida Athletic Hall of Fame members

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University of Florida
Athletic Hall of Fame
Awarded for Excellence in college sports
Date March 7, 2014 (2014-03-07) (last induction)
Location Gainesville, Florida
Country United States
Presented by University of Florida Lettermen's Association (F Club)
Reward Honorary
Official website http://www.gatorfclub.org/hall-of-fame

This List of University of Florida Athletic Hall of Fame members includes over 300 former Florida Gators athletes who represented the University of Florida in one or more intercollegiate sports and were recognized as "Gator Greats" for their athletic excellence during their college sports careers. The University of Florida, located in Gainesville, Florida, is a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC), and fields twenty-one intercollegiate sports teams, all of which compete in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).

Gator Greats are listed below in alphabetical order within each sport. Those listed include athletes from nine men's sports and nine women's sports. This list also includes "Distinguished Letterwinners," who are former Gators athletes who achieved distinction after graduation, as athletic coaches or administrators, professional athletes, or in public service or other career activities; and "Honorary Letterwinners," who were not former Gators athletes, but who distinguished themselves by their significant contributions to the success of the Florida Gators sports teams, including former championship Gators coaches. Distinguished Letterwinners and Honorary Letterwinners are listed below in alphabetical order in separate sections near the end of this article.

The Hall of Fame's Class of 2013 included Gator Greats Jeff Davis (wrestling), Josh Fogg (baseball), Rex Grossman (football), Riko Higashio (women's golf), Heather Mitts (women's soccer), Mike Pearson (football), and Chrissy Van Fleet (women's gymnastics); Honorary Letterwinner Ernestine Weaver (women's gymnastics coach); and Distinguished Letterwinner Larry Morris (football).[1] The Class of 2014 included Gator Greats Aury Cruz (volleyball), Jenny Gladding (softball), Justin O'Neal (men's tennis), Keiwan Ratliff (football), Colleen Rosensteel (women's track and field), Mike Stanley (baseball) and Sarah Yohe (women's soccer), and Distinguished Letterwinner Harry Wilder (men's swimming). The Class of 2014 was inducted on March 7, 2014.[2]

Baseball[edit]

The following Gator Greats are former members of the Florida Gators baseball team:

Name Sport Years Accomplishments
Robert F. Barnes Baseball 1953, 1956, 1958 In a college career interrupted by military service, Bobby Barnes lettered in 1953, 1956 and 1958.[3] He was a first-team All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) selection twice—first as catcher, then as outfielder, and led the Gators with twenty runs scored in 1958.[3]
Cecil Beck Football
Track & field
Baseball
1925–27
1926–27
1926–28
Three-sport letterman Cecil Beck was a 100- and 200-yard sprinter nicknamed "Jack Rabbit." In football, the halfback memorably lifted his team over Washington & Lee with a 55-yard touchdown run; in baseball, the center fielder's swift base-running and heavy bat won him a contract with the Boston Braves. Beck was also a Phi Beta Kappa and two-time recipient of the Norris Trophy as the university's outstanding scholar-athlete.[4]
Harry L. Coe, III Baseball 1951–52 Pitcher Harry Coe was an All-SEC selection in 1952.[3] After his college career, he played four seasons of minor league baseball and put himself through law school. Coe later served as a circuit court judge and state attorney in Hillsborough County, Florida.
Douglas M. Corbett Baseball 1971–74 Pitcher Doug Corbett was an All-SEC selection in 1974.[3] He made his Major League Baseball (MLB) debut with the Minnesota Twins in 1980, and played eight MLB seasons with the Twins, the California Angels and the Baltimore Orioles. Corbett was an American League All-Star in 1981.[5]
David M. Eckstein Baseball 1994–97 Infielder David Eckstein was a walk-on player who garnered All-SEC and All-American honors, and was a member of the Gators' 1996 College World Series team. In 1997, he compiled eighty-five runs, 125 runs batted in, and thirty-five stolen bases.[3] He made his MLB debut with the Anaheim Angels in 2001, and in ten MLB seasons, he earned two World Series rings, and 2006 World Series MVP honors.[6]
Joshua S. Fogg Baseball 1995–98 Pitcher Josh Fogg received All-SEC and consensus first-team All-American honors, and was a member of the Gators' 1996 College World Series team.[3] He made his MLB debut with the Chicago White Sox in 2001, and subsequently played for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Colorado Rockies and Cincinnati Reds.[7]
Perry C. McGriff, Jr. Baseball
Football
1958–60
1958–59
Outfielder Perry McGriff was a two-time All-SEC selection and the Gators' first-ever two-time All-American in baseball.[3] He also received All-SEC and All-American honors in football. McGriff was later elected to the Florida House of Representatives.
Tom Moore Baseball 1960, 1962–63 Third baseman Tom Moore was a two-time All-SEC selection and a two-time first-team All-American. In 1962 and 1963, Moore led the Gators in batting average, hits and stolen bases. He still holds the team records for stolen bases in a single game and triples in a season.[3]
Louis Pesce Baseball 1952–54 First baseman Lou Pesce was an All-SEC selection in 1954.[3]
Robert G. Pitman Baseball
Basketball
1931–33
1931–33
Bob Pittman was the third baseman for the Gators in the early 1930s and received honorable mention All-American honors after leading the team with a .350 batting average. He later served as the backfield coach for the Gators football team from 1942 to 1945, and the head baseball coach in 1945.
Quintus I. Roberts Baseball 1931–33 Q. I. Roberts was a standout Florida Gators baseball player from 1931 to 1933. Roberts became an educator and coach in the public schools of Putnam County, Florida.
R. Rudy Simpson, Jr. Baseball 1951–54 Pitcher Rudy Simpson was the Gators' first scholarship baseball player in 1951. Simpson was an All-SEC selection in 1954.[3]
R. Michael Stanley Baseball 1982–85 Catcher Mike Stanley was a member of the SEC All-Tournament Team in 1982, 1984 and 1985, and was a key member of the Gators' SEC regular season and tournament championship teams in 1982 and 1984. Often serving as the team's designated hitter, Stanley still holds the team records for runs scored and runs batted in.[3] He played fifteen MLB seasons for the Texas Rangers, New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox, Toronto Blue Jays and Oakland Athletics.[8]
Haywood C. Sullivan Baseball
Football
1951–52
1950–51
Haywood Sullivan was a two-sport standout in baseball and football, and is generally rated as the best passing quarterback of the first fifty-five years of the Gators football program. His equally strong baseball talent led to him receiving a Major League Baseball bonus contract from the Boston Red Sox in 1952, and he rose from team catcher, to general manager, and ultimately, to general partner of the Red Sox franchise.
E. Burton Touchberry Baseball
Basketball
1954–57
1954–57
Burt Touchberry was a two-sport star in baseball and basketball. In baseball, he was a three-year starting pitcher and an All-SEC selection. As a senior in 1957, he pitched ten games, with twenty-eight strikeouts and an earned run average of 0.81—still the best single season ERA in Gators history.[3]
S. Bradley Wilkerson Baseball 1996–98 Brad Wilkerson was an outfielder, a first baseman, and a three-time first-team All-American. In three years as a Gator, he compiled fifty-five home runs, 224 runs batted in, and forty-six stolen bases.[3] After college, he won a gold medal as a member of the winning U.S. national team at the 2000 Olympics.[9] He made his MLB debut with the Montreal Expos in 2001, and played eight MLB seasons.[10]
Dale J. Willis Baseball 1954–56 Pitcher Dale Willis was an All-SEC selection in 1956. As a senior, Willis posted three consecutive games with ten or more strikeouts, and averaged 11.9 strikeouts per game.[3] Willis made his MLB debut with the Kansas City Athletics in 1963.[11]

Men's basketball[edit]

The following Gator Greats are former members of the Florida Gators men's basketball team:

Name Sport Years Accomplishments
Richard J. Casares Basketball
Football
1951–53
1951–53
Guard Rick Casares was a two-sport standout in basketball and football.[12] In basketball, he was the Gators' leading scorer for two straight seasons, a two-time All-SEC selection, and a team captain. In 1951, he hit 13-of-13 field goal attempts against Georgia Tech. Casares was drafted by the Chicago Bears and played professional football for twelve seasons.[13]
W. N. "Ben" Clemons Football
Basketball
Baseball
1928–30
1929–31
1930–32
Ben Clemons was a three-sport standout athlete who played for the Florida Gators football, basketball and baseball teams for three years as a collegian. After his undergraduate career, Clemons returned as the basketball team's head coach from 1933 to 1936, the baseball team's head coach from 1934 to 1936, and an assistant football coach from 1933 to 1935.[12]
Daniel C. Cross, Jr. Basketball 1992–95 Guard Dan Cross was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, received All-American honors twice, and was a senior team captain. Memorably, Cross made a layup at the buzzer to defeat James Madison and advance in the 1994 NCAA Tournament, and was a major factor in the Gators' run to their first-ever NCAA Final Four in 1994. He led the team in scoring during the 1993–94 and 1994–95 seasons.
A. Curtis Cunkle, Jr. Basketball 1951–53 Forward Curt Cunkle played in sixty-one games, scored 604 points, recovered 493 rebounds, and was a first-team All-SEC selection in 1953.
Robert E. Emrick Basketball 1954–57 Forward-center Bob Emrick played in ninety-one games, scored 1,535 points, made 514 free throws, and pulled down 869 rebounds. He was a two-time All-SEC selection, and a senior team captain. Emrick led the team in scoring for three seasons, averaged 16.7 points per game, and remains tenth on the Gators' career scoring list.
Udonis J. Haslem Basketball 1999–2002 Center Udonis Haslem scored 1,781 career points, made 515 free throws, recovered 861 rebounds, and remains third on the Gators' all-time scoring list. He was the first player in Gators basketball history to play in four consecutive NCAA Tournaments. Haslem was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, received All-American honors three times, and was a senior team captain. He has played eight seasons in the NBA.[14]
Brooks Henderson Basketball 1963–65 Guard Brooks Henderson played in sixty-six games, scored 1,001 points, pulled down 365 rebounds, and made 83.0 percent of his free throws. Henderson was a three-time All-SEC selection, and received All-American honors as a senior team captain.
Joe Hobbs Basketball 1956–58 Guard Joe Hobbs was a first-team All-SEC selection, an All-American, and a senior team captain. He scored 1,331 points, completed 84.3 percent of his free throws, and averaged 23.9 points per game as a senior. Memorably, he scored forty-one points against Georgia in 1958—still one of the four highest-scoring performances in team history. Hobbs was the first Gator to receive All-American basketball honors.
Gary J. Keller Basketball 1965–67 Center-forward Gary Keller led the team in scoring during the 1965–66 and 1966–67 seasons. In three seasons, he played in seventy-six games, scored 1,104 points, and recovered 855 rebounds. Keller was a first-team All-SEC selection and an Academic All-American. He played two seasons in the ABA.[15]
Tony Miller Basketball 1971–73 Guard Tony Miller led the Gators in scoring for three straight years, and led the SEC during the 1971–72 season with an average of 26.7 points per game. He was a first-team All-SEC selection, a senior team captain, an Academic All-American, and the recipient of an NCAA Post-Graduate Scholarship. Miller still holds the team record for most points scored in a single game (54). In three seasons, he scored 1,382 points.
Andrew Owens Basketball 1968–70 Forward Andy Owens was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, an All-American, an Academic All-American, a senior team captain, and an NCAA Post-Graduate Scholarship recipient. He scored 1,445 career points, and averaged 27.0 points per game during the 1969–70 season—still the team record. Owens was picked in the 1970 NBA Draft, attended law school after a brief pro career, and became a lawyer and circuit court judge.
Hans Tanzler Basketball 1947–50 Guard Hans Tanzler played in 100 games, led the Gators in scoring during the 1947–48 season, and scored 1,221 career points. He was an All-SEC selection, and a senior team captain. Tanzler was later elected mayor of the City of Jacksonville.
Neal E. Walk Basketball 1967–69 Center Neal Walk was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, a two-time All-American, and a senior team captain. He led the nation in rebounds per game during the 1967–68 season. In his three-year college career, he scored 1,600 points, completed 456 free throws, and pulled down 1,181 rebounds. The Phoenix Suns picked Walk in the first round of the 1969 NBA Draft, and he played in the NBA for eight seasons.[16]
Chip Williams Basketball 1973–75 Center Chip Williams was a first-team All-SEC selection and a senior team captain. In three seasons as a Gator, he played in seventy-six games, led the team in scoring during the 1973–74 season, scored 1,246 points, completed 72.4 percent of his free throws, and recovered 775 rebounds.
Ronnie Williams Basketball 1981–84 Forward Ronnie Williams was a four-year starter, the SEC Freshman of the Year, a four-time All-SEC selection, and a senior team captain. He led the Gators in scoring for four consecutive seasons, scored 2,090 career points (current team record) while completing 58.5 percent of his field goal attempts, pulled down 954 rebounds, and hit 546 free throws (current team record).

Women's basketball[edit]

The following Gator Greats are former members of the Florida Gators women's basketball team:

Name Sport Years Accomplishments
Quientella D. Bonner Basketball 1977–81 In her four years as a Gator, Quientella Bonner scored 1,798 points while shooting fifty-four percent from the floor, and pulling down 1,321 rebounds. Bonner finished her college career as the all-time leading scorer in the history of the Gators women's basketball program, and remains sixth on the Gators' career records list.[17]
Tammy E. Jackson Basketball 1982–85 Tammy Jackson was a three-time first-team All-SEC selection. During her four-year Gators career, she scored 1,895 points, recovered 1,141 rebounds, and blocked 121 shots on defense. She is the third leading scorer in Lady Gators basketball history.[17] Jackson was a member of the U.S. national teams that won a world championship in 1990, and an Olympic bronze medal in 1992.[18] She also played in the WNBA for six years.[19]
DeLisha Milton-Jones Basketball 1994–97 Delisha Milton was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, and a first-team All-American. She scored 1,858 points, pulled down 1,109 rebounds, made 172 blocks, and remains fourth on the Gators' career scoring list. She was the SEC Player of the Year, and the recipient of the Wade Trophy.[17] She was a U.S. national team member and won two Olympic gold medals.[20] She also played in the WNBA for twelve seasons.[21]
LaMurriel Page Basketball 1995–98 In her four seasons as a Gator, Murriel Page scored 1,915 points, completed fifty-five percent of her field attempts, and recovered 1,251 rebounds. She was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, and a first-team All-American. Page remains the second leading scorer in Lady Gators history.[17] She was selected third overall in the 1998 WNBA Draft, and played eight seasons in the WNBA.[22]
Sophia L. Witherspoon Basketball 1989–91 During her three-year college career, guard Sophia Witherspoon scored 1,381 points, pulled down 445 rebounds, and was recognized as a first-team All-SEC selection.[17] Witherspoon was selected with the seventh pick overall in the 1997 WNBA Draft, and played seven seasons in the WNBA.[23]

Boxing[edit]

The following Gator Greats are former members of the Florida Gators men's boxing team:

Name Sport Years Accomplishments
John G. Joca Boxing 1939–40 Boxer Johnny Joca won the NCAA national boxing championship in the 135-pound weight class in 1940. Joca was the first Florida Gators athlete, in any sport, to win an individual NCAA national championship.
Phillip D. O'Connell Boxing 1930–31 Phil O'Connell was the captain of the University of Florida boxing team for two years. During his professional welterweight boxing career, he compiled a record of six wins (one by knockout), two losses, and one draw. Afterward, he became a lawyer, municipal judge, and state's attorney.
Carlos R. Proctor Boxing Carlos Proctor was a Gator heavyweight boxer as an undergraduate, and then served as the team's head coach until the boxing program was suspended during World War II. During his brief professional boxing career, Proctor posted two wins, both by knockout, with no losses.

Football[edit]

The following Gator Greats are former members of the Florida Gators football team:

Name Sport Years Accomplishments
Frederic M. Abbott Football 1970–72 As the Gators' senior team captain in 1972, linebacker Fred Abbott was a first-team All-SEC selection, an Associated Press All-American, and the recipient of the team's Fergie Ferguson Award. Remarkably, he had switched from playing offensive guard as a junior to playing middle linebacker as a senior.[12] The Minnesota Vikings picked Abbott in the 1973 NFL Draft.
Carlos Alvarez Football 1969–71 Wide receiver Carlos Alvarez was one of the 1969 Gators' second-year stars known as the "Super Sophs," and set single season NCAA receiving records in virtually every category. He was recognized as a first team All-SEC selection and a consensus first-team All-American.[12] Alvarez was also a three-time Academic All-American, and is a member of the Academic All-American Hall of Fame and the College Football Hall of Fame.
C. Neal Anderson Football 1982–85 Running back Neal Anderson was a first-team All-SEC selection, and a two-time All-American. In his four years as a Gator, he had fourteen games with 100 yards or more rushing; 639 carries for 3,234 yards rushing and thirty touchdowns; forty-nine receptions for 525 yards receiving and two touchdowns; and ninety-seven yards passing.[12] The Chicago Bears selected Anderson in the first round of the 1986 NFL Draft.[24]
Reidel C. Anthony Football 1994–96 As a junior wide receiver, Reidel Anthony was a first-team All-SEC selection and a consensus first-team All-American. He played a key role in the Gators' 12–1 national championship season in 1996, catching seventy-two passes to lead the SEC with 1,293 yards, and setting a new SEC regular season record with eighteen touchdown catches.[12] The Tampa Buccaneers drafted Anthony in the first round of the 1997 NFL Draft.[25]
Raymond L. "Trace"
Armstrong, III
Football 1989 Trace Armstrong was a rare senior transfer who played only a single season at defensive tackle for the Gators, but it was a memorable one, as he set a new Gators single-season record by making nineteen tackles for a loss, including seven quarterback sacks. Armstrong was recognized as a first-team All-SEC selection and a first-team All-American.[12] The Chicago Bears picked him in the first round of the 1990 NFL Draft.[26]
John Barrow Football 1954–56 John Barrow was a two-way offensive and defensive lineman for the Gators in the mid-1950s. As a senior, he was recognized as first-team All-SEC selection and a first-team All-American.[12] Drafted by the NFL's Detroit Lions, he chose to play in the CFL instead, and was a thirteen-time CFL All-Star and a member of four Grey Cup championship teams. He is a member of the Canadian Football Hall of Fame.[27]
James E. Beaver Football 1959–61 Offensive lineman Jim Beaver was a two-time All-SEC selection, a senior team captain, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award.[12] He was drafted by the NFL's Philadelphia Eagles and the AFL's Buffalo Bills in 1963.
Jack H. Beckwith Football 1933–35 Jack Beckwith was a standout halfback and fullback for the Gators from 1933 to 1935.[12] As a sophomore in 1933, Beckwith turned in a memorable rushing and punting performance against Auburn that was the difference in the Gators' 14–7 homecoming victory.
Douglas R. Belden Basketball
Baseball
Football
1944–45
1945, 1947–48
1946–48
Doug Belden was a versatile three-sport letterman during a college career interrupted by military service. In football, he was the Gators' leading passer in 1947 and 1948.[12] He later played three seasons as a quarterback for the Saskatchewan Roughriders of the CFL.
Kerwin D. Bell Football 1984–87 Quarterback Kerwin Bell was a walk-on player who was eighth on the depth chart as a freshman. He subsequently earned an athletic scholarship, the starting position, a first-team All-SEC selection and All-American honors. In 1984 and 1985, he led the Gators to the their first two SEC first-place finishes. Bell finished his college career with 549 completions for 7,585 yards and fifty-six touchdowns.[12]
L. Bruce Bennett, Jr. Football 1963–65 As a senior team captain in 1965, defensive back Bruce Bennett was a first-team All-SEC selection and a United Press International first-team All-American, and led the Gators to their first-ever major bowl game. His thirteen career interceptions set a new Gators team record.[12] After college, Bennett played for the CFL's Saskatchewan Roughriders for seven seasons, including their 1966 Grey Cup championship team.[28]
Leroy R. "Red" Bethea Football 1928–30 As a senior team captain in 1930, Red Bethea rushed for 218 yards against the University of Chicago Maroons football team—still the third highest single-game rushing total in Gators history.[12]
Ernest J. "Goof" Bowyer Football 1926–28 Goof Bowyer was the senior team captain of the great Florida Gators football team of 1928.[12] Bowyer's '28 Gators set a new national single-season scoring record of 336 points and finished 8–1—the best season win-loss record in the first fifty-four years of Gators football.
Scot E. Brantley Football
Baseball
1976–79
1977
Linebacker Scot Brantley was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection and twice received All-American honors. Remembered for his physical play, he led the Gators in tackles during two seasons, and his career total of 467 tackles still ranks second in the Gators' records book.[12] Brantley's senior season was cut short by a severe concussion, but he later had a successful eight-year NFL career with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.[29]
Alex J. Brown Football 1998–2001 Alex Brown was a defensive end and a member of the Gators' 2000 SEC championship team. He was a three-time first-team All-SEC selection, and a consensus first-team All-American. In four years as a Gator, Brown totaled 161 tackles, with forty-seven tackles for a loss and thirty-three quarterback sacks—still the best in Gators team history.[12] Brown was drafted by the Chicago Bears and enjoyed a nine-year NFL career.[30]
Lomas Brown, Jr. Football 1981–84 Lomas Brown anchored the "Great Wall of Florida" offensive line and paved the way for the Gators' first undefeated SEC season in 1984. He was a first-team All-SEC selection, consensus first-team All-American, and the SEC's Jacobs Blocking Trophy winner.[12] The Detroit Lions selected him in the first round of the 1985 NFL Draft, and he received numerous Pro Bowl and All-Pro honors during his eighteen-year NFL career.[31]
Carl L. Brumbaugh Football 1927–28 Carl Brumbaugh was a quarterback and halfback who was a member of the 1928 Gators' "Phantom Four" backfield that set a new single-season national scoring record off 336 points, while posting an 8–1 win-loss record—the best record in Gators history until that time. Brumbaugh played professionally for the Chicago Bears and was a member of two of the Bears' NFL championship teams.[32]
Glenn S. Cameron Football 1971–74 Linebacker Glenn Cameron was a first-team All-SEC selection and an Associated Press All-American.[12] The Cincinnati Bengals selected him in the first round of the 1975 NFL Draft, and he played 159 games for the Bengals during his eleven NFL seasons—including Super Bowl XVI.[33] After Cameron retired from professional football, he returned to the University of Florida and earned a law degree.
Kevin L. Carter Football 1991–94 Kevin Carter was a standout defensive end, and was a member of the Gators' first three SEC championship football teams in 1991, 1993 and 1994. As a senior, he was a first-team All-SEC selection, a consensus first-team All-American, and was recognized by 'Football News as its Defensive Player of the Year.[12] The St. Louis Rams selected Carter in the first round of the 1995 NFL Draft, and he played fourteen NFL seasons.[34]
William C. Carr, III Football 1964–66 Center Bill Carr started thirty-two consecutive games in his three seasons on the Gators varsity. As a senior in 1966, he was a first-team All-SEC selection, a first-team All-American, and the offensive team captain.[12] He and his roommate, quarterback Steve Spurrier, led the Gators to their first-ever major bowl game victory in the 1967 Orange Bowl. Carr later served as the athletic director for the Florida Gators and Houston Cougars.
Richard J. Casares Football
Basketball
1951–53
1952–53
Halfback Rick Casares was the Gators' leading rusher and an All-SEC selection in 1952, spurring the team to an 8–3 season and their first-ever bowl game. Casares, who was also a placekicker, scored a touchdown and two extra points in the team's 14–13 Gator Bowl win.[12] Casares was drafted by the Chicago Bears and played twelve NFL seasons.[13] He became the Bears' leading rusher until later eclipsed by Walter Payton.
Charles A. Casey Football
Baseball
1963–65
1965
Wide receiver Charley Casey was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, a first-team All-American, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award. Casey had six games with 100 or more yards receiving, led the team in receiving yardage in 1964 and 1965, and finished his college career as the leading receiver in SEC history.[12] He was drafted by the Atlanta Falcons.
Rainey Cawthon Football 1927–29 Rainey Cawthon was a member of the 1928 Gators' "Phantom Four" backfield that led the team in setting a new national single-season scoring record of 336 points, while compiling an 8–1 win-loss record—the best in the first five decades of Gators football.
Donald G. Chandler Football 1954–55 Don Chandler was a junior transfer who played halfback, punter and placekicker. As a senior in 1955, Chandler led all major college punters with an average kick of 44.3 yards, narrowly beating out Earl Morrall. Memorably, he booted a 76-yard punt in 1955—still tied for the second longest punt in Gators history.[12] Chandler was drafted by the New York Giants, and played in twelve NFL seasons.[35]
Wesley S. Chandler Football 1974–77 Wide receiver Wes Chandler was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, a two-time first-team All-American, a first-team Academic All-American, the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award, and a senior team captain.[12] The New Orleans Saints made him the third overall pick in the 1978 NFL Draft, and he compiled 8,966 receiving yards and sixty-seven touchdowns in eleven NFL seasons.[36]
William W. Chase Football 1933–35 Billy Chase was an All-SEC selection and the senior team captain in 1935. Memorably, he returned a kickoff ninety-eight yards against Ole Miss in 1934.[12]
Hagood Clarke, III Football 1961–63 Hagood Clarke was a walk-on defensive back, punter and punt returner. He led the Gators in punt return yardage in 1961 and 1962, booted 46 punts for 1,884 yards in 1962, and was the recipient of the Fergie Ferguson Award in 1963.[12] The Buffalo Bills drafted him in 1964, and he played five years in the AFL—including the Bills' 1964 and 1965 AFL championship seasons. He earned All-AFL and AFL All-Star honors.[37]
A. Cris Collinsworth Football 1977–80 Recruited as an option quarterback, he achieved his greatest success as a converted wide receiver: three-time first-team All-SEC selection, first-team All-American, first-team Academic All-American, and senior team captain.[12] The Cincinnati Bengals picked him in the second round of the 1981 NFL Draft, and he received numerous All-Pro and Pro Bowl honors during his eight-season NFL career.[38]
William W. Corry Football 1940–42 Fullback Bill Corry was a senior team captain in 1942.[12]
Clyde Crabtree Basketball
Football
1928–29
1927–29
"Cannonball" Clyde Crabtree was a member of the "Phantom Four" backfield of the 1928 Gators team that scored 336 points (a new national single-season scoring record) and compiled an 8–1 win-loss record (the Gators' best-ever record until that time). Crabtree received All-American honors in 1928, and later played for two different NFL teams.[39]
J. Broward
"Brad" Culpepper
Football 1988–91 Brad Culpepper was a first-team All-SEC selection, a first-team All-American, and recipient of the 1991 Draddy Trophy, recognizing him as the outstanding student-athlete in college football. As a senior team captain, he led the Gators to their first officially recognized SEC championship in 1991.[12] Culpepper was drafted by the Minnesota Vikings and played nine seasons in the NFL.[40]
Joseph F. D'Agostino, Jr. Football 1951–53 A two-way offensive and defensive lineman, Joe D'Agostino was an honorable mention All-American and twice received first-team All-SEC honors.[12] D'Agostino was a key member of the outstanding offensive line that paved the way for Gators backs Rick Casares, Papa Hall and Buford Long during the team's 1952 Gator Bowl season.
Judd D. Davis Football 1992–94 Placekicker Judd Davis was a walk-on who earned first-team All-SEC and first-team All-American honors. He was the recipient of the Lou Groza Award, recognizing the best placekicker in college football, in 1993. Davis completed over eighty-two percent of his field goals attempts, and 121 of 129 point-after-touchdown (PAT) attempts, including all sixty-five of his PAT attempts in 1994.[12]
Stephen J. DeLaTorre Football 1952–55 Steve DeLaTorre was a two-way offensive center and linebacker. As a senior team captain in 1955, he was a first-team All-SEC selection and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award.[12]
J. Franklin Dempsey Football 1946–49 Frank Dempsey was a standout two-way offensive and defensive lineman during the Gators' ironically named "Golden Era" of the late 1940s, and was a major factor in the rushing success of All-SEC tailback Chuck Hunsinger. After college, Dempsey played four seasons for the NFL's Chicago Bears,[41] and two more seasons in the CFL, where he was named an Eastern All-Star in 1955.[42]
Guy D. Dennis Football 1966–68 Offensive lineman Guy Dennis was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, a first-team All-American, a senior team captain, and a recipient of the team's Fergie Ferguson Award.[12] Dennis was drafted by the Cincinnati Bengals, and he played seven NFL seasons for the Bengals and Detroit Lions.[43]
Dwayne K. Dixon Football 1980–83 Wide receiver Dwayne Dixon was a first-team All-SEC selection, an All-American, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award. He led the team in receiving yardage in 1982 and 1983.[12] Dixon signed with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 1984, and enjoyed a seven-year professional career,[44] before returning to Gainesville to become an assistant coach.
Christopher P. Doering Football 1993–95 Wide receiver Chris Doering was a walk-on player who earned an athletic scholarship, a first-team All-SEC selection, and All-American honors. As a starter, he was a member of three consecutive SEC championship teams, and became a team captain as a senior. He finished his Gators career with 2,107 receiving yards and thirty-one touchdowns.[12] After college, he played in the NFL for nine seasons.[45]
Jimmy D. DuBose Football 1973–75 Running back Jimmy DuBose rushed for 1,307 yards as a senior in 1975. He was a first-team All-SEC selection, the SEC Player of the Year, an All-American, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award. DuBose finished in fifth place in the 1975 Heisman Trophy balloting.[12] A second-round draft pick of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, his NFL career was cut short by a knee injury.
Lawrence W. Dupree Football 1962–64 Fullback Larry Dupree was a senior team captain, three-time first-team All-SEC selection, first-team All-American, and recipient of the team's Fergie Ferguson Award. Dupree led the Gators in rushing yardage for three seasons, and finished his college career with 1,725 yards.[12]
Thomas L. Durrance Football 1969–71 Running back Tommy Durrance was one of the "Super Sophs" of 1969, and received a first-team All-SEC selection and All-American honors. During his sophomore season, he scored 110 points—then the team record, and still tied for second on the Gators' single-season records list. Durrance finished his three-year college career with 2,582 yards of combined rushing and receiving yardage.[12]
J. Rex Farrior, Sr. Football
Baseball
1913–16
1915–17
Rex Farrior was a two-sport athlete in football and baseball. A four-year football letterman and starter, he was the team's captain in 1916.[12] Farrior later returned to the university to earn a law degree and served as the Gators' head baseball coach in 1924. He became a founding partner in a prominent Tampa-based law firm, and remained one of the biggest boosters of the Florida Gators sports program until his death.
Forest K. Ferguson, Jr. Football 1939–41 As a two-way receiver and defensive end, Fergie Ferguson set Gators career receiving records that would endure for over twenty years. As a senior in 1941, he received All-American honors. As a U.S Army lieutenant, Ferguson received the Distinguished Service Cross for his heroism under fire during the 1944 D-Day invasion; he was critically wounded and later died as a result. The Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award is named in his honor.[12]
Donald D. Fleming Football
Baseball
1956–58
1958–60
A two-way defensive back and wide receiver, Don Fleming was the Gators' team captain in 1958, and finished his college football career as a first-team All-SEC selection.[12] Coach Bob Woodruff ranked him as the Gators' best receiver of the 1950s. Fleming was signed by the Cleveland Browns in 1960, and was an All-NFL selection in 1962.[46] His three-year professional career was cut short by his accidental death in 1963.
Robert G. Forbes Football 1944–47 Back Bobby Forbes was an All-SEC selection in 1944, when he set a new Florida Field single-game rushing record with a 177-yard performance.[12] Forbes' career was interrupted by World War II military service, but his post-war highlights included an 80-yard touchdown run against Auburn, and an 88-yard kickoff return versus Furman, both in 1947.[12]
Lawrence J. Gagner Football 1963–65 Guard Larry Gagner was a first-team All-SEC selection in 1964 and 1965, and a first-team All-American in 1965. As a senior offensive lineman, Gagner participated in the 1966 Sugar Bowl, the Gators' first-ever major bowl appearance.[12] Gagner was a second-round draft pick of the Pittsburgh Steelers and enjoyed a successful five-year NFL career.[47]
David L. Galloway, Sr. Football 1977–80 Defensive tackle and end David Galloway was a star lineman under two different head coaches. As a junior, he was a key member of the Gators defense that led the biggest one-year turnaround in NCAA history. As a senior team captain in 1981, Galloway was a first-team All-SEC selection, and a first-team All-American.[12] The St. Louis Cardinals picked Galloway in the second round of the 1982 NFL Draft, and he played in the NFL for nine seasons.[48]
Max Goldstein Football 1923–25 Goldy Goldstein was a standout lineman on the Gators teams of the mid-1920s, and received All-Southern honors as a senior in 1925. Goldstein was among the very first Gator alumni to ever play professional football.
Bobby Joe Green Football
Track & field
1958–59
1959–60
Bobby Joe Green was a punter and halfback. As a senior, he kicked fifty-four punts for an average distance of 44.9 yards—still the Gators' single-season record. His 82-yard punt against Georgia in 1958 remains the longest by a Gator in the modern era.[12] Green was also a sprinter and high jumper on the Gators track and field team. After college, Green played in the NFL for fourteen seasons, and was a Pro Bowl selection in 1970.[49]
Samuel L. Green Football 1972–75 Linebacker Sammy Green was a first-team All-SEC selection, a consensus first-team All-American, and a senior team captain.[12] As a sophomore in 1973, he forced a critical fumble that led to a touchdown and the Gators' margin of victory in a 12–8 upset of the Auburn Tigers at home—the Gators' first-ever win at Jordan-Hare Stadium. The Seattle Seahawks drafted Green in the second round of the 1980 NFL Draft.[50]
Rex D. Grossman, III Football 2000–02 Quarterback Rex Grossman was a first-team All-SEC selection, a consensus first-team All-American, and the runner-up for the Heisman Trophy as a sophomore in 2001.[12] He led the Gators to an SEC championship in 2000, and threw for over 9,000 yards in his three-year career. The Chicago Bears drafted Grossman in the first round of the 2003 NFL Draft, and he started in the Super Bowl for the Bears in 2007.[51]
J. Lewis "Papa" Hall, Jr. Football
Track & field
1950–52
1951–53
Papa Hall and fellow backs Buford Long and Rick Casares formed the Gators' winning rushing attack during the team's 8–3 season in 1952, and he ran for ninety-four yards in the team's 14–13 Gator Bowl victory on New Year's Day.[12] Hall was also an NCAA national champion high jumper in track and field. After college, he decided against a professional football career, and became an attorney and circuit court judge.
Malcolm E. Hammack Football 1953–54 Mal Hammack was a two-way running back and linebacker. As a senior in 1954, he was an All-SEC selection and the first recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award, recognizing the "senior football player who displays outstanding leadership, character and courage."[12] Coach Bob Woodruff rated him as one of the Gators' five best offensive backs of the 1950s. Hammack was a fullback in the NFL for twelve seasons.[52]
Velles A. Heckman Football 1956–58 Vel Heckman was a standout two-way offensive and defensive tackle. As a senior in 1958, he was a first-team All-SEC selection and a first-team All-American.[12] He was drafted by the San Francisco 49ers, but walked away from professional football to become a high school football coach.
Isaac J. Hilliard Football 1994–96 Wide receiver Ike Hilliard was a first team All-SEC selection and a consensus first-team All-American as a junior in 1996. He and fellow All-American wideout Reidel Anthony both compiled over 1,000 receiving yards and were key factors in the Gators' offense during their 1996 national championship season.[12] The New York Giants picked Hilliard in the first round of the 1997 NFL Draft, and he played in the NFL for twelve seasons.[53]
Marcelino Huerta, Jr. Football 1947–49 Guard "Chelo" Huerta was a standout two-way lineman during one of the darkest times of Gators football, the ironically named "Golden Era" of the late 1940s. The stellar line play of Huerta and teammates Frank Dempsey and Jimmy Kynes was a major reason for the All-SEC success of running back Chuck Hunsinger. Huerta became a successful college head coach, and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 2002.[54]
Charles R. Hunsinger Football 1946–49 Halfback Chuck Hunsinger was one of the Gators' bright lights during the dismal "Golden Era" of the post-war 1940s. He was a first-team All-SEC selection in 1948 and 1949. Memorably, Hunsinger rushed for 174 yards and three touchdowns in the 1949 Gators' upset of the Georgia Bulldogs.[12] He was drafted by the Chicago Bears in the first round of the 1950 NFL Draft, and he played six seasons in the NFL and CFL.[55][56]
Randall B. Jackson Football 1964–65 Tackle Randy Jackson was a standout lineman on both offense and defense. As a senior in 1965, he was a member of the first Gators team to play in a major New Year's Day bowl game.[12] The Chicago Bears drafted Jackson, and he played for the Bears in 105 games at offensive tackle over eight seasons.[57]
Willie B. Jackson, Jr. Football 1991–93 Wide receiver Willie Jackson, Jr. was the son of former Gators wide receiver Willie Jackson, Sr. The younger Jackson led the team in receiving twice, was a first-team All-SEC selection, and received All-American honors three times. He finished his college career with 162 receptions for 2,172 yard and twenty-four touchdowns—which remains fifth on the Gators' records list.[12] Jackson played nine seasons in the NFL.[58]
John W. James, Jr. Football 1970–71 Punter John James was a walk-on player who earned the starting position in 1970 and 1971, and kicked fifty-seven punts for an average distance of 40.3 yards during his senior year in 1971.[12] The Atlanta Falcons signed James in 1972, and he played thirteen seasons in the NFL, and was a three-time Pro Bowl selection.[59]
Alonzo Johnson Football 1981–85 Linebacker Alonzo Johnson was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, two-time first-team All-American, and two-time team captain. He was a key member of the Gators defense that produced two first-place SEC finishes in 1984 and 1985. He finished his college career with 335 tackles, fifty-five tackles for a loss, and twenty-seven quarterback sacks.[12] The Philadelphia Eagles picked him in the second round of the 1986 NFL Draft.[60]
Ellis B. Johnson Football 1991–94 As a senior team captain on the Gators' 1994 SEC championship team, defensive lineman Ellis Johnson was a first-team All-SEC selection, an All-American, CNN's National Defensive Player of the Year, and the team's most valuable player. He finished his Gators career with 16.3 quarterback sacks and 26.8 tackles for a loss.[12] Ellis was a first-round draft pick of the Indianapolis Colts.[61]
Edgar C. Jones Football
Basketball
1923–25
1924–25
Halfback Edgar Jones was the senior team captain of the 1925 Gators team that finished 8–2—the best record in the first twenty seasons of the Gators football team. Jones scored sixteen touchdowns and 108 points—still fifth on the Gators' records list.[12] He was also a two-time captain of the basketball team. Jones later returned to the university as an assistant coach and athletic director.
James R. Jones Football 1979–82 Running back James Jones was a two-time team captain, two-time first-team All-SEC selection, an All-American, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award. He finished his college career with 2,026 yards rushing, 593 yards receiving, and forty-eight yards passing.[12] The Detroit Lions picked Jones in the first round of the 1983 NFL Draft, and he played in ten NFL seasons.[62]
James W. Kynes Football 1946–49 Jimmy Kynes was a two-way offensive and defensive lineman and a senior team captain in 1949. He was one of the great players of the worst time in Gators football history, the ironically named "Golden Era" of the late 1940s. Kynes later served as the attorney general of Florida. His hard-nosed line play is memorialized in the James W. Kynes Award, awarded annually to the best Gator lineman.
William L. Kynes Football 1975–76 Billy Kynes was a starting quarterback and a Rhodes Scholar.
Charles W. LaPradd Football 1950–52 Initially an unrecruited walk-on, two-way defensive and offensive tackle Charlie LaPradd was a first-team All-SEC selection and an Associated Press first-team All-American.[12] Described as a man among boys by his teammates, the former paratrooper and team captain developed a ferocious reputation on defense, and was a key man on the Gators defense during the team's 8–3 bowl season in 1952.
R. Burton Lawless Football 1972–74 Guard Burton Lawless was a three-year starter, a two-time All-SEC selection, and a first-team All-American.[12] The Dallas Cowboys picked Lawless in the second round of the 1975 NFL Draft, and he played in eighty-two NFL games over six seasons, including Super Bowl XII.[63]
Lawrence P.
Libertore, Jr.
Football 1960–62 Larry Libertore was a small, but quick-on-his-feet option quarterback and defensive back. He was a key member of the Gators offense during the team's 9–2 Gator Bowl season in 1960—the first time the Gators ever won nine games in a season.[64] Libertore's 786 rushing yards remained the most by a Gators quarterback until eclipsed by Tim Tebow in 2007.[12]
David L. Little Football 1977–80 Linebacker David Little was a first-team All-SEC selection, a consensus first-team All-American, a senior team captain, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award. He finished his four-year college career with 475 tackles—still the Gators' all-time career record.[12] Little played in 179 games over twelve seasons for the Pittsburgh Steelers.[65]
Buford E. Long Football 1950–52 Buford Long was a two-way standout at halfback and defensive back. He was part of the Gators' 1952 backfield that included fullback Rick Casares and halfback Papa Hall and led the team to an 8–3 record and a 14–13 victory in the 1952 Gator Bowl—the Gators' first-ever NCAA-sanctioned bowl game. Long played for the NFL's New York Giants for three seasons.[66]
Wilber B. Marshall Football 1980–83 Linebacker Wilber Marshall was the core of the Gators' defense from 1980 to 1983. He was a three-time first-team All-SEC selection, a two-time consensus first-team All-American, and ABC Sports' Defensive Player of the Year.[12] The Chicago Bears picked Marshall in the first round of the 1984 NFL Draft, and he played in twelve NFL seasons.[67] He is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame and the Gator Ring of Honor.[68]
Lynn O. Matthews Football 1963–65 Defensive end Lynn Matthews was a three-year starter, a two-time All-SEC selection, and a first-team All-American.[12] He was a key man in the Gators defense that made possible the team's first-ever Sugar Bowl invitation. Coach Ray Graves rated Matthews as the Gators' best defensive end of the 1960s.
M. Shane Matthews Football 1989–92 Shane Matthews was a three-year starting quarterback under head coach Steve Spurrier, and led the Gators to their first officially recognized SEC championship in 1991. Matthews led the SEC in passing for three consecutive seasons, and was a three-time first-team All-SEC selection. As a senior team captain, he was also recognized as an All-American.[12] Matthews played in the NFL for fourteen seasons.[69]
Walter "Tiger" Mayberry Football 1935–37 Quarterback Tiger Mayberry was one of the greatest natural athletes to ever suit up for the Gators, and distinguished himself as a passer, runner, "coffin corner" punter, and senior team captain. During World War II, he served as a U.S. Marine Corps fighter pilot. Captured by the Japanese after ditching his damaged aircraft in the Pacific Ocean, Mayberry died in a prisoner of war camp.[70]
Lee C. McGriff Football 1972–74 Wide receiver Lee McGriff was a walk-on player who became a first-team All-SEC selection, an All-American, a senior team captain, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award. McGriff led the SEC in receiving yardage in 1974 with 698 yards.[12] After college, he played for the NFL's Tampa Bay Buccaneers for a single season.[71]
Perry C. McGriff, Jr. Baseball
Football
1958–60
1958–59
Perry McGriff was an outstanding two-sport athlete in baseball and football. As a football wide receiver, he led the Gators in pass receptions and yardage and was an All-American selection in 1959.[12] As a baseball player, he was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection and a first-team All-American. McGriff was later elected to the Gainesville city commission, the Alachua County commission, and the Florida House of Representatives.
F. Graham McKeel Football 1964,
1966–67
Fullback Fred McKeel was a senior team captain in 1967.[12] Memorably, McKeel scored two of the Gators' touchdowns in their 27–12 upset win over Georgia Tech in the 1967 Orange Bowl—the Gators' first-ever major bowl victory.
Victor R. Miranda Football 1957–58,
1960
As a senior in 1960, guard Vic Miranda was a first-team All-SEC selection, an All-American, and the recipient of the team's Fergie Ferguson Award.[12] A two-way offensive and defensive lineman, Miranda was a key leader of the 1960 Gators squad that finished 9–2 and defeated Baylor 13–12 to win the 1960 Gator Bowl.
Fred Y. Montsdeoca, Jr. Football
Baseball
1948–50
1948–51
Punter Fred Montsdeoca was one of the standouts of the Gators' ironically named "Golden Era" of the late 1940s. His superior punting was the key to keeping the overmatched Gators competitive in many games. Memorably, in 1949, he punted seven times against Alabama for an average of fifty-three yards per kick. In baseball, Montsdeoca led the Gators with twenty-six runs batted in and a batting average of .422 in 1951.[3]
Nathaniel Moore Football 1972–73 Running back Nat Moore was a junior transfer. In 1973, he led the Gators with 145 rushes for 845 yards and nine rushing touchdowns, twenty-five receptions for 351 receiving yards and four touchdown catches, and 230 return yards, while earning first-team All-SEC and All-American accolades.[12] In thirteen NFL seasons with the Miami Dolphins, Moore registered 510 catches for 7,547 yards and seventy-four touchdowns.[72]
A. Dennis Murphy Football 1962–64 Two-way offensive and defensive tackle Dennis Murphy was an All-SEC selection and a first-team All-American in 1964.[12] He played a single season for the NFL's Chicago Bears in 1965.[73]
Richard R. Nattiel Football 1983–86 Nicknamed the "Rocket" by his Gators teammates, wide receiver Ricky Nattiel was a first-team All-SEC selection, an All-American, a senior team captain, and the recipient of the team's Fergie Ferguson Award. He finished his college career with 117 receptions for 2,086 yards and eighteen touchdowns; he also had 589 yards in punt returns.[12] Nattiel was a first round NFL Draft choice of the Denver Broncos.[74]
Robert D. "Ark" Newton Football
Basketball
1921–24
1922–23
An Arkansas native, Newton was nicknamed "Ark" by his teammates. He was the outstanding Gators football player of the early 1920s, and was described as "a superb punter and classic broken field runner, fearless and football-wise." Newton was the senior captain of the 1924 team that upset coach Wallace Wade's Alabama Crimson Tide 16–6 in Tuscaloosa. Coach James Van Fleet rated him as the best player of his tenure.
Jason B. Odom Football 1992–95 Offensive lineman Jason Odom was a four-year starter, a first-team All-SEC selection, a unanimous first-team All-American, and a senior team captain. He was also the recipient of the SEC's Jacobs Blocking Trophy. In his four years as a Gator, the team won three consecutive SEC championships, and played for a Bowl Alliance national championship.[12] Odom played four NFL seasons with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.[75]
Louis Oliver, III Football 1985–88 Free safety Louis Oliver was a walk-on player who earned an athletic scholarship, a starting position, two first-team All-SEC selections, and consensus first-team All-American honors. He was also the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award. In four years as a Gator, he totaled eleven interceptions.[12] A first round NFL Draft choice of the Miami Dolphins, Oliver played eight seasons professionally.[76]
Ralph Ortega Football 1972–74 Linebacker Ralph Ortega finished his college career with 357 tackles, twelve forced fumbles (eight recovered), and five interceptions. He was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, a first-team All-American, an Academic All-American, and the senior team captain.[12] The Atlanta Falcons picked Ortega in the second round of the 1975 NFL Draft, and he played six seasons for the Falcons and Miami Dolphins.[77]
Richard A. Pace Football
Baseball
1947–50
1948–50
Dick Pace was a three-sport standout in football, basketball and baseball. As a senior baseball player in 1950, he led the team in home runs. Pace later became a long-time SEC basketball and football referee and game official.
Bernard P. Parrish Football
Baseball
1955–57
1956–58
Bernie Parrish was a standout two-way halfback and defensive back, and also played baseball. As a junior second baseman, he batted .433 and led the Gators in runs batted in, hits, doubles and home runs, received first-team All-SEC honors, and was the Gators' first-ever first-team baseball All-American. Parrish played eight seasons for the NFL's Cleveland Browns, and was a member of the Browns' 1964 NFL championship team.[78]
Patrick N. Patchen Football 1958–60 Two-way end Pat Patchen was a first-team All-SEC selection and the recipient of the Gator's Fergie Ferguson award in 1960.[12]
Wayne L. Peace Football 1980–83 Quarterback Wayne Peace was a four-year starter, an All-SEC selection, and an All-American. During his four-year Gator career, he completed 610 of 991 attempts for 7,286 yards. Memorably, as a freshman he threw for 271 yards and two touchdowns in the Gators' 37–20 victory over the Maryland Terrapins in the 1980 Tangerine Bowl. Peace's 61.6 percent completion average remains the second best in team history.[12]
Michael W. Pearson Football 1999–2001 Offensive lineman Mike Pearson was a member of the Gators' 2000 SEC championship team, a first-team All-SEC selection twice, and a consensus All-American.[12] The Jacksonville Jaguars chose him in the second round of the 2002 NFL Draft, and he played four seasons for the Jaguars and another for the CFL's Toronto Argonauts.[79]
Carl E. "Tootie" Perry Football 1916,
1919–21
Tootie Perry was a two-way offensive and defensive lineman, among the largest Gators of the day at 5-foot-10 and 235 pounds, and developed a special talent for blocking punts. Perry was an All-Southern selection in 1920 and 1921, and the senior team captain in 1921.
P. Michael Peterson Football 1995–98 Linebacker Mike Peterson was a first-team All-SEC selection, a first-team All-American, and a senior team captain. He posted 249 tackles, three forced fumbles, thirteen tackles for a loss and 8.5 sacks, and was selected by his teammates as the Gators' most valuable player.[12] The Atlanta Falcons selected Peterson in the second round of the 1999 NFL Draft, and he remains an active NFL veteran after thirteen seasons.[80]
Ashley W. Ramsdell Football
Basketball
Baseball
1913–15
1914–16
1915–16
Quarterback Rammy Ramsdell was a three-year letterman and one of the Gators' great talents of the 'teens. Ramsdell's college football career was prematurely ended when he broke his leg playing baseball at the end of his junior year.[81]
Keiwan J. Ratliff Football 2000–03 Keiwan Ratliff played cornerback, wide receiver and special teams for the Gators.[82] He was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, a consensus All-American, and the SEC Defensive Player of the Year.[12] He finished his four-year college career with 860 punt return yards and 12 interceptions.[12] After college, he was drafted by the Cincinnati Bengals in the second round of the NFL Draft and played seven seasons in the NFL.[83]
T. Johnson Reaves Football 1969–71 Quarterback John Reaves was a three-season starter, a first-team All-SEC selection, and a first-team All-American.[12] He was one of the "Super Sophs," the 1969 Gators' second-year stars who led the team to its all-time best record of 9–1–1 and an upset victory over Tennessee in the Gator Bowl. The Philadelphia Eagles picked Reaves in the first round of the 1972 NFL Draft, and he played fourteen seasons in the NFL and USFL.[84]
Errict U. Rhett Football 1990–93 Tailback Errict Rhett was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, a first-team All-American, and a senior team captain. In four college seasons, he totaled 4,163 rushing yards and thirty-four touchdowns, and 1,230 yards receiving and two touchdown receptions; he remains the Gators' all-time leader in career rushing yardage.[12] He was a second round draft pick of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, and he played in the NFL for seven seasons.[85]
Huey L. Richardson, Jr. Football 1987–90 Defensive end Huey Richardson was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, a first-team All-American, and a senior team captain. At the conclusion of his four years as a Gator, he totaled 26.5 quarterback sacks and 50.5 tackles for a loss.[12] The Pittsburgh Steelers chose Richardson in the first round of the 1991 NFL Draft.[86]
James W. Rountree Football 1955–57 Jim Rountree was a two-way halfback and defensive back, a first-team All-SEC selection, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award.[12] Coach Bob Woodruff ranked him as one the Gators' two best defensive backs and one of their two best running backs of the 1950s. Rountree played defensive back and wide receiver for the CFL's Toronto Argonauts from 1958 to 1967, and was a seven-time CFL All-Star.[87]
LaMar Sarra Football
Basketball
Baseball
1924–26
1925–27
1925–27
LaMar Sarra was a versatile three-sport letterman who was the captain of both the Florida Gators baseball and football teams in 1926.[12]
Thomas J. Shannon, Jr. Football
Baseball
1962–64
1964–66
Quarterback Tom Shannon was a two-year starter who led the Gators to a 17–7 upset victory over Penn State in the 1962 Gator Bowl. Shannon also played first base for the Gators baseball team and scored twenty-five runs in 1964.
John M. Simpson Football 1953–56 Jackie Simpson was a two-way halfback and defensive back, and a three-time All-SEC selection.[12] Head coach Bob Woodruff ranked him as one of the Gators' three best running backs and the best defensive back of the 1950s. His 100-yard interception return in 1955 remains the longest in SEC history. Simpson was drafted by the Baltimore Colts, and he was a member of the Colts' NFL Championship teams in 1958 and 1959.[88]
Emmitt J. Smith, III Football 1987–89 Tailback Emmitt Smith rushed for 3,829 yards and thirty-six touchdowns, and was a three-time first-team All-SEC selection, and unanimous first-team All-American.[12] The Dallas Cowboys chose Smith in the first round of the 1990 NFL Draft, and he became the all-time leading NFL rusher with 18,355 yards and 164 touchdowns.[89] He is a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, the College Football Hall of Fame, and the Gator Ring of Honor.[12][90]
W. Lawrence Smith Football 1966–68 Tailback Larry Smith was a three-year starter, a three-time first-team All-SEC selection, a first-team All-American, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award. He finished his college football career with 528 carries for 2,186 yards and twenty-four touchdowns, and 607 yards receiving.[12] The Los Angeles Rams picked Smith in the first round of the 1969 NFL Draft, and he played in the NFL for six years.[91]
Stephen O. Spurrier Football 1964–66 Quarterback Steve Spurrier was a first-team All-SEC selection, a consensus first-team All-American, and the winner of the 1966 Heisman Trophy. Spurrier returned to Florida as head coach in 1990, and led the Gators to their first officially recognized SEC championship in 1991, and their first-ever national championship in 1996.[12] He is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame and the Gator Ring of Honor.[92]
Malcolm E. Steen Football 1967–69 Mac Steen was an offensive lineman who coach Ray Graves rated as the Gators' best right tackle of the 1960s. As the offensive team captain in 1969, Steen led the Gators to an upset 14–13 Gator bowl victory over the Tennessee Volunteers, and a 9–1–1 overall win-loss record—the best in Florida Gators history until that time.[12]
Haywood C. Sullivan Baseball
Football
1951–52
1950–51
Haywood Sullivan was a two-sport standout in baseball and football, and is generally rated as the best passing quarterback of the first fifty years of the Gators football program. His equally strong baseball talent led to him receiving a Major League Baseball bonus contract from the Boston Red Sox in 1952, and he rose from team catcher to general manager, and ultimately, to general partner of the Red Sox franchise.
John R. Symank Football 1955–56 John Symank was a junior transfer to Florida. Coach Bob Woodruff rated him as one of the Gators' five best defensive backs of the 1950s, and among their ten best offensive backs of the decade. The Green Bay Packers picked him in the impossibly low twenty-third round of the 1957 NFL Draft, but Symank rose to become one of the defensive stars of coach Vince Lombardi's 1961 and 1962 NFL Championship teams.[93]
Steven O. Tannen Football 1967–69 Defensive back Steve Tannen was a first-team All-SEC selection, a first-team All-American, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award.[12] Memorably, he blocked a punt that led to the winning score in the Gators' 14–13 upset of the Tennessee Volunteers in the 1969 Gator Bowl. The New York Jets picked Tannen in the first round of the 1970 NFL Draft, and he played for the Jets for five seasons.[94]
Earl A. "Dummy" Taylor Football 1908,
1910–12
Dummy Taylor was one of the greatest athletes of the Florida football team's early years. He was described by contemporaneous newspaper accounts as a legendary broken field runner and a master of the hidden ball trick, and could drop-kick field goals on the run from impossible angles. He was the team captain in 1910 and a prominent member of the Gators' Cigar Bowl team of 1912.
Frederick A. Taylor Football 1994–97 Running back Fred Taylor earned first-team All-SEC and first-team All-American honors. His coaches picked him as a team captain, and his teammates chose him as their most valuable player in 1997. During his college career, he rushed for 3,075 yards and thirty-one touchdowns.[12] The Jacksonville Jaguars picked Taylor in the first round of the 1998 NFL Draft, and he totaled 11,695 rushing yards during his thirteen-season NFL career.[95]
Allen R. Trammell, Jr. Football
Baseball
1963–65
1964–65
Two-way defensive back and wide receiver Allen Trammell was a walk-on player who earned an All-SEC selection.[12] He was the Gators' leading punt returner in 1964, and Coach Ray Graves rated him as one of the Gators' two best cornerbacks of the 1960s. Trammell was signed by the Houston Oilers in 1966.[96]
Richard E. Trapp Football
Baseball
1965–67
1967–68
In his three-season college career, wide receiver Richard Trapp led the Gators in receiving yardage in 1966 and 1967, and compiled 1,783 receiving yards. He had eight games with 100 yards or more receiving, including 171 yards against the Georgia Bulldogs in 1967. He twice received first-team All-SEC honors, and was the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award as a senior.[12][97]
Dale H. Van Sickel Football
Basketball
Football
1927–29

1929
Dale Van Sickel was the first University of Florida athlete, in any sport, to receive first-team All-American honors. He was recognized as a first-team All-American as a two-way defensive end and receiver on the great Gators football team of 1928, and received honorable mention All-American honors again in 1929. After graduation, Van Sickel became a Hollywood stuntman and actor.[12]
Ion "Speedy" Walker Football
Basketball
1926–27
1927–28
Speedy Walker was the smallest member of the Gators' 1926 and 1927 backfields at 133 pounds, but he could run, pass and kick with equal dexterity. Walker was a key contributor to the Gators' 7–3 season in 1927. He was also the senior captain of the basketball team during the 1927–28 season.
David W. Williams Football 1985–88 Offensive lineman David Williams started in every game during his four-season college career, including the Gators' first-place SEC season in 1985. He was a two-time first-team ALL-SEC selection, an All-American, and a senior team captain.[12] Williams was a first-round draft pick of the Houston Oilers and started in 106 games during his nine-season NFL career.[98]
Jarvis E. Williams Football 1984–87 Strong safety Jarvis Williams started forty-five consecutive games (the second highest total in Gators history), and was a key member of the Gators defense that contributed to the Gators' first-place SEC finishes in 1984 and 1985. In four years as a Gator, he had ten career interceptions, and led the team in tackles and punt returns as a senior.[12] The Miami Dolphins picked Williams in the second round of the 1988 NFL Draft.[99]
John L. Williams Football 1982–85 Running back John L. Williams shared the Gators backfield with Neal Anderson, and the two formed a devastating running attack. In four years as a Gator, he compiled 2,409 yards rushing and 863 yards receiving, and received All-SEC and All-American honors.[12] A first-round draft pick of the Seattle Seahawks, Williams was a two-time Pro Bowl selection and played in Super Bowl XXX.[100]
Lawrence D. Wright, III Football 1993–96 Safety Lawrence Wright was a member of four consecutive SEC championships teams, and a key defensive player on the Gators' first-ever national championship team in 1996. Wright was a senior team captain, a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, an All-American, a CFA Scholar-Athlete, and the winner of Jim Thorpe Award recognizing him as the best defensive back in college football.[12]
Daniel C. Wuerffel Football 1993–96 Quarterback Danny Wuerffel was a member of four consecutive SEC championship teams, and led the Gators to their first-ever national championship in 1996. He was a first-team All-SEC selection, a consensus first-team All-American, the recipient of the Draddy Trophy, and the Heisman Trophy winner. In four seasons, Wuerffel completed 708 of 1,170 passes for 10,875 yards and 114 touchdown passes—the best in SEC history.[12]
James K. Yarbrough Football 1966–68 Six-foot-six, 260-pound Jim Yarbrough was a standout tight end and backup kicker for the Gators. He was drafted by the Detroit Lions in the second round of the 1969 NFL Draft, and played eight seasons for Lions.[101]
H. Jackson Youngblood Football 1968–70 Defensive lineman Jack Youngblood was a first-team All-SEC selection, a first-team All-American, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award.[12] The St. Louis Rams drafted him in the first round of the 1971 NFL Draft, and he received numerous All-Pro and Pro Bowl honors during his fourteen-year NFL career.[102] Youngblood is a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, College Football Hall of Fame, and Gator Ring of Honor.[12][103]

Men's golf[edit]

The following Gator Greats are former members of the Florida Gators men's golf team:

Name Sport Years Accomplishments
Thomas D. Aaron Golf 1956–59 Tommy Aaron was a member of the Gators' 1956 SEC championship team, and won the individual SEC championship in 1957 and 1958. He was a two-time All-American. He placed second in the U.S. Amateur in 1958, was a member of the 1959 U.S. Walker Cup team, and won the Western Amateur in 1960.[104] As a pro, Aaron won three PGA Tour events, and placed second in the 1972 PGA Championship.[105]
T. Andrew Bean Golf 1972–75 Andy Bean was a member of the 1973 Gators team that won the SEC and NCAA national championship tournaments. He was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, and a three-time All-American.[104] As a professional golfer, Bean won eleven PGA Tour events; he placed second in the 1980 and 1989 PGA Championships, and also in the 1982 British Open.[106]
Frank J. Beard Golf 1958–61 Frank Beard was recognized as an All-American in 1960 and 1961.[104] As a professional golfer, Beard won eleven PGA Tour events, and placed third in the U.S. Open in 1965 and 1975.
Christian D. DiMarco Golf 1987–90 As a Gator, Chris DiMarco shot a three-round score of 209 to win the SEC individual title in 1989, while leading the Gators to an SEC team championship. He was a seven-time collegiate medalist, a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, the SEC Player of the Year, and a three-time All-American.[104] As a pro, DiMarco has won three PGA Tour events; he has also placed second in the PGA Championship, The Masters, and the British Open.[107]
J. Brian Gay Golf 1991–94 During his four years as a Gator, the team won four consecutive SEC championships, and the 1993 NCAA national championship. Individually, he was the SEC Freshman of the Year, a five-time individual medalist, two-time SEC individual champion, three-time first-team All-SEC selection, and a two-time All-American.[104] As a professional golfer, Gay has won three PGA Tour events.[108]
Phillip R. Hancock Golf 1973–76 During Phil Hancock's freshman year, the Gators golf team won the 1973 NCAA Championship. Individually, Hancock received All-SEC honors for four consecutive years, and was a three-time All-American. He won the SEC individual championship in 1975 and 1976.[104] As a pro, he won three tournaments.
H. Dudley Hart Golf 1987–90 As a four-year Gator golfer, Dudley Hart was the SEC Freshman of the Year, a three-time first-team All-SEC selection, and a four-time All-American.[104] As a professional golfer, Hart has won two PGA Tour events, and placed sixth in the 1993 PGA Championship.[109]
Gary D. Koch Golf 1971–74 Gary Koch was a four-time first-team All-SEC selection, and a three-time All-American. He was also a member of the Gators teams that won two SEC championships, and the 1973 NCAA national championship. Individually, he was a two-time individual SEC tournament champion, and the runner-up at the 1973 NCAA tournament.[104] As a pro, Koch won four PGA Tour events; his best finish in a major was fourth at the 1988 British Open.[110]
Steven N. Melnyk Golf 1967–69 Steve Melnyk was a two-time All-American, and the number one golfer on the 1968 team that won the NCAA Division I Golf Championship—the first national championship, in any sport, in University of Florida history.[104] Melnyk won both the U.S. Amateur and the British Amateur; as a pro, he won four PGA Tour events.
Robert J. Murphy Golf 1964–66 Bob Murphy won the 1965 U.S. Amateur Championship and the 1966 individual NCAA championship, and was recognized as an All-American in 1966.[104] As a professional golfer, he won five PGA Tour events; he also placed second at the 1970 PGA Championship, and third at the 1975 U.S. Open.[111]
Andrew S. North Golf 1969–72 As a Gator golfer, Andy North was a three-time first-team All-SEC selection, and an All-American in 1970, 1971 and 1972.[104] As a member of the PGA Tour, North won the U.S. Open in 1978 and 1985.[112]
David W. Ragan, Jr. Golf 1954–56 Dave Ragan was a member of the Gators team that finished sixth in the NCAA national tournament in 1955, and won the first two SEC championships in team history in 1955 and 1956. As a senior in 1956, he won the SEC individual championship, and was recognized as an All-American.[104] As a professional golfer, Ragan won three PGA Tour events, and placed third at the 1963 PGA Championship.
G. Douglas Sanders Golf 1955 In 1955, Doug Sanders and the team won the SEC championship and earned a sixth-place finish at the NCAA championship tournament—the Gators' best national championship finish until that time.[104] He won the 1956 Canadian Open—the first amateur to do so. As a member of the PGA Tour, Sanders won twenty events; he placed second in the PGA Championship, the U.S. Open, and the British Open (twice).
Daniel D. Sikes Golf 1951–53 Dan Sikes was recognized as an All-American in 1952—the University of Florida's first All-American golfer.[104] As a member of the PGA Tour, he won six events; he also placed fifth at the 1965 Masters, and third at the 1967 PGA Championship.

Women's golf[edit]

The following Gator Greats are former members of the Florida Gators women's golf team:

Name Sport Years Accomplishments
Karen Davies Golf 1985–88 Karen Davies won the individual SEC championship in 1986, led the Lady Gators to back-to-back NCAA national championships in 1985 and 1986, and set the present team record for most collegiate individual tournament victories (9). She was the SEC Freshman of the Year, the SEC Player of the Year, a four-time first-team All-SEC selection, and a three-time first-team All-American.[113] Davies played on the LPGA Tour for fourteen years.
E. Page Dunlap-Halpin Golf 1984–87 Page Dunlap was a member of the Lady Gators' back-to-back NCAA national championship teams in 1985 and 1986. Dunlap was also the individual NCAA national champion in 1986, shooting a 72-hole score of 291 to win by a single stroke. She was a first-team All-American, and won the Broderick Award in 1986.[113] Dunlap is a member of the National Golf Coaches Association (NGCA) Players Hall of Fame.[114]
Riko Higashio Golf 1995–98 Riko Higashio was the SEC Freshman of the Year in 1996, a three-time first-team All-SEC selection, and a first-team All-American and the recipient of the Dinah Shore Trophy in 1998. She tied for the lowest 18-hole round in Lady Gators history (67). Higashio turned professional in 1998, and played on the Futures Tour, LPGA Tour and LPGA Tour of Japan.[113]
Donna Horton White Golf 1975–76 In her two years as a Lady Gator, Donna Horton was a four-time collegiate medalist. In 1976, she competed in the World Cup and the Curtis Cup, and won the U.S. Amateur.[113] She turned professional in 1977, and competed on the LPGA Tour for fifteen years, and won three LPGA tournaments. Horton is a member of the NGCA Players Hall of Fame.[114]
Cheryl Morley Pontious Golf 1985–88 Cheryl Morley was a member of the Lady Gators' NCAA national championship team in 1986, and won the individual SEC championship in 1988. She was a three-time first-team All-SEC selection, and a two-time first-team All-American.[113] Morley is a member of the NGCA Players Hall of Fame.[114]
Deb Richard Golf 1982–85 Deb Richard won seven collegiate tournaments, including three consecutive SEC individual championships. She was a four-time first-team All-SEC selection, and a two-time first-team All-American. She was the individual runner-up, by a single stroke, at the NCAA Women's Golf Championship, the SEC Golfer of the Year, and winner of the Broderick Award in 1985.[113] Richard is a member of the NGCA Players Hall of Fame.[114]

Women's gymnastics[edit]

The following Gator Greats are former members of the Florida Gators women's gymnastics team:

Name Sport Years Accomplishments
Kristin Guise Lee Gymnastics 1993–96 Kristin Guise received a total of eleven All-American honors, including six first-team honors. Guise finished first in the SEC Championship all-around competition in 1995, and was recognized as the SEC Gymnast of the Year in 1996.
Lynn McDonnell Keefe Gymnastics 1981–84 Lynn McDonnell received four All-American honors. McDonnell was a member of the Gators teams that won the AIAW national championship team in 1982, and three consecutive SEC championships in 1982, 1983 and 1984. She finished first in the SEC championship all-around competition in 1981 and 1982.
Melissa Miller Gymnastics 1986–89 Melissa Miller earned six All-American honors. Miller finished first in the SEC championship all-around competition in 1988 and 1989.
Elfi Schlegel-Dunn Gymnastics 1983–86 Elfi Schlegel received six All-American honors. She was a member of the Gators' SEC championship teams in 1983 and 1984. Schlegel turned in top-three performances in ten individual events at four SEC championship tournaments.
Chrissy Van Fleet Gymnastics 1997–2000 Chrissy Van Fleet earned five first-team All-American honors, and six more second-team honors. Van Fleet led the Gators to a second-place NCAA finish as a sophomore in 1998, earned sixteen all-around victories during her career, and was the SEC Gymnast of the Year in 2000.
Ann M. Woods-Smith Gymnastics 1980–82 Ann Woods earned five All-American honors. Woods was a member of the Gators' SEC championship and AIAW national championship team in 1982. Woods placed among the top three in five different individual events at the 1982 SEC championships.

Women's soccer[edit]

The following Gator Greats are former members of the Florida Gators women's soccer team:

Name Sport Years Accomplishments
Erin Baxter McCorkle Soccer 1995–98 Midfielder Erin Baxter was a senior member of the Gators' 1998 NCAA national championship team. Baxter was a three-time first-team All-SEC selection and a three-time All-American. She was named the Soccer America Most Valuable Player of the 1998 season.
Danielle Garrett Fotopoulos Soccer 1996–98 Forward Danielle Fotopoulos was a senior member of the Gators' 1998 NCAA national championship team. She was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection and a two-time All-American, and was named National Player of the Year by several organizations in 1998. Fotopoulos was a member of the U.S. national team that won the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup.
Heather Mitts Feeley Soccer 1996–99 Defender Heather Mitts was a key member of the Gators' first NCAA national championship team in 1998, and was recognized as a first-team All-American in 1999. Mitts won Olympic gold medals as a member of the winning U.S. teams in 2004, 2008 and 2012, and was a member of the U.S. national team for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup tournament.[115]
M. Abigail Wambach Soccer 1998–2001 Forward Abby Wambach was a member of the Gators' 1998 NCAA national championship team. She was a four-time first-team All-SEC selection, a two-time first-team All-American, and the Soccer America Most Valuable Player in 2001. Wambach won Olympic gold medals as a member of the winning U.S. teams in 2004 and 2012, and was a member of the U.S. national team for the 2003, 2007 and 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup tournaments.[116]
Sarah Yohe Cohen Soccer 1996–99 Sarah Yohe scored eighteen game-winning goals as a Gator. As a freshman, she kicked the winning goal in the Gators' first SEC championship. As a junior, she scored the team's only goal in the 1–0 victory over Santa Clara in the NCAA semifinals, sending the Gators to the 1998 NCAA championship. As a senior, she was SEC Player of the Year, a first-team All-SEC selection, a second-team All-American, and the national Scholar Athlete of the Year.[117]

Softball[edit]

The following Gator Great is a former member of the Florida Gators softball team:

Name Sport Years Accomplishments
Jennifer M. Gladding Softball 2003–04 Pitcher Jenny Gladding was a junior transfer to the University of Florida. In two seasons as one of the Gators' starting pitchers, she compiled 285 strikeouts, an earned run average of 1.20, one perfect game and one no-hitter. She was a first-team All-SEC selection in 2003.[2]
C. Chelsey Sakizzie Softball 1997–98 Chelsey Sakizzie transferred to the University of Florida as a junior. In just two seasons as the Gators' ace starting pitcher, she won sixty games, notched 557 strikeouts, and compiled an earned run average of only 1.14. In ninety-five appearances, she pitched seventy-one complete games, and threw twenty-seven shutouts. She was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, the SEC Player of the Year, and an All-American.

Men's swimming and diving[edit]

The following Gator Greats are former male members of the Florida Gators swimming and diving teams:

Name Sport Years Accomplishments
St. Elmo "Chic" Acosta Swimming 1939–40 Chic Acosta won the 1939 individual SEC championship in the 50-yard freestyle event.[118]
Craig R. Beardsley Swimming 1979–83 Craig Beardsley was a butterfly specialist who was a member of the 1980 U.S Olympic team and the favorite to win a gold medal, but was unable to compete because of the American-led boycott of the Moscow Olympics. He was an eight-time All-American, and won two individual NCAA championships in the 200-meter butterfly.[118] While he was a Gator, Beardsley held the world record in the 200-meter butterfly from 1980 to 1983.
James L. Borland Diving 1953–54 Diver Jim Borland was an All-American who won two individual SEC championships in the one-meter and three-meter springboard diving events, making a major contribution to the Gators' SEC team championship in 1954.[118]
Matthew J. Cetlinski Swimming 1983–86 Matt Cetlinksi earned eight All-American honors, and won five individual NCAA titles in distance swimming events, including the 500-meter freestyle (twice) and the 1,650-meter freestyle (three times).[118] Cetlinski won a gold medal as a member of the winning U.S. team in the 4x200-meter freestyle relay at the 1988 Olympics.[119]
Edmond "Tom" Dioguardi Swimming 1966–67 Tom Dioguardi was a freestyle specialist who received five All-American honors, and was an eight-time SEC individual champion—three times in the 50-yard freestyle, twice in the 100-yard freestyle, and three times in the 200-yard freestyle. Dioguardi was a major contributor to the Gators' SEC team championships in 1966 and 1967.[118]
Phillip A. Drake Swimming 1956–58 Phil Drake was a two-time All-American who won four individual SEC championships in 1957 and 1958, including the 100-yard butterfly, 200-yard butterfly (twice), and 200-yard individual medley. Drake was a major contributor to the Gators' SEC team championships in 1957 and 1958.[118]
Geoffrey S. Gaberino Swimming 1981–84 Geoff Gaberino received fourteen All-American honors and was the team captain when the Gators won back-to-back NCAA national team championships in 1983 and 1984. He swam the opening leg for the Gators' NCAA championship relay teams in the 4x100-meter and 4x200-meter freestyle relay events.[118] Gaberino won a gold medal at the 1984 Olympics as a member of the winning U.S. team in the 4x200-meter relay.[120]
Michael S. Heath Swimming 1983–86 Mike Heath earned nineteen All-American honors. He swam the anchor leg for the Gators' NCAA national championship relay teams in the 4x100-meter and 4x200-meter freestyle relay events in 1983 and 1984, and also won an individual NCAA title in the 200-meter freestyle.[118] Heath won three gold medals (4x100-meter freestyle, 4x200-meter freestyle, and 4x100-meter medley relays) and a silver (200-meter freestyle) at the 1984 Olympics.[121]
Rogers B.
"Tiger" Holmes
Swimming 1941–42,
1947
Tiger Holmes was the SEC champion in the 50-yard freestyle and a member of the Gators' SEC champion medley relay team in 1942. His college career was interrupted by his military service during World War II, but he returned to lead the team as captain after the war. A long-time financial supporter of Gators athletics, Holmes served as president of Gator Boosters, Inc.[122]
Patrick D. Kennedy Swimming 1983–84
1986
Pat Kennedy was a nine-time All-American. He was a major contributor to the Gators' 1983 and 1984 NCAA national team championships, placing third in two events in 1983 (200-meter backstroke, 400-meter individual medley), and second in two events in 1984 (200-meter and 400-meter individual medley).[118] Kennedy was a member of the 1984 U.S. Olympic team and placed eighth in the 200-meter butterfly.[123]
David E. Larson Swimming 1978–81 David Larson received twenty-one All-American honors, and was a member of the Gators' NCAA national championship relay teams in the 4x200-meter freestyle relay in 1979 and 1981.[118] Larson won a gold medal at the 1984 Olympics as a member of the winning U.S. team in the 4x200-meter relay.[124]
Gerald S. Livingston Swimming 1962–64 Jerry Livingston was a four-time All-American who dominated the butterfly in the SEC, winning three consecutive individual SEC titles in both the 100-yard and 200-yard butterfly events. He was a major contributor to the Gators' SEC team championships in 1962, 1963 and 1964.[118]
J. Stephen McBride Diving 1960–62 Diver Steve McBride was a two-time All-American who dominated diving in the SEC for three years, winning individual SEC championships in the one-meter and three-meter springboard diving events in 1960, 1961 and 1962. McBride was a major contributor to the Gators' SEC team championships in those same years.[118]
Mark A. McKee Swimming 1968–71 Mark McKee was a medley swimmer who received four All-American honors. He who won four individual SEC championships, including the 200-meter individual medley once, and the 400-meter individual medley three times. He was a major contributor to the Gators' SEC team championships in 1968 and 1970.[118]
A. Timothy McKee Swimming 1972–74 Tim McKee was a four-time All-American. He won six individual SEC championships, including the 200-meter backstroke (twice), 200-meter individual medley (twice), and 400-meter individual medley (twice).[118] McKee competed at the 1972 and 1976 Olympics, and won three silver medals—one in the 200-meter individual medley, and two in the 400-meter individual medley.[125]
Andrew M. McPherson Swimming 1967–69 Andy McPherson was a three-time All-American who won five individual SEC titles in three years, including the 100-yard freestyle (three times), the 50-yard freestyle, and the 200-yard individual medley. McPherson was a major contributor to the Gators' SEC team championships in 1967 and 1968.[118]
Alberto E. Mestre-Sosa Swimming 1983–86 Alberto Mestre earned seventeen All-American honors. He was a member of the Gators' NCAA national championship relay teams in the 4x100-meter and 4x200-meter freestyle relay events in 1983 and 1984, and also placed second in the 100-meter freestyle in 1984.[118] Mestre was a member of the Venezuelan Olympic team in 1980 and 1984, and placed sixth in the 100-meter freestyle and fifth in the 200-meter freestyle in 1984.[126]
Anthony C. Nesty Swimming 1989–92 Anthony Nesty received sixteen All-American honors. He won three consecutive individual NCAA championships in the 100-yard butterfly (1990–1992), one in the 200-yard butterfly (1990), and one as a member of the school's 400-yard medley relay team (1991).[118] Nesty won a gold medal in the 100-meter butterfly at the 1988 Olympics, and a bronze medal in the same event at the 1992 Olympics.[127]
James Ray Perkins Swimming 1968–71 Four-time All-American Jimmy Perkins was a breaststroke specialist who won an individual SEC title in the 200-yard breaststroke event in 1970, contributing to the Gators' 1970 SEC team championship.[118]
Edwin C. Reese Swimming 1961–63 Eddie Reese won seven individual SEC titles, including the 200-yard butterfly, 200-yard breaststroke (twice), 200-yard individual medley (three times), and 400-yard individual medley. He was a major contributor as the Gators swept three straight SEC team championships.[118] Reese is the current head coach of the University of Texas swim team, and his Longhorn swimmers have won ten NCAA national team championships.
Charles T.
"Ted" Robinson
Swimming 1953–54 All-American Ted Robinson won three individual SEC titles in breaststroke events, including the 100-yard breaststroke in 1953, and the 200-yard breaststroke in 1953 and 1954. Robinson was a major contributor to the Gators' back-to-back SEC team championships in 1953 and 1954.[118]
Barry R. Russo Swimming 1966–68 Barry Russo was a two-time All-American in the breaststroke who won two individual SEC titles in the 200-yard breaststroke and a third SEC team title as a member of the Gators' 4x200-yard freestyle relay team. Russo was a key contributor to the Gators' back-to-back SEC team championships in 1966, 1967 and 1968.[118]
Christopher Snode Diving 1977–80 Chris Snode received six All-American honors and was the first Gators men's national diving champion, winning the NCAA national championship in the three-meter springboard event in 1978.[118] Snode was a member of the British Olympic team in 1976, 1980 and 1984; he placed among the top ten divers in the world in both platform and springboard diving at the 1980 and 1984 Olympics, and won the first FINA World Cup in the three-meter in 1979.[128]
Blanchard E. Tual Swimming 1965–67 Blanchard Tual dominated the backstroke events at the SEC championships for three consecutive years, sweeping the 100-meter and 200-meter backstroke in 1965, 1966 and 1967, and making major contributions to the Gators' three straight SEC team championships during those same years.[118]
E. Craig White Diving
Swimming
1954–56 Craig White was a rare All-American athlete who won individual SEC championships in both swimming and diving events. White swept the one-meter and three-meter springboard diving events, while also swimming a leg for the Gators' winning team in the 400-yard freestyle relay, and making a major contribution to the Gators' 1954 SEC team championship.[118]
Bruce L. Williams Swimming 1968–71 Bruce Williams was a five-time All-American who won a total of five individual SEC championships in 1968 and 1969, including the 100-yard butterfly, 200-yard freestyle (twice), 500-yard freestyle, and 1,650-yard freestyle. Williams was a major contributor to the Gators' SEC team championship in 1968.[118]
David Lopez-Zubero Swimming 1978–81 David Zubero was a member of the Gators' relay teams that won the NCAA national championship in the 4x200-yard freestyle relay while setting a new American record in 1979, and again when the Gators won the NCAA championship in same event in 1981. He received fourteen All-American honors.[118] Zubero won a bronze medal in the 200-meter butterfly at the 1980 Olympics.[129]
Martin López-Zubero Swimming 1988–91 While swimming for the Gators, Martin Zubero won four individual NCAA national championships—the 200-meter individual medley, the 400-meter medley relay, and twice in the 200-meter backstroke—received fifteen All-American honors, and was recognized as the 1991 NCAA Male Swimmer of the Year.[118] Zubero won the gold medal in the 200-meter backstroke at the 1992 Olympics.[130]

Women's swimming and diving[edit]

The following Gator Greats are former female members of the Florida Gators swimming and diving teams:

Name Sport Years Accomplishments
Tami L. Bruce Swimming 1986–89 Tami Bruce earned thirteen All-American honors as a Gator swimmer, and won six individual NCAA national titles and one NCAA national relay title as a member of a Gators relay team.[118] Bruce was a member of the 1988 U.S. Olympic team and placed fourth in the 400-meter freestyle and fifth in the 800-meter freestyle events.[131]
Amy L. Caulkins Swimming 1980–83 Amy Caulkins received twenty-two All-American honors in four years of college swimming. She also won one individual NCAA national title in the 100-meter freestyle event, another NCAA national title as a member of the Gators winning 200-meter medley relay team, and was a key contributor to the Gators' 1982 NCAA national team championship.[118]
Tracy Caulkins Stockwell Swimming 1982–84 In three years a Gator swimmer, Tracy Caulkins earned twenty-one All-American honors—the maximum number possible three years. She won sixteen NCAA national titles, including an unprecedented twelve individual NCAA titles, and four more NCAA titles as a member of the Gators relay teams.[118] Unable to compete in the 1980 Moscow Olympics because of the American-led boycott, Caulkins won three Olympic gold medals in 1984.[132]
Julie Gorman Swimming 1987–90 Julie Gorman received thirteen All-American honors during her four years as a college swimmer. She won four individual NCAA national titles, including the 100-meter individual medley, the 200-meter individual medley, and the 100-meter butterfly twice; she won two more NCAA national titles as a member of the Gators' winning relay teams in the 400-meter medley relay.[118]
Nicole L. Haislett Swimming 1991–94 Nicole Haislett was able to swim every stroke well, and received twenty-eight All-American honors in her four years as a Gator swimmer—the maximum number possible. She won six individual NCAA national titles, and two NCAA titles as a member of Gators relay teams.[118] Haislett also won three world championship titles in 1991, and three Olympic gold medals in 1992.[133]
Susan E. Halfacre Swimming 1973–76 Susan Halfacre received three All-American honors. Remarkably, she served as the head coach of the Gators women's team while competing as an athlete for three years. Under her guidance, the Gators finished eighth, eighth and nineteenth in three AIAW national team championships. Halfacre won an individual AIAW national title in the 400-meter freestyle, and two more AIAW national titles as a member of Gators relay teams.[118]
Renee A. Laravie-Kelly Swimming 1977–79 Rene Laravie received ten All-American honors during her three-year college swimming career. She won three individual AIAW national titles, including the 100-meter breaststroke, 100-meter and 200-meter individual medley events, and two more AIAW national titles as a member of the Gators' winning relay teams in the 800-meter freestyle relay. Laravie was a key contributor to the Gators' 1979 AIAW national team championship.[118]
Mimosa L. McNerney Swimming 1993–96 Mimosa McNerney was a long-distance freestyle specialist. During her four years as a Gator swimmer, she earned seven All-American honors, and won four individual NCAA national championships—three times in the 1,650-meter freestyle, and once in the 500-meter freestyle.[118]
Megan Neyer Diving 1982–84,
1986
Diver Megan Neyer was a favorite to win a gold medal as a member of the 1980 U.S Olympic team, but was unable to compete because of the American-led boycott of the Moscow Olympics. As a Gator, she received eight All-American honors–the maximum number possible for a college diver. Neyer also won eight individual NCAA national titles, sweeping the one-meter and three-meter springboard events all four years she competed.[118]
Dara G. Torres Swimming 1986–89 Demonstrating her versatility, Dara Torres earned twenty-eight All-American honors in four years as a college swimmer—the maximum number possible. She won three individual NCAA national titles and was a member of five Gators relay teams that won NCAA national championships.[118] Torres is a twelve-time Olympic medalist, most recently winning three silver medals in the 2008 Olympics as a 41-year-old.[134]
Kathleen Treible Slaton Swimming 1981–84 In four years as a Gator swimmer, Kathy Treible received twenty-eight All-American honors—the maximum number an individual college swimmer can earn. She was a key member of the 1982 Gators women's team that won the NCAA national team championship, winning three individual NCAA national titles in breaststroke events in 1982, for a total of six individual NCAA titles and five NCAA relay team titles during her career.[118]
Mary Wayte Bradburne Swimming 1984–87 Mary Wayte earned twenty-six All-American honors during her four years as a Gator swimmer. She won eight NCAA national titles, two in individual events, and six more as a member of Gators relay teams.[118] In two different Olympics, Wayte won four Olympic medals, including two golds, a silver and a bronze.[135]

Men's tennis[edit]

The following Gator Greats are former members of the Florida Gators men's tennis team:

Name Sport Years Accomplishments
Harold C. "Chap" Brown Tennis 1975–78 Chap Brown was a four-time All-SEC selection.
Mark B. Merklein Tennis 1991–94 Mark Merklein was a four-time All-SEC selection and a four-time All-American. He and partner David Blair won the NCAA national doubles championship in 1993. Merklein won the NCAA national singles championship in 1994. During the 1994 NCAA tennis tournament, he dominated the competition, losing only one set.
Jeffrey A. Morrison Tennis 1998–2000 Jeff Morrison was a three-time All-SEC selection and a four-time All-American. Morrison won the NCAA national singles championship in 1999, losing only one set of thirteen played against six NCAA tournament opponents.
Armistead C. Neely Tennis 1967–69 Armistead Neely was a three-time All-SEC selection and two-time All-American. Neely won SEC singles championships in 1967 and 1969, and SEC doubles championships in 1968 and 1969. Neely later served as the Atlanta WCT Peachtree Grand Prix event director, the circuit coordinator for the USTA, and head coach of the Alabama Crimson Tide men's tennis team.
Justin M. O'Neal Tennis 1997–2000 Justin O'Neal was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, and a three-time All-American. O'Neal holds the Gators record for career singles victories.
James G. Pressly, Jr. Tennis 1967–69 Jamie Pressly complied a 60–3 singles record in three years, and was an SEC doubles champion and three-time SEC singles champion. Pressly was a three-time All-SEC selection and a 1969 All-American.
James A. Shaffer Tennis 1961–62,
1964
Jim Shaffer was a two-time SEC singles champion (1961, 1962), and received All-American honors in 1961 after advancing to the NCAA singles championship quarterfinals.
William A. Tym Tennis 1961,
1963–64
Bill Tym was a two-time SEC singles champion, and a 1963 All-American. Tym later served as the head coach of the Vanderbilt Commodores men's tennis team, and also as the president and executive director of the United States Tennis Association (USTA).

Women's tennis[edit]

The following Gator Greats are former members of the Florida Gators women's tennis team:

Name Sport Years Accomplishments
Judy Acker-Smith Tennis 1975–78 Judy Acker was named to the first-ever All-America women's tennis team in 1976. Acker and her doubles partner, sister Sherry Acker, finished third in the AIAW national championship tournament, leading the Lady Gators to a fifth-place finish in the AIAW national team championships in 1977. Again led by Acker, the team finished fourth in the 1978 AIAW national championship tournament.
Jillian Alexander Brower Tennis 1989–91 Jillian Alexander received three All-American honors. Alexander and her partner Nicole Arendt won the 1991 NCAA doubles national championship, winning twelve of thirteen sets played in the six rounds of the NCAA tournament.
Nicole J. Arendt Tennis 1988–91 Nicole Arendt was a six-time first-team All-SEC selection, and earned eight All-American honors—four each in singles and doubles. She and her partner Jillian Alexander won the 1991 NCAA doubles national championship, losing only one tournament set of thirteen played. Arendt also was the singles runner-up at the 1990 NCAA national tournament. As a pro, she won sixteen doubles tournaments.
Dawn A. Buth Tennis 1995–98 Dawn Buth received seven All-American honors: four in doubles and three in singles. Buth and partner Stephanie Nickitas won the 1996 and 1997 NCAA doubles national championships, and lost in the final of the 1998 NCAA championship. She was also a member of the Gators' NCAA national championship teams in 1996 and 1998.
Jill N. Craybas Tennis 1995–96 Jill Craybas was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection and a two-time All-American. She won the 1996 NCAA singles tennis national championship, winning twelve of thirteen sets that she played in the tournament. Craybas was also a member of the Gators' NCAA national championship team in 1996. As a touring pro, she has won five singles events.
Cissie Donigan Tennis 1979–82 Cissie Donigan was a first-team All-SEC selection and an All-American. Donigan won two SEC singles championships, once as the team's No. 5 player, and once as the No. 1. She also won two SEC doubles championships, both times with partner Ilene Friedland.
Andrea M. Farley Tennis 1990–93 Andrea Farley was a three-time first-team All-SEC selection, and a three-time All-American. Farley was a member of the Gators' 1992 NCAA national championship team.
Jill Hetherington Hultquist Tennis 1984–87 Jill Hetherington was a four-time first-team All-SEC selection and received four All-American honors. She won four straight SEC singles championships, three as the team's No. 2 singles player, and once at No. 1; she also won three consecutive SEC doubles championships. Hetherington won fourteen events as a pro, and is currently the head coach of the Washington Huskies women's tennis team.
Stephanie I. Nickitas Tennis 1996–99 Stephanie Nickitas was a six-time All-American: twice in singles and four times in doubles. With partner Dawn Buth, she won the NCAA doubles national championships in 1996 and 1997, and played for a third NCAA doubles title in 1998 before losing in the final. Nickitas was also a member of the Gators' NCAA national championship teams in 1996 and 1998.
Lisa Raymond Tennis 1992–93 In two years as a Lady Gator tennis player, Lisa Raymond was a three-time first-team All-SEC selection, and earned All-American honors in 1992 and 1993, after winning the 1992 and 1993 NCAA singles national championships. She was also a member of the Gators' 1992 NCAA national championship team. As a pro, she has won nine Grand Slam doubles events, most recently the 2011 Wimbledon doubles championship.[136]
Shaun Stafford-Beckish Tennis 1987–88 Shaun Stafford was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection and an All-American in 1987 and 1988. She advanced to the final of the 1987 NCAA singles national championship before losing. She returned to the final in 1988 and won the NCAA singles national championship, after sweeping six tournament opponents in twelve straight sets.
Alice Luthy Tym Tennis 1961–64 Alice Luthy became the de facto founder of the Florida Gators women's tennis team when she organized the University of Florida intercollegiate women's tennis club team in 1961. She later married Gator All-American Bill Tym, and became a touring professional tennis player. As a college tennis coach, she led the Chattanooga Lady Mocs to two AIAW small-college national championships.

Men's track and field[edit]

The following Gator Greats are former male members of the Florida Gators track and field teams:

Name Sport Years Accomplishments
Keith A. Brantly Track & field 1982–84 Distance runner Keith Brantly received All-American honors in the indoor two-mile run and twice in the 10,000-meter run. He won the SEC outdoor championships in the 10,000 meters in 1982 and 1983. Brantly was a member of the 1996 U.S. Olympic team, and finished twenty-eighth in the world in the Olympic marathon run.[137]
Beaufort A. Brown Track & field 1973–75 Sprinter Beaufort Brown won the SEC and NCAA indoor national championships in the 600-yard run in 1973. Brown was an All-American as a member of the Gators 4x440-yard relay teams that won the NCAA indoor championship in 1975, and three SEC indoor championships and one outdoor championship in the same event.
R. Michael Cotton Track & field 1971–73 Pole-vaulter Mike Cotton earned All-American honors with a vault of seventeen feet in 1973. He won three SEC championships in the pole vault—one indoor and two outdoor.
Scott Dykehouse Track & field 1977 In 1977, javelin thrower Scott Dykehouse received All-American honors for his NCAA national championship throw of 258 feet, five inches, and also won the SEC outdoor championship in the same event.
D. Mark Everett Track & field 1987–90 Middle distance runner Mark Everett was a member of the Gators' relay team that won the NCAA indoor national championship in the 4x400-meters in 1988, four consecutive SEC outdoor championships and three of four SEC indoor championships in the same event. Everett also won both the NCAA indoor and outdoor national championships in the 800-meter run in 1990, and four consecutive SEC outdoor championships in the 800 meters.
William A. Freeman Track & field 1974–76 Pole vaulter Will Freeman won three SEC indoor championships and two SEC outdoor championships in his event. He earned All-American honors with a vault of seventeen feet in 1976, and was a member of the first Gators team to win an SEC indoor track championship in 1975. He has been the head coach of the Grinnell College track team since 1980.[138]
Ellis B. Goodloe Track & field 1957–59 Sprinter Ellis Goodloe won an SEC indoor championship in the 60-yard dash, and SEC outdoor championships in the 100-yard dash and three times as a member of the Gators' 4x110-yard relay team.
J. Lewis "Papa" Hall, Jr. Football
Track & field
1950–52
1951–53
Papa Hall was a two-sport Gator standout in football and track and field. As a member of the Gators track and field team, Hall won the individual NCAA national championship in the high jump in 1951 and again in 1953, as well as the 1953 SEC championship in the same event. He was recognized as an All-American in 1951 and 1953.
Michael M. Holloway Track & field 1988–90, 1992 Mike Holloway won four SEC outdoor championships in the pole vault in 1988, 1989, 1990 and 1992, and one SEC indoor championship in 1992. Holloway earned three All-American honors with vaults over eighteen feet.
Ronald L. Jourdan Track & field 1968–70 High jumper Ron Jourdan was a two-time All-American, and won the NCAA indoor national championship in the high jump in 1969. He won four consecutive SEC indoor and outdoor championships in the high jump in 1969 and 1970. Jourdan was a member of the 1972 U.S. Olympic team, and was the first Gators track and field athlete to participate in the Olympic Games.[139]
Jack D. McGriff Track & field 1940–41
1946–47
Sprinter Jack McGriff was a standout 100-yard dash specialist whose undergraduate career was interrupted by World War II. After serving as a first lieutenant in the U.S. Army air forces, he returned to Gainesville and was elected team captain by his teammates in 1946. He later served as a member of the Florida Board of Regents.
Dennis A. Mitchell Track & field 1985, 1987–89 All-American sprinter Dennis Mitchell won the NCAA indoor national championship in the 200 meters in 1988, and the NCAA outdoor national championship in the same event in 1989. He was also a member of the Gators' indoor national championship relay team in the 4x400-meters in 1988. Mitchell won an Olympic gold medal as a member of the winning U.S. team in the 4x100-meters relay in 1992, and a silver in the same event in 1996.[140]
John Morton Track & field 1967–69 With consecutive throws of 181 feet, discus thrower John Morton earned All-American honors in 1967 and 1968. Morton won one SEC indoor championship in the shot put, and SEC outdoor championships in the shot put twice and the discus three times.
R. Earl Poucher Track & field 1953–56 Pole vaulter Earl Poucher was an All-American and the NCAA outdoor national champion in his event in 1954. Poucher also won four straight SEC outdoor championships in the pole vault.
James Pringle Track & field 1978–80 High jumper Jim Pringle was a two-time All-American who won the NCAA indoor national championship in his event in 1979, and SEC indoor championships in 1979 and 1980.
W. Henry Wadsworth Track & field 1960 Pole vaulter Henry Wadsworth earned All-American honors and was the NCAA national runner-up in 1960. Wadsworth also won SEC outdoor championships in the pole vault and high jump that same year.
William J.
"Bumper" Watson
Track & field 1954–55, 1958 Bumper Watson was an All-American in the 100-yard dash in 1955 with his NCAA national runner-up time of 9.7 seconds. Watson won the SEC outdoor championship in the 220-yard dash in 1955, and was a member of the Gators' SEC-winning relay team in the 4x110-yard event in 1954, 1955 and 1958.

Women's track and field[edit]

The following Gator Greats are former female members of the Florida Gators track and field teams:

Name Sport Years Accomplishments
Hazel M. Clark-Riley Track & field 1996–99 Middle distance runner Hazel Clark received twelve All-American honors, and was a three-time NCAA national champion in the 800-meter run (twice indoors, once outdoors). She also won four SEC indoor and two outdoor championships in the 800 meters, one in the 1,500 meters, and was also a member of four different SEC championship relay teams. Clark finished seventh in the world in the 800 meters at the 2000 Olympics.[141]
Michelle Freeman Track & field 1991–92 Michelle Freeman was a member of the Gators' relay that won the NCAA indoor and outdoor national championships in the 4x400-meters, won an individual NCAA outdoor national championships in the 100-meter hurdles, and received eight All-American honors. Freeman finished sixth in the world in the 100-meter hurdles and won a bronze medal as a member of Jamaica's team in the 4x100-meter relay at the 1996 Olympics.[142]
Heidi Hertz Sweet Track & field 1976 Heidi Hertz won the 1976 NCAA indoor national championship in the pentathlon with a total of 3,805 points. She was the first Gators women's track and field athlete who won an individual NCAA national championship.
Anita Howard Track & field 1990–91 Sprinter Anita Howard received seventeen All-American honors. She was a member of the Gators' relay teams that won the NCAA indoor nation championship in the 4x400-meter event in 1990, and the NCAA indoor and outdoor national championships in the same event in 1992. Howard also won an individual NCAA outdoor championship in the 400-meter run in 1992.
Leah Kirklin Anderson Track & field 1990–92 Six-time All-American Leah Kirklin won three NCAA national championships in the triple jump (two indoors, one outdoors). She was also a four-time SEC champion in the triple jump (twice indoors, twice outdoors).
Rochelle Steely Cross country
Track & field
1982–84
1983–85
Shelly Steely earned two All-American honors in cross country and three in track. In addition to SEC indoor championships in the distance medley relay in 1984 and the two-mile run in 1985, Steely dominated the outdoor distance events in 1984 and 1985, winning two SEC championships in the 3,000 meters, two in the 5,000 meters, and one in the 10,000 meters. She finished seventh in the world in the 3,000 meters at the 1992 Olympics.[143]
Colleen Rosensteel Track & field 1986–89 Colleen Rosensteel was a six-time All-American in track and field. She dominated the SEC throwing events during the 1988 and 1989 indoor and outdoor seasons, winning six SEC individual championship—four times in the shot put and twice in the discus. After college, she competed in judo at the 1992, 1996 and 2000 Olympics, reaching the semifinals in 2000.[144]

Women's volleyball[edit]

The following Gator Greats are former members of the Florida Gators volleyball team:

Name Sport Years Accomplishments
Áurea Cruz Volleyball 2000–03 Aury Cruz was a three-time first-team All-American, a three-time first-team All-SEC selection, and three-time SEC Player of the Year. Cruz holds the Gators career records for kills (1,855) and points (2,188.5), and led the Gators to four consecutive SEC championships and an appearance in the NCAA championship final in 2003. She was also a member of the Puerto Rican national team.
Aycan Gokberk Volleyball 1992–95 Aycan Gokberk was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, a three-time first-team All-American, and a two-time Academic All-American. She was the SEC Player of the Year in 1993 and 1995. During her four years as a Gator, she had 1,721 career kills, the team won four consecutive SEC championships, and made NCAA Final Four appearances in 1992 and 1993.
Jenny Manz Theis Volleyball 1996–99 Rightside hitter Jenny Manz was a three-time first-team All-SEC selection and a two-time All-American. She was the SEC Player of the Year in 1998 and 1999. During her four-season career as a Gator, Manz had 152 service aces, the team won four consecutive SEC championships and made NCAA Final Four appearances in 1996, 1997 and 1998.
Gudula Staub Volleyball 1991–92 Gudula Staub was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection and a two-time first-team All-American. She was the SEC Player of the Year in 1992. She averaged 5.36 points per set, third on the Gators' career records list. During Staub's two-year college career, the Gators won two consecutive SEC championships, and appeared in the NCAA Final Four in 1992. She also represented Germany in women's beach volleyball at the 2000 Olympics.[145]

Wrestling[edit]

The following Gator Greats are former members of the Florida Gators wrestling team:

Name Sport Years Accomplishments
Jeff Davis Wrestling 1972–75 Jeff Davis was a four-time All-SEC selection and the captain of the Gators' undefeated 1975 SEC championship team. Davis later served as an assistant wrestling coach for the Gators from 1975 to 1979. He was inducted into the National Wrestling Hall of Fame in 2004.[1]

Distinguished Letterwinners[edit]

The following list of Distinguished Letterwinners includes former Florida Gators athletes who have achieved distinction in their careers after college; among them are notable head coaches, political officeholders, business executives, and educators.

Name Sport Years Accomplishments
Jerry "Red" Anderson Football 1964–66 Red Anderson played football while he was a University of Florida undergraduate, and was the senior team captain of the Florida Gators basketball team in 1937. Anderson later became a college football coach, and served as a long-time assistant for four different programs, including fourteen seasons for the Gators. He was also the interim head of the Central Florida Knights in 1984.
Floyd T. Christian Football
Basketball
1934–36
1935–37
Floyd Christian played football and basketball while he was a University of Florida undergraduate, and was the senior team captain of the Florida Gators basketball team in 1937. Christian was a highly decorated World War II veteran who was later elected Commissioner of Education for the State of Florida.
Douglas A. Dickey Football
Baseball
1951–53
1952–53
Doug Dickey was the Gators' starting quarterback in 1952 and 1953, and led the team to its first-ever NCAA-sanctioned bowl game in 1952. He later became the head football coach of the Tennessee Volunteers and the Florida Gators, winning two SEC championships with Tennessee. After retiring from coaching, he served as the Tennessee Volunteers athletic director, and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach.[146]
Jimmy Dunn Football 1956–58 Jimmy Dunn was a three-year starter at quarterback and free safety, became the first quarterback to lead the Gators to three consecutive victories over the Georgia Bulldogs, and received the Fergie Ferguson Award in 1958. He later became the offensive coordinator for the Tennessee Volunteers and the Gators under head coach Doug Dickey.
William E. Harlan Swimming 1963–76 Bill Harlan was a strong Gator swimmer in the late 1940s, and became an instructor in the physical education department. He later served as the head coach of the Florida Gators men's swimming and diving team for thirteen years, during which his swimmers won eight SEC team championships and compiled a dual meet record of 109–25.
C. Kimberlin Helton Football 1967–69 Kim Helton was the starting center for the Gators football team from 1967 to 1969. Helton later became the offensive coordinator for the Miami Hurricanes during their first national championship season, the offensive line coach for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Houston Oilers and Los Angeles Raiders of the NFL, and the head coach of the Houston Cougars football team.
Gelindo Infante Football 1960–62 Lindy Infante was a running back for the Florida Gators football team from 1960 to 1962. He later became the head coach of the Jacksonville Bulls of the USFL, and the Green Bay Packers and the Indianapolis Colts of the NFL.
Jack Katz Football 1962–64 Jack Katz was a two-way offensive and defensive lineman for the Florida Gators football team. Katz later became the founder, president and chief executive officer of the Panama Jack Company.
Tommy R. Kelley Football 1960–62 Tom Kelley was a two-way offensive and defensive lineman for the Florida Gators football team. He was chosen to the 1960 All-SEC Sophomore team. Kelley became a well-known civil engineering consultant in the greater Orlando, Florida area, a long-time Gators booster, and a president of the F Club.[147]
Julian B. Lane Football 1934–36 Julian Lane was a two-way offensive and defensive lineman, and the senior team captain of the Florida Gators football team in 1936. Lane was later elected Mayor of Tampa, and afterward, as a member of the Florida House of Representatives and the Florida Senate.
William J.
"Red" Mitchum
Football 1948–51 Lineman Red Mitchum was a Gators football letterman in 1950 and 1951, and the first student to serve as master of ceremonies at the university's homecoming pep rally, Gator Growl.[148] As a graduate, he became a roving ambassador and successful fundraiser for the Florida Gators sports program, and a well-known speaker at Gators alumni events remembered for his humorous anecdotes of Gators football in the 1940s and 1950s.[149]
R. Larry Morris Football 1970–72 Larry Morris was a Gators football letterman in 1970 and 1972. He later served as a graduate assistant football coach in 1973, and became a prominent trial attorney and financial supporter of the Florida Gators sports program.[1]
Stephen C. O'Connell Boxing 1935–38 Steve O'Connell won the SEC middleweight championship as a member the Florida Gators boxing team. O'Connell served as an associate and chief justice of the Florida Supreme Court, and later became the first alumnus to serve as the president of the University of Florida.
Frederick S. Ridley Golf 1973 Fred Ridley was a member of the Florida Gators men's golf team in the 1970s. He won the U.S. Amateur Championship in 1975, and was elected president of the U.S. Golf Association in 2004.
William A. Shands Football 1908 Bill Shands played for the Florida football team before it was known as the "Gators," and was one of its stars in the early 1900s. He became an attorney and was elected to the Florida Senate; his fellow state senators later selected him as the senate president. Shands is remembered as the legislative driving force behind the founding of the University of Florida medical school and teaching hospital—now known as Shands Hospital.
George A. Smathers Basketball 1934–36 George Smathers was a standout member of the Florida Gators men's's basketball team from 1934 to 1936 and was its captain as a senior. Smathers was later elected to the U.S. House of Representative (1947–1951) and the U.S. Senate (1951–1969) from the state of Florida.
Dennis K.
"Dutch" Stanley
Football
Track & field
1926–28
1927–29
Dutch Stanley was a two-way end on the great Florida Gators football teams of 1927 and 1928. He later returned to his alma mater as the Gators head football coach from 1933 to 1935. He was also the head coach of the Gators tennis team and track and field team, and later served as the founding dean of the university's College of Health and Human Performance for over thirty years.
Larry L. Travis Football 1960–62 Larry Travis was an All-SEC two-way offensive and defensive lineman for the Florida Gators football team. After graduation, he was an assistant football coach for five Division I football programs, including Florida, and became the associate athletic director for the U.S. Naval Academy and Georgia Tech, then the athletic director for Kansas State and Western Carolina. Travis is currently the mayor of High Springs, Florida.[150]
Keith R. Tribble Football 1974–76 Keith Tribble was an offensive lineman for the Florida Gators football team in the mid-1970s. Tribble became the chief executive officer of the Orange Bowl organizing committee, and later became the athletic director of the University of Central Florida Knights sports program.[151]
Harrison M. Wilder Swimming 1961–63 Harry Wilder was a key contributor to the Gators' three consecutive SEC swimming and diving championships in 1961, 1962 and 1963, as a member of five conference champion relay teams. Wilder later became the owner of a successful group of McDonald's franchises, a long-time member of the board of directors of Gators Boosters, Inc., and a major financial supporter of the Florida Gators swimming and diving teams.[2]

Honorary Letterwinners[edit]

The following list of Honorary Letterwinners includes former coaches whose Florida Gators teams won national championships, one who later became the Chief Justice of the Florida Supreme Court, another who later served as the U.S. Army four-star general commanding United Nations armed forces during the Korean War, and the university medical researcher who formulated the sports drink Gatorade.

Name Role Years Accomplishments
Ruth Alexander Administrator 1972–81 Ruth Alexander was the driving force behind the founding of the Florida Gators women's sports program. As a physical education professor and associate athletic director, she assumed responsibility for the rapid expansion of the Florida Gators women's sports program during the 1970s. Alexander was also a key person in the organization of the AIAW, the governing body for women's college sports until 1983.[152]
Charles W. Bachman, Jr. Football 1928–32 Charlie Bachman was the head coach of the 1928 Florida Gators football team that produced a new national scoring record and the best win-loss record in the first eighty-nine years of Gators football.[12] Bachman was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1978.[153]
Percy M. Beard Track & field 1937–64 Percy Beard was an Olympic silver medalist in the 120-meter hurdles in the 1932 Olympics. He became the head coach of the Floria Gators track and field team in 1937 and let the team for twenty-eight seasons, including two SEC team championships. Drawing on his Auburn civil engineering education, Beard developed the first all-weather track in 1959. He is the namesake of the university's track and field facility.[154]
B. E. "Buster" Bishop Men's golf 1964–78 Buster Bishop was the head coach of the Florida Gators men's golf team for fifteen years. During his tenure, the Gators men's golfers won four SEC team championships and two NCAA national team championships—including the 1968 NCAA national team championship—the first national team championship, in any sport, in Florida Gators history.[155]
Andy Brandi Women's tennis 1984–2001 Andy Brandi was the head coach of the Florida Gators women's tennis team for seventeen years. During his tenure, the Lady Gators won fourteen SEC team championships, and three NCAA national team championships, in addition to finishing as the national runners-up in five other NCAA tournaments. Brandi was recognized as the national coach of the year five times.[156]
J. Robert Cade Sports medicine 1961–2004 Robert Cade was a professor of nephrology at the University of Florida College of Medicine. During the 1960s, he and his research team conducted experiments with Florida Gators football players regarding water and electrolyte loss during athletic competition. His team's experiments in rehydration and electrolyte replacement led to the formulation of the sports drink Gatorade.[157]
Norman G. Carlson Sports Information Director 1963–2011 Norm Carlson is a University of Florida alumnus and former sports journalist who was the sports information director of the Florida Gators sports program from 1963 to 2002. Since then, Carlson has served as an assistant athletic director and the historian of the program.[158]
Jimmy Carnes Track & field 1965–76 Jimmy Carnes was the head coach of the Florida Gators track and field team, with 93–3 record in dual meets. Carnes was also the founder of the Florida Track Club, founder of the Sunshine State Games, head coach of the 1980 U.S. Olympic team, and the first president of USA Track & Field.[159]
George Edmondson Football mascot 1949–2008 George Edmondson, more commonly known as Mr. Two Bits," served as an unofficial mascot and cheerleader at Florida Gators football games played at Florida Field for almost sixty years. Edmondson began to lead the home crowd in the "Two Bits" cheer during the darkest days of Gators football in the late 1940s, through eight SEC titles and three national championships.
Eugene Ellenson Football,
Administrator
1960–69 Gene Ellenson was an assistant coach and the defensive coordinator of the Florida Gators football team from 1960 to 1969. He was revered by his players for his pregame motivational speeches. Ellenson later served as an associate athletic director and the head of Gator Boosters, Inc.[160]
Dave Fuller Baseball 1947–76 Dave Fuller was the head coach of the Florida Gators baseball team for thirty years, and the longest serving coach in the history of the Florida Gators intercollegiate sports program. His 557 wins as the Gators baseball coach are more than any other coach, in any sport, in Gators history.
Frank Genovar Swimming
Tennis
1930–51
1941
Frank Genovar was the first head coach of the Florida Gators swimming and diving team, and served in that role for twenty-two years. During his tenure, the Gators won five SEC team swimming championships. He also coached the Florida Gators men's tennis team in 1941.
S. Ray Graves Football,
Athletic Director
1960–69
1960–79
Ray Graves was the head coach of the Florida Gators football team from 1960 to 1969. He coached the Gators to their first two major bowl appearances, compiled a 4–1 record in bowl games, and an overall win-loss record of 70–31–4. His seventy wins made him the winningest coach in the first sixty-five years of Gators football.[12] Graves was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1990.[161]
Ben Hill Griffin, Jr. Financial contributor Ben Hill Griffin, Jr. was a University of Florida alumnus and namesake of the university's football facility, Ben Hill Griffin Stadium. Griffin made his family fortune in citrus, cattle, and land development, and was a strong financial supporter of Florida Gators sports.
Ben Hill Griffin, III Financial contributor Ben Hill Griffin, Jr. was a University of Florida alumnus and a generous contributor to the Florida Gators sports program. Griffin was president of Alico, Inc., an agribusiness and land development company, and Citrus Hill, the family-owned citrus-growing business.
Spessard L. Holland Supporter Spessard Holland was an alumnus of the University of Florida College of Law. Holland was one of the founders of the law firm that became Holland & Knight, and was later elected governor of the state (1941–45) and a U.S. Senator from Florida (1946–71).
Daniel T. McCarty Supporter Dan McCarty was a University of Florida alumnus and decorated U.S. Army officer in World War II. He was elected speaker of the Florida House of Representatives and governor of the state.
Alfred A. McKethan Financial contributor Alfred McKethan was a University of Florida alumnus, citrus grower, cattleman and banker who served as the president of a small county bank that would become SunTrust Bank. McKethan was also a generous supporter of the Florida Gators sports program. He is the namesake of the university's baseball facility, Alfred A. McKethan Stadium.
J. Hillis Miller, Sr. President 1947–53 J. Hillis Miller served as the fourth president of the University of Florida for six years in the late 1940s and early 1950s. A strong supporter of intercollegiate athletics, Miller was responsible for several key decisions that led to changes in the administration and financing of the Florida Gators sports program, and the upgrading of the university's sports facilities.
Bill Potter Men's tennis 1952–77 Bill Potter was the head coach of the Florida Gators men's tennis team for twenty-six seasons. During Potter's tenure, the Gators won four SEC team championships.
Randy Reese Swimming 1976–90 Randy Reese was the head coach of the Florida Gators swimming and diving teams for fifteen years. During his tenure, the Gators men's and women's swimmers and divers won a combined seventeen SEC team championships, and four national team championships. Reese received four national coach of the year honors.
Mimi Ryan Women's golf 1973–94 Mimi Ryan was the first coach of the Florida Gators women's golf team. During her twenty-one years as head coach, Ryan's Lady Gators won six SEC team championships, and back-to-back NCAA national team championships in 1985 and 1986.
Harold L. "Tom" Sebring Football 1925–27 Tom Sebring was a law student who served as the head coach of the Gators football team for three seasons in the mid-1920s. The team's 8–2 record in 1925 and 7–3 record in 1927 were the two best in the first twenty-one years of the Gators football team.[12] Sebring became a justice of the Florida Supreme Court, a judge at the Nuremberg Trials, and the dean of the Stetson University College of Law.
George Steinbrenner Financial contributor George Steinbrenner was the principal owner of the New York Yankees, and several Tampa and Great Lakes-based shipping concerns. Steinbrenner was also a generous financial contributor to the Florida Gators sports program, and he and his wife donated the funds to build the Steinbrenner Band Hall.
G. A. "Pat" Summerall Supporter Placekicker Pat Summerall was a native of Lake City, Florida, and a ten-season veteran of the NFL before he became a national broadcaster for CBS Sports and Fox Sports.
John J. Tigert, IV President 1928–47 John Tigert was the third president of the University of Florida, and a strong advocate of intercollegiate sports. As a Vanderbilt undergraduate, he was an All-Southern halfback and a Rhodes Scholar. He later served as the U.S. Commissioner of Education for seven years. As university president, he was responsible for the construction of Florida Field, and was instrumental in the formation of the Southeastern Conference.
James A. Van Fleet Football 1923–24 James Van Fleet was a U.S. Army major and professor of military science in the university's ROTC program when he became the head coach of the Florida Gators football team. During his tenure, the Gators received their first national recognition with high-profile games against Alabama, Army, Georgia Tech and Texas. He later served as the commanding general of United States and United Nations armed forces during the Korean War.
Alfred C. Warrington, IV Financial contributor Alfred Warrington is a major financial contributor to the Florida Gators sports program, and the University of Florida generally. He is the namesake of the university's Warrington College of Business Administration, and previously served as chairman of the university's board of trustees. He was formerly a national partner in Arthur Andersen and a principal investor in Waste Management, Inc.
Ernestine Weaver Women's gymnastics 1980–92 Ernestine Weaver served as the head coach of the Florida Gators women's gymnastics team for twelve formative seasons. Her Lady Gators gymnasts were perennial conference and national contenders, won six SEC team championships and the 1982 AIAW national team championship, and made eleven consecutive appearances at the NCAA national championship tournament.[1]
G. Robert Woodruff Football,
Athletic Director
1950–59 Bob Woodruff served as the head coach of the Florida Gators football team and the athletic director of the Florida Gators sports program. His football teams won more games in ten years than those of any other coach in the first fifty-four years of Gators football. As athletic director, Woodruff expanded facilities, created a strong base of alumni and booster support, and put the program on a sound financial footing for the first time.
Everett M. Yon Athletic Director,
Administrator
1925–28
1950–66
Everett Yon played for the Florida Gators football team in 1914 and 1915, and the Gators baseball team in 1915 and 1916. Yon returned to the university as a U.S. Army captain and ROTC instructor, and served as athletic director of the Florida Gators sports program from 1925 to 1928. Yon returned again as a retired army colonel after World War II, and served as the president of Gator Boosters, Inc. until his death in 1966.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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  2. ^ a b c "University of Florida Announces 2014 UF Athletic Hall of Fame Inductees," GatorZone.com (September 11, 2013). Retrieved July 6, 2014.
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Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]