List of monastic houses in Wiltshire

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List of monastic houses in Wiltshire is located in Wiltshire
Amesbury Priory
Amesbury Priory
Ansty Preceptory
Ansty Preceptory
Avebury Priory
Avebury Priory
Bradenstoke Priory
Bradenstoke Priory
Bradford-on-Avon Monastery
Bradford-on-Avon Monastery
Charlton Priory
Charlton Priory
Clatford Priory
Clatford Priory
Corsham Priory
Corsham Priory
Easton Priory or Hospital (poss. site, Easton Royal)
Easton Priory or Hospital (poss. site, Easton Royal)
Edington Priory
Edington Priory
Fugglestone Priory
Fugglestone Priory
Great Bedwyn Monastery (poss. site)
Great Bedwyn Monastery (poss. site)
Ivychurch Priory
Ivychurch Priory
Kington St Michael Priory
Kington St Michael Priory
Lacock Abbey
Lacock Abbey
Longleat Priory
Longleat Priory
Loxwell Abbey
Loxwell Abbey
Maiden Bradley Priory
Maiden Bradley Priory
Malmesbury Abbey
Malmesbury Abbey
Marlborough Priory
Marlborough Priory
Marlborough Whitefriars
Marlborough Whitefriars
Monkton Farleigh Priory
Monkton Farleigh Priory
Ogbourne Priory
Ogbourne Priory
Rockley Preceptory
Rockley Preceptory
SALISBURY
SALISBURY
Stanley Abbey
Stanley Abbey
Tisbury Monastery
Tisbury Monastery
Tisbury Grange
Tisbury Grange
Upavon Priory
Upavon Priory
Wilton Priory
Wilton Priory
Wilton Blackfriars
Wilton Blackfriars
Locations of monastic houses in Wiltshire

The following is a list of monastic houses in Wiltshire, England.

In this article alien houses are included, as are smaller establishments such as cells and notable monastic granges (particularly those with resident monks), and also camerae of the military orders of monks (Templars and Hospitallers). The numerous monastic hospitals per se are not included here unless at some time the foundation had, or was purported to have the status or function of an abbey, priory, friary or preceptory/commandery.

The name of the county is given where there is reference to an establishment in another county. Where the county has changed since the foundation's dissolution the modern county is given in parentheses, and in instances where the referenced foundation ceased to exist before the unification of England, the kingdom is given, followed by the modern county in parentheses.

The geographical co-ordinates provided are sourced from the details provided by English Heritage Pastscape [2] and Ordnance Survey publications.

A Monastic Glossary follows the listing, which provides links to articles on the particular monastic orders as well as other terms which appear in the listing.

Abbreviations and key[edit]

The sites listed are ruins unless indicated thus:
* indicates current monastic function
+ indicates current non-monastic ecclesiastic function (including remains incorporated into later structure)
^ indicates current non-ecclesiastic function (including remains incorporated into later structure) or redundant intact structure
$ indicates remains limited to earthworks etc.
# indicates no identifiable trace of the monastic foundation remains
~ indicates exact site of monastic foundation unknown
identification ambiguous or confused

Locations with names in italics indicate probable duplication (misidentification with another location)
or non-existent foundations (either erroneous reference or proposed foundation never implemented)
or ecclesiastical establishments with a monastic appellation but lacking monastic connection.

Trusteeship denoted as follows:
EH English Heritage
LT Landmark Trust
NT National Trust

Alphabetical listing of establishments[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Amesbury Abbey Amesbury Abbey.jpg tradition of early monastery destroyed 6th century;
Benedictine nuns
abbey founded c.979 by Alfrida, widow of King Edwin;
Fontevrault Benedictine nuns
alien house: dependent on Fontevrault
priory refounded c.1176/7: Henry II obtained papal consent, abbess pensioned and nuns apparently expelled to other houses 1177, replaced by nuns from Fontevrault and Westwood;
Fontevrault Benedictine nuns and brothers double house
priors recorded from 1194;
became denizen: independent from sometime after 1403;
dissolved 1539; granted to Edward, Earl of Hertford 1540/1;
hypothesised that the current parish church was the church of the brethren, possibly built on the site of the early minster
Abbey of St Mary and St Melor (c.979)
____________________
Amesbury Priory
[1][2]

51°10′28″N 1°47′08″W / 51.1745305°N 1.7855063°W / 51.1745305; -1.7855063 (Amesbury Priory)
Ansty Preceptory ^(?) Knights Hospitaller
founded c.1220, manor granted by William de Turberville (Tubelville) 1210-1;
dissolved 1540; granted to J. Zouch 1546/7;
in use as a hospice after dissolution;
badly damaged by fire 1927; converted into an engineering workshop;
remains possibly incorporated into farmhouse at Manor Farm
[3][4]

51°02′11″N 2°03′50″W / 51.0364945°N 2.0639665°W / 51.0364945; -2.0639665 (Ansty Preceptory)
Avebury Priory Benedictine monks
alien house: cell dependent on St-Georges, Bocherville;
founded after 1114 by William de Tancarville (Tancervilla);
dissolved 1378; granted to Winchester College 1391;
granted to Sir William Sharington 1548/9;
manor house named 'Avebury Manor' built on site c.1557; alterations c.1730 and c.1907
[5][6]

51°25′44″N 1°51′32″W / 51.429016°N 1.8589747°W / 51.429016; -1.8589747 (Avebury Priory)
Bradenstoke Priory BradenstokePriory.JPG Augustinian Canons Regular
founded c.1139 (1142) by Walter D'Evereaux;
dissolved 17 January 1539; granted to Richard Pexhall 1546/7;
remains within farmstead named 'Bradenstoke Abbey'
Clack Priory [7][8]

51°30′44″N 2°00′07″W / 51.5121362°N 2.0020169°W / 51.5121362; -2.0020169 (Bradenstoke Priory)
Bradford-on-Avon Monastery Benedictine? monks
founded c.705-710 by St Aldhelm, Bishop of Sherborne;
granted to Shaftesbury, Dorset 1001;
served as charnel house in medieval period;
in use as a dwelling and a school 18th to mid-19th century;
restored 1870;
church now in ownership of the Wiltshire Archaeological Society
St Lawrence [9]

51°20′49″N 2°15′14″W / 51.3470125°N 2.2538334°W / 51.3470125; -2.2538334 (Bradford-on-Avon Monastery)
Briontune Priory Augustinian Canons Regular[note 1] St Mary Magdalene
____________________
Brioptune Priory
Britford Monastery (?) possible Saxon community
Bromham Monastery uncertain order and foundation
Calne Monastery (?) possible Saxon community
Charlton Priory Premonstratensian Canons
alien house: dependent on L'Isle-Dieu, Normandy
founded c.1187, granted to L'Isle-Dieu by Reginald de Pavely;
dissolved 1380; granted to the Hospital of St Katherine-by-the-Tower
granted to Sir William Sharington 1548/9
Charleton Priory [10]

51°18′11″N 1°50′37″W / 51.3030161°N 1.8435279°W / 51.3030161; -1.8435279 (Charlton Priory)
Clatford Priory Benedictine monks
alien house: cell dependent on St-Victor-en-Caux;
founded after 1104; manors granted by Hugh, son of Ralph de Mortimer;
dissolved c.1439; granted to Eton College 1441
Clatford and Hullavington Priory [11][12]

51°24′39″N 1°47′08″W / 51.410831°N 1.7856887°W / 51.410831; -1.7856887 (Clatford Priory)
Corsham Priory + possibly late Saxon minster;
St Bartholomew's church granted to St-Etienne, Caen by William the Conqueror;
Benedictine monks
alien house: cell dependent on Marmoutier;
founded before 1077, granted to Marmoutier between 1068 and 1135 (during the reign of Henry I);
dissolved 1294; administered by the Cluniacs at Tickford, ceasing as a priory, granted to King's College, Cambridge by Henry VI;
granted to Syon Abbey by Edward VI;
granted to Philip Moore 1608/9;
restored by G. E. Street and C. F. Hansom 1875-8
Cosham Priory [13][14]

51°26′02″N 2°10′56″W / 51.4338538°N 2.1823123°W / 51.4338538; -2.1823123 (Corsham Priory)
Cricklade Monastery (?) possible Saxon monks or secular community St Sampson
Damerham Monastery Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in Hampshire
Easton Priory or Hospital ~ Trinitarian
hostel founded 1245 by Stephen of Tisbury, Archdeacon of Salisbury;
priory founded 1251, priory church serving as both conventual and parochial;
destroyed by fire 1493; apparently restored
buildings were reported as in a ruinous state at dissolution;
dissolved 1536; granted to Sir Edward Seymour, Viscount Beauchamp 1536;
granted to Edward, Earl of Hertford 1608/9; present parish church possibly stands on or near the site of the conventual church

Eston Friary
[15][16][17]

51°20′32″N 1°42′15″W / 51.3422846°N 1.704163°W / 51.3422846; -1.704163 (Easton Priory or Hospital (possible site)) (possible)
Edington Priory + Edington priory church.JPG manor granted to the nuns at Romsey by King Edgar between 959 and 975;
present church built as a chantry chapel 1351 by William Edington, Bishop of Winchester on site of earlier church;
Bonshommes brothers[note 2]
church granted to the Bonshommes 1358 as their priory church, nave reserved for parochial use;
dissolved 1539; granted to William Pawlet, Lord St John 1541/2;
conventual church, restored 1881-91, now in parochial use as All Saints' parish church;
house named 'The Priory' possibly incorporates remains of the claustral buildings
St Mary, St Catherine and All Saints
____________________
All Saints' Church
Edindon Priory
[18][19][20]

51°16′44″N 2°06′25″W / 51.2789108°N 2.1068752°W / 51.2789108; -2.1068752 (Edington Priory)
Fisherton Anger Friary Dominican Friars
(community founded 1245 at Fugglestone);
transferred here 1281;
dissolved 1538
Fugglestone Priory Dominican Friars
founded 1245;
transferred to Fisherton Anger 1281 and thereafter retained as a cell until dissolution;
dissolved 1538;
apparently converted to domestic use when recorded early-19th century, when at least partly extant
[21]

51°04′55″N 1°51′20″W / 51.0820013°N 1.8556152°W / 51.0820013; -1.8556152 (Fugglestone Priory)
Great Bedwyn Monastery (?) apparent Saxon minster community 10th century, purported traces to the east of present parish church of St Mary, which is possibly on or near site of the Saxon foundation St Lawrence [22]

51°22′37″N 1°36′09″W / 51.3768402°N 1.6026306°W / 51.3768402; -1.6026306 (Great Bedwyn Monastery (possible site)) (possible)
Hullavington Grange (?) Benedictine monks
founded 1104;
dissolved after 1325
Ivychurch Priory Saxon minster apparently estabished as priory church;
Augustinian Canons Regular
founded before 1154 by King Stephen[note 3];
dissolved 1536
The Blessed Virgin Mary [23][24]

51°02′53″N 1°44′26″W / 51.0479184°N 1.7405954°W / 51.0479184; -1.7405954 (Ivychurch Priory)
Kington St Michael Priory Benedictine nuns
founded before 1155, probably by the family of Robert Wayfer de Brinton who granted land;
dissolved 1536; granted to Sir John Long 1538/9;
site now within farm
The Priory Church of St Mary, Kington St Michael
____________________
Keinton Priory
[25][26]

51°29′57″N 2°09′18″W / 51.4992184°N 2.1549471°W / 51.4992184; -2.1549471 (Kington St Michael Priory)
Lacock Abbey Lacock Abbey view from south.jpg Augustinian Canonesses
priory founded 1230-2 by Ela, Countess of Salisbury, widow of William Longspée, confirmed 1320;
raised to abbey status 1239-40
dissolved 21 January 1539; granted to Sir William Sharington 1540/1; (NT)
The Abbey Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary and Saint Bernard, Lacock [27][28]

51°24′52″N 2°07′02″W / 51.4145582°N 2.1171695°W / 51.4145582; -2.1171695 (Lacock Abbey)
Longleat Priory Longleat House.jpg Augustinian Canons Regular
founded before 1233
dissolved 1529; granted to Sir John Thynne 1540/1;
country house named 'Longleat House' built on site
[29][30]

51°11′09″N 2°16′28″W / 51.185732°N 2.2743255°W / 51.185732; -2.2743255 (Longleat Priory)
Loxwell Abbey # Cistercian monks
dependent on Quarr, Isle of Wight
founded 1151 by Empress Matilda, her son Henry and her chamberlain Drogo;
dissolved 1154; transferred to Stanley
[31]

51°25′40″N 2°04′09″W / 51.4276413°N 2.0691311°W / 51.4276413; -2.0691311 (Loxwell Abbey)
Maiden Bradley Priory originally a Lazer House
founded 1152 (before 1164) by Manasser Biset;
hospital for leper women in the care of secular brothers and priests;
Augustinian Canons Regular
founded 1184: granted by Bishop Hubert 1183-93[note 4];
priory founded before 1201[note 5];
dissolved 1536; granted to Sir Edward Seymore 1537/8
The Hospital and Priory Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary and Saint Lazarus, Maiden Bradley
____________________
Mayden Bradeley Priory
[32][33]

51°09′44″N 2°17′20″W / 51.1621336°N 2.2888067°W / 51.1621336; -2.2888067 (Maiden Bradley Priory)
Malmesbury Abbey MalmesburyAbbey2011.JPG British nuns (legendary)
purportedly founded before 603 (7th century);
dissolved by St Austin, Archbishop, in, or before, 604;
hermitage of Irish monk and hermit Mailduib possibly 637;
succeeded by St Aldhelm who built larger church of Our Saviour, SS Peter and Paul after 675;
Benedictine? monks
founded c.675;
secular canons collegiate
founded after 796;
Benedictine monks
founded before 965(-74) (675);
destroyed in raids by the Danes 1010;
soon rebuilt;
refounded before 1143 by William of Malmesbury;
dissolved 15 December 1539; granted to William Stump 1544/5;
church now in parochial use
Our Saviour, Saint Peter and Saint Paul, Malmesbury (after 675)

St Mary, Virgin (before 1143)
[34][35]

51°35′05″N 2°05′54″W / 51.5847032°N 2.0983511°W / 51.5847032; -2.0983511 (Malmesbury Abbey)
Marlborough Priory Gilbertine canons
founded before 1189(?) possibly by Henry II;
plundered and partly destroyed by fire 1337
dissolved January 1539; granted to Anthony Stringer;
The Priory Church of Saint Margaret, Marlborough
____________________
Marleburgh Abbey
[36][37]

51°25′05″N 1°43′27″W / 51.4180778°N 1.7242554°W / 51.4180778; -1.7242554 (Marlborough Priory)
Marlborough Whitefriars Carmelite Friars
founded c.1316 by John Godwin and William Ramesbesch (Rammeshulle): license granted 1 January 1316 for William de Rammeshulle to grant land;
dilapidated at time of suppression;
dissolved 1538; granted to John Pye and Robert Brown 1542/3;
demolished 1820;
fragments purportedly used in a house named 'the Priory'
Marleburgh Whitefriars [38][39]

51°25′10″N 1°43′54″W / 51.4194159°N 1.7317629°W / 51.4194159; -1.7317629 (Marlborough Whitefriars)
Monkton Farleigh Priory Cluniac monks
alien house: dependent on Lewes, Sussex;
projected by Humphrey de Bohun, probably founded 1120-1123 by his son Humphrey III and wife Maud, confirmed by Hugh, Prior of Lewes;
became denizen: independent from sometime during 1373-4;
dissolved 1536;
granted to Sir Edward Seymore 1536/7;
remains incorporated into house built on site 16th century
St Mary Magdalene
____________________
Farleigh Priory
[40][41]

51°23′20″N 2°16′47″W / 51.3888478°N 2.2797436°W / 51.3888478; -2.2797436 (Monkton Farleigh Priory)
Netheravon Monastery (?) documentary and physical suggestion of pre-Conquest monastic community
Ogbourne Priory Benedictine monks
alien house: dependent on Bec-Hellouin;
founded 1149 (before 1147), granted to Bec by Matilda de Wallingford with the assent of Henry, Duke of the Normans, and his mother Empress Matilda;
granted to the Duke of Bedford 1404-5; dissolved 1414;
spiritualities transferred to Windsor College 1421;
other possessions divided and granted to King's College, Cambridge and Eton College, the London Charterhouse and other establishments
Ogbourne Saint George Priory [42][43]

51°27′53″N 1°43′40″W / 51.4646491°N 1.7278683°W / 51.4646491; -1.7278683 (Ogbourne Priory)
Poulton Priory Former county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in Gloucestershire
Rockley Preceptory Knights Templar
founded 1155-6 by John Mareschall;
dissolved 1308-12;
Knights Hospitaller
manor or camera and chapel;
dissolved 1541; granted to Sir Thomas Stroude, Walter Erle and John Paget 1544/5
Temple Rockely Preceptory [44][45]

51°26′49″N 1°48′52″W / 51.4468528°N 1.814324°W / 51.4468528; -1.814324 (Rockley Preceptory)
Salisbury Blackfriars Dominican Friars (under the Visitation of London)
(community founded 1245 at Wilton)
transferred here 1281;
dissolved 1538; granted to John Pollard and William Byrte 1544/5
[46]

51°04′10″N 1°47′57″W / 51.0695054°N 1.799258°W / 51.0695054; -1.799258 (Salisbury Blackfriars)
Salisbury Greyfriars Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual (under the Custody of London)
founded before 1230;
dissolved 1538; granted to John Wroth 1544/5
[47][48]

51°03′53″N 1°47′30″W / 51.0646545°N 1.7915708°W / 51.0646545; -1.7915708 (Salisbury Greyfriars)
Stanley Abbey Cistercian monks
(community founded at Loxwell 1151);
transferred here 1154 by Henry II;
largely rebuilt 13th century;
dissolved 1536; granted to Sir Edward Bainton 1536/7
Stanlegh Abbey [49][50][51]

51°26′59″N 2°03′17″W / 51.4496912°N 2.0546472°W / 51.4496912; -2.0546472 (Stanley Abbey)
Stratton St Margaret Priory (?)[note 6] Benedictine monks
alien house
granted to King's College, Cambridge by Henry VI
Tisbury Monastery Saxon Benedictine? monks, possible minster
founded before 710;
dissolved after 759
land granted to Shaftesbury 984 (983), confirmed by King Ethelred;
parish church of St John the Baptist, built 1180-1200, possibly stands on site
[52]

51°03′44″N 2°04′53″W / 51.0621159°N 2.0812708°W / 51.0621159; -2.0812708 (Tisbury Monastery)
Tisbury Grange Benedictine nuns
grange dependent on Shaftesbury;
Place Farm currently occupies the site
[53]

51°03′44″N 2°04′53″W / 51.0621091°N 2.0812735°W / 51.0621091; -2.0812735 (Tisbury Grange)
Upavon Priory land and churches at Upavon and Sheraton held by St-Wandrille 1086;
Benedictine monks
alien house: cell dependent on St-Wandrille;
founded before 1086: land held by Domesday Survey[note 7];
cell founded by 12th century;
dissolved before 1414; granted to Ivychurch 1423;
granted to Francis and A. Anderson 1606/7
Uphaven Priory [54][55]

51°17′42″N 1°48′24″W / 51.2948798°N 1.8066059°W / 51.2948798; -1.8066059 (Upavon Priory)
Warminster Saxon 'minster'
Wilton Abbey church of St Mary founded by Weohstan, Ealdorman of Wiltshire;
nuns
founded c.830 (or 773), according to tradition, by petition of Weohstan's widow, Alburga, to King Egbert, to convert church of St Mary into a nunnery
refounded 890;
refounded 934;
Benedictine nuns
refounded before 970;
destroyed by Sweyn 1003;
rebuilt in stone by Edith, wife of Edward the Confessor, consecrated 1065;
dissolved 25 March 1539; granted to Sir William Herbert 1543/4;
conventual church and buildings demolished; outlying medieval building named 'the Almonry' remains;
house named 'Wilton House' built on site
St Mary and St Bartholomew

St Mary, St Bartholomew and St Edith (after 987)
[56][57]

51°04′42″N 1°51′33″W / 51.0782284°N 1.8591839°W / 51.0782284; -1.8591839 (Wilton Priory)
Wilton Blackfriars Dominican Friars (under the Visitation of London)
founded 1245;
dissolved 1281: transferred to Salisbury and thereafter probably only a vicarial house until 1538
[58][59]

51°04′42″N 1°51′33″W / 51.0782284°N 1.8591839°W / 51.0782284; -1.8591839 (Wilton Blackfriars)

Glossary[edit]


edit this box

Map link to lists of monastic houses in England by county[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Briontune/Brioptune - cited by Speed and Gervase of Canterbury; Tanner, Notitia Monastica, 609, indicates the county has no location of this name
  2. ^ Edington - affiliation cited by Discovering Abbeys & Priories, Geoffrey N. Wright and Victoria County History ([1]) as being one of the only two Bonshommes establishments in England
  3. ^ Ivychurch - founder cited by Hundred Rolls, 1274
  4. ^ Maiden Bradley - cited by Leland, Itinerary (ed. T. L. Smith (1910))
  5. ^ Maiden Bradley - earliest contemporary record of a prior 1201: D. Knowles & N. Hadcock, Medieval Religious Houses: England & Wales, (1971), p.165
  6. ^ Stratton St Margaret - listed by Dugdale, Monasticon Anglicanum; Tanner, Notitia Monastica annotates quaere ('query')
  7. ^ Upavon - Victoria County History: A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 2, p.119

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: AMESBURY ABBEY
  2. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine nuns: Abbey, later priory, of Amesbury — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.242-259)
  3. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ANSTY HOSPITALLERS PRECEPTORY
  4. ^ British History Online — House of Knights Hospitaller: Preceptory of Ansty — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.328-329)
  5. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: AVEBURY MANOR
  6. ^ British History Online — Alien Houses: Priory of Avebury — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.392-393)
  7. ^ Wiltshire Council — Wiltshire Community History Get Church Information
  8. ^ British History Online — Houses of Augustinian canons: Priory of Bradenstoke — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.275-288)
  9. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHURCH OF ST LAWRENCE
  10. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHARLTON PRIORY
  11. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CLATFORD PRIORY
  12. ^ British History Online — Alien Houses: Priory of Clatford or Hullavington — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.393-394)
  13. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHURCH OF ST BARTHOLOMEW
  14. ^ British History Online — Alien Houses: Priory of Corsham — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (p.394)
  15. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: EASTON PRIORY HOLY TRINITY CHURCH
  16. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: HOSPITAL OF ST MARY MAGDALENE
  17. ^ British History Online — House of Trinitarians: Priory or hospital of Easton — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.324-327)
  18. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHURCH OF ALL SAINTS
  19. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: THE PRIORY
  20. ^ British History Online — House of Bonhommes: Edington — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.320-324)
  21. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: FUGGLESTONE PRIORY
  22. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHURCH OF ST MARY THE VIRGIN
  23. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: IVYCHURCH PRIORY
  24. ^ British History Online — Houses of Augustinian canons: Priory of Ivychurch — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.289-295)
  25. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: KINGTON ST MICHAEL PRIORY
  26. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine nuns: Priory of Kington St Michael — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.259-262)
  27. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: LACOCK ABBEY
  28. ^ British History Online — Houses of Augustinian canonesses: Abbey of Lacock — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.303-316)
  29. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: LONGLEAT HOUSE
  30. ^ British History Online — Houses of Augustinian canons: Priory of Longleat — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.302-303)
  31. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: LOXWELL ABBEY
  32. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MAIDEN BRADLEY PRIORY
  33. ^ British History Online — Houses of Augustinian canons: Priory of Maiden Bradley | A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.295-302)
  34. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MALMESBURY ABBEY
  35. ^ British History Online — House of Benedictine monks: Abbey of Malmesbury — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.210-231)
  36. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST MARGARETS PRIORY
  37. ^ British History Online — Houses of Gilbertine canons: Priory of St Margaret, Marlborough — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.316-319)
  38. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MARLBOROUGH WHITEFRIARS
  39. ^ British History Online — House of Carmelite friars: Marlborough | A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.333-334)
  40. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MONKTON FARLEIGH PRIORY AND MANOR HOUSE
  41. ^ British History Online — House of Cluniac monks: Priory of Monkton Farleigh — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.262-268)
  42. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: OGBOURNE PRIORY
  43. ^ British History Online — Alien Houses: Priory of Ogbourne — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.394-396)
  44. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: TEMPLE ROCKLEY TEMPLARS PRECEPTORY
  45. ^ British History Online — Houses of Knights Templar: Preceptory of Temple Rockley | A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.327-328)
  46. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: SALISBURY BLACKFRIARS
  47. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: SALISBURY GREYFRIARS
  48. ^ British History Online — Houses of Franciscan friars: Salisbury — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.329-330)
  49. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: STANLEY ABBEY
  50. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ABBEY FARM COTTAGE
  51. ^ British History Online — House of Cistercian monks: Abbey of Stanley — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.269-275)
  52. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MONUMENT NO. 210467
  53. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: PLACE FARM
  54. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: UPAVON PRIORY
  55. ^ British History Online — Alien Houses: Priory of Upavon — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.396-397)
  56. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: WILTON ABBEY
  57. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine nuns: Abbey of Wilton — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.231-242)
  58. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: WILTON BLACKFRIARS
  59. ^ British History Online — Houses of Dominican friars: Wilton — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 3 (pp.330-331)
  • Binns, Alison (1989) Studies in the History of Medieval Religion 1: Dedications of Monastic Houses in England and Wales 1066-1216, Boydell
  • Cobbett, William (1868) List of Abbeys, Priories, Nunneries, Hospitals, And Other Religious Foundations in England and Wales and in Ireland, Confiscated, Seized On, or Alienated by the Protestant "Reformation" Sovereigns and Parliaments
  • Knowles, David & Hadcock, R. Neville (1971) Medieval Religious Houses England & Wales. Longman
  • Morris, Richard (1979) Cathedrals and Abbeys of England and Wales, J. M. Dent & Sons Ltd.
  • Thorold, Henry (1986) Collins Guide to Cathedrals, Abbeys and Priories of England and Wales, Collins
  • Thorold, Henry (1993) Collins Guide to the Ruined Abbeys of England, Wales and Scotland, Collins
  • Wright, Geoffrey N., (2004) Discovering Abbeys and Priories, Shire Publications Ltd.
  • English Cathedrals and Abbeys, Illustrated, Odhams Press Ltd.
  • Map of Monastic Britain, South Sheet, Ordnance Survey, 2nd edition, 1954