Stillwater Township, New Jersey

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Stillwater Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Stillwater
Map of Stillwater Township in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County in New Jersey.
Map of Stillwater Township in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Stillwater Township
Census Bureau map of Stillwater Township
Coordinates: 41°04′27″N 74°52′08″W / 41.074125°N 74.868878°W / 41.074125; -74.868878Coordinates: 41°04′27″N 74°52′08″W / 41.074125°N 74.868878°W / 41.074125; -74.868878[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Sussex
Incorporated December 27, 1824
Government[5]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Charles Gross (term ends December 31, 2013)[3][4]
 • Clerk Lynda Knott (acting)[4]
Area[1]
 • Total 28.385 sq mi (73.515 km2)
 • Land 27.061 sq mi (70.087 km2)
 • Water 1.324 sq mi (3.428 km2)  4.66%
Area rank 95th of 566 in state
8th of 24 in county[1]
Elevation[6] 718 ft (219 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 4,099
 • Estimate (2013)[10] 4,002
 • Rank 408th of 566 in state
12th of 24 in county[11]
 • Density 151.5/sq mi (58.5/km2)
 • Density rank 523rd of 566 in state
20th of 24 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07875[12][13]
Area code 973[14]
FIPS code[1][15][16][17] 34-70890
GNIS ID[6][17] 882262
Website www.stillwatertownshipnj.com

Stillwater Township is a township located in Sussex County, New Jersey, in the United States. Located in the Kittatinny Valley, Stillwater is a rural farming community with a long history of dairy farming. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 4,099.[8]

Historically, Stillwater was first settled in the eighteenth century by Palatine German immigrants who entered through the port of Philadelphia. In 1741, Casper Shafer, John George Wintermute (Windemuth), and their father-in-law Johan Peter Bernhardt settled along the Paulins Kill.[18] For the next 50 years, the village of Stillwater was essentially German, centered on a union church shared by Lutheran and German Reformed (Calvinist) congregations.[19] While the German population assimilated by the early nineteenth century, the evidence of their settlement remains in the architecture of the grist mills, lime kilns, and stone houses located throughout the valley.[18] Stillwater was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on December 27, 1824, from portions of Hardwick Township[20][21] when Sussex County was divided in half by the legislature a few weeks earlier to create Warren County.[22][23] Portions of the township were taken to form Fredon Township on February 24, 1904.[20]

In 2008, New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Stillwater Township as its 40th best place to live in its annual rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.[24]

History[edit]

Casper Shafer (1711-1784) constructed the first mill here in 1764, after an 1844 fire, it was reconstructed.

The township was created on December 27, 1824, by an act passed by the New Jersey Legislature.[20][25]

A prominent structure in the area's history is the Shafer Grist Mill. Originally built by Casper Shafer in 1741, it was moved approximately a half mile to its present location in 1764. It was rebuilt in 1844 and powered by water from the Paulins Kill. Casper's son, Nathan Armstrong Shafer lived in Whitehall Manor, which he built near what is now the center of the village. The gristmill operated commercially until 1955, making it one of the oldest, continuously operating, water-powered gristmills in the State of New Jersey.[citation needed] Aline Murray Kilmer, the widow of poet Joyce Kilmer, lived the last decade of her life at Whitehall, passing away there on October 1, 1941.[26][27]

In the early 1900s, Swartswood Lake became a major resort. Weekenders took the train into nearby Blairstown through the 1940s to stay at such places as the North Shore Inn, The Casino, and The Dove Island Inn (now a private home). Later, summer cabins became popular with Brooklyn weekenders.[citation needed]

The Stillwater creamery was built in 1910. Borden, Inc. later took control of the creamery.[citation needed]

In the 1920s, the Paulinskill River was dammed to create Paulinskill Lake and many summer residences sprang up. These summer cottages have grown into what is now a year-round community.[citation needed]

The Presbyterian Church is the most prominent feature in Stillwater village.[citation needed] Opposite the church is the former Stillwater Academy, an old schoolhouse that is now home to the Stillwater Historical Museum.[28] Stillwater was, and still is, primarily agricultural. The area is dotted with lime kilns, which used to burn lime to enrich the soil, but are now obsolete, becoming lost to history and the overgrowth of vegetation. An intact kiln still exists on Millbrook Road, a little more than two miles (3 km) from Stillwater village.

Roughly one-third of Stillwater Township's area was ceded to create Fredon Township in 1904.[20]

Geology and geography[edit]

Stillwater Township is located at 41°04′27″N 74°52′08″W / 41.074125°N 74.868878°W / 41.074125; -74.868878 (41.074125,-74.868878). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 28.385 square miles (73.515 km2), of which, 27.061 square miles (70.087 km2) of it was land and 1.324 square miles (3.428 km2) of it (4.66%) of it was water.[1][2]

Flanked to the west by Kittatinny Mountain, the Stillwater Township is located within the Ridge and Valley Physiographic Province, and the entire township is within the Kittatinny Valley a region of rolling hills and flat valley floors that is a section of the larger Great Appalachian Valley running 700 miles (1,100 km) from eastern Canada to northern Alabama. Elevations in this valley range from 400 to 1,000 feet (120–300 m).[29] According to Snell, "The surface of the country is generally uneven and hilly, and on the west exceedingly rugged and mountainous. Ponds and watercourses abound. Of the latter, the most important is the Paulinskill, a millstream of considerable consequence."[30] All of Stillwater Township is located in the Paulins Kill watershed which flows southwest through Sussex and Warren counties before joining the Delaware River near Columbia, New Jersey. The valley floor is part of the Ordovician Martinsburg Formation (shale and slate) which make up most of the valley—and the Jacksonburg Formation (mostly limestone).

Climate and weather[edit]

Stillwater Township, New Jersey
Climate chart (explanation)
J F M A M J J A S O N D
 
 
3.2
 
36
17
 
 
2.9
 
40
19
 
 
3.7
 
48
27
 
 
4
 
61
37
 
 
4.1
 
71
47
 
 
4.8
 
79
56
 
 
4.4
 
84
61
 
 
4.3
 
83
59
 
 
4.5
 
75
51
 
 
4.1
 
64
39
 
 
3.7
 
53
31
 
 
3.4
 
41
23
Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches
Source: The Weather Channel[31]

Stillwater Township is located in Northwestern New Jersey which has a humid continental climate (microthermal)—a cooler climate due to its higher elevations.

Neighborhoods[edit]

  • Stillwater is a small one-street village in the area that was first settled by Johan Peter Bernhardt and his two sons-in-law, John George Wintermute and Caspar Shafer. At the western terminus of end of Main Street where it meets County Route 521, the First Presbyterian Church of Stillwater is the dominant feature. As Main Street travels east, the Stillwater General Store (originally Garris's General Store) (1876), "Whitehall" (built in 1785 by Abraham Shafer), Casper Shafer's stonehouse (c. 1741), crossing the Paulins Kill near Shafer's grist mill (1764, 1844) and miller's house. An 1820 hostelry, the Stillwater Inn, recently was destroyed by fire. One half-mile (800 m) south of the Presbyterian church, is John George Wintermute's stonehouse (1755), his son Peter's stonehouse (1791). Located adjacent is Stillwater Cemetery—the site of the original Lutheran-Calvinist union church (1771-1838), the graves of the towns earliest settlers, and many eighteenth century ethnic German gravestones.
  • Swartswood
  • Middleville
  • Paulinskill Lake
  • Crandon Lakes (with a 2010 Census population of 496 in Stillwater Township, out of a CDP total of 1,178[32]) is a census-designated place (CDP) and unincorporated community split between Hampton Township and Stillwater Township.[33][34][35]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1830 1,381
1840 1,476 6.9%
1850 1,742 18.0%
1860 1,816 4.2%
1870 1,632 −10.1%
1880 1,502 −8.0%
1890 1,296 −13.7%
1900 1,108 −14.5%
1910 796 * −28.2%
1920 671 −15.7%
1930 706 5.2%
1940 679 −3.8%
1950 816 20.2%
1960 1,339 64.1%
1970 2,158 61.2%
1980 3,887 80.1%
1990 4,253 9.4%
2000 4,267 0.3%
2010 4,099 −3.9%
Est. 2013 4,002 [10][36] −2.4%
Population sources:
1830-1920[37] 1840[38] 1850-1870[39]
1850[40] 1870[41] 1880-1890[42]
1890-1910[43] 1910-1930[44]
1930-1990[45] 2000[46][47] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[20]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 4,099 people, 1,553 households, and 1,141 families residing in the township. The population density was 151.5 per square mile (58.5/km2). There were 1,930 housing units at an average density of 71.3 per square mile (27.5/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 97.07% (3,979) White, 0.66% (27) Black or African American, 0.05% (2) Native American, 0.71% (29) Asian, 0.02% (1) Pacific Islander, 0.20% (8) from other races, and 1.29% (53) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 2.20% (90) of the population.[7]

There were 1,553 households, of which 30.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.4% were married couples living together, 7.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.5% were non-families. 21.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.09.[7]

In the township, 21.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 22.0% from 25 to 44, 36.8% from 45 to 64, and 11.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.8 years. For every 100 females there were 97.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.1 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $79,367 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,830) and the median family income was $94,900 (+/- $17,365). Males had a median income of $50,600 (+/- $10,895) versus $52,587 (+/- $7,700) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $32,147 (+/- $2,398). About 7.0% of families and 7.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.2% of those under age 18 and 6.1% of those age 65 or over.[48]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 4,267 people, 1,494 households, and 1,154 families residing in the township. The population density was 157.3 people per square mile (60.7/km2). There were 2,030 housing units at an average density of 74.9 per square mile (28.9/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 97.96% White, 0.16% African American, 0.21% Native American, 0.47% Asian, 0.23% from other races, and 0.96% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.09% of the population.[46][47]

There were 1,494 households out of which 41.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.6% were married couples living together, 6.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.7% were non-families. 17.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.85 and the average family size was 3.27.[46][47]

In the township the population was spread out with 28.0% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 30.3% from 25 to 44, 26.6% from 45 to 64, and 8.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 97.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.6 males.[46][47]

The median income for a household in the township was $63,750, and the median income for a family was $71,563. Males had a median income of $48,580 versus $35,505 for females. The per capita income for the township was $24,933. About 1.6% of families and 2.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.1% of those under age 18 and 7.6% of those age 65 or over.[46][47]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Stillwater is governed under the township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected at-large directly by the voters in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election.[5] At an annual reorganization meeting held during the first week of January, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor.

As of 2013, members of the Stillwater Township Committee are Mayor Charles M. Gross (R, term on township committee and as mayor ends on December 31, 2013), Deputy Mayor George E. Scott (R, term on committee ends in 2015; term as deputy mayor ends in 2013), Lisa Chammings (R, 2014), Timmy L. Fisher (R, 2013) and Anita Straway (R, 2015).[49][50][51][52][53]

Local emergency services[edit]

As of 2010, the Township Committee disbanded the Stillwater Police Department. Pending a lawsuit against the township, the New Jersey State Police assumed police coverage on a full-time basis.[54]

The Stillwater Area Volunteer Fire Company and the Swartswood Volunteer Fire Department provide fire and rescue services to the township. The Stillwater Area Volunteer Fire Company also provides services to Hardwick Township, in Warren County, along with Blairstown Hose Company #1. Stillwater also provides ice rescue services to the western portion of the county.[55]

Stillwater station houses CAFS Pumper 42-62, Rescue-Pumper 42-61, Tanker/Pumper 42-71, and utility and special operations 42-81. Swartswood Station houses Pumper 45-62, Tanker 45-71, and Utility 45-81.

Stillwater Emergency Rescue Squad provides emergency medical services to the township, utilizing two full-size ambulances, and first response vehicles. EMS coverage is supplemented by The Stillwater Area Volunteer Fire Company's First Responder Division.

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Stillwater Township is located in the 5th Congressional District[56] and is part of New Jersey's 24th state legislative district.[8][57][58]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township).[59] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[60][61] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[62][63]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 24th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Steve Oroho (R, Franklin) and in the General Assembly by Alison Littell McHose (R, Franklin) and Parker Space (R, Wantage Township).[64][65] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[66] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[67]

Sussex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director from among its members, with day-to-day supervision of the operation of the county delegated to a County Administrator.[68] As of 2014, Sussex County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Richard Vohden (R, Green Township, 2016),[69] Deputy Director Dennis J. Mudrick (R, Sparta Township, 2015),[70] Phillip R. Crabb (R, Franklin, 2014),[71] George Graham (R, Stanhope, 2016)[72] and Gail Phoebus (R, Andover Township, 2015).[73][68] Graham was chosen in April 2013 to fill the seat vacated by Parker Space, who had been chosen to fill a vacancy in the New Jersey General Assembly.[74] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Jeff Parrott (R, 2016),[75] Sheriff Michael F. Strada (R, 2016)[76] and Surrogate Gary R. Chiusano (R, filling the vacancy after the resignation of Nancy Fitzgibbons).[77][74] The County Administrator is John Eskilson.[78][79]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 3,009 registered voters in Stillwater Township, of which 468 (15.6% vs. 16.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,384 (46.0% vs. 39.3%) were registered as Republicans and 1,153 (38.3% vs. 44.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 4 voters registered to other parties.[80] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 73.4% (vs. 65.8% in Sussex County) were registered to vote, including 94.0% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 86.5% countywide).[80][81]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 1,283 votes here (61.9% vs. 59.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 735 votes (35.5% vs. 38.2%) and other candidates with 49 votes (2.4% vs. 2.1%), among the 2,073 ballots cast by the township's 3,079 registered voters, for a turnout of 67.3% (vs. 68.3% in Sussex County).[82] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 1,389 votes here (59.7% vs. 59.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 872 votes (37.5% vs. 38.7%) and other candidates with 52 votes (2.2% vs. 1.5%), among the 2,328 ballots cast by the township's 2,978 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.2% (vs. 76.9% in Sussex County).[83] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 1,473 votes here (65.0% vs. 63.9% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 754 votes (33.3% vs. 34.4%) and other candidates with 35 votes (1.5% vs. 1.3%), among the 2,267 ballots cast by the township's 2,832 registered voters, for a turnout of 80.0% (vs. 77.7% in the whole county).[84]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,036 votes here (63.3% vs. 63.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 406 votes (24.8% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 157 votes (9.6% vs. 9.1%) and other candidates with 24 votes (1.5% vs. 1.3%), among the 1,637 ballots cast by the township's 2,991 registered voters, yielding a 54.7% turnout (vs. 52.3% in the county).[85]

Education[edit]

The Stillwater Township School District serves public school students in pre-Kindergarten through sixth grade at Stillwater Township School. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's one school had an enrollment of 366 students and 37.6 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 9.73:1.[86]

Students in seventh through twelfth grade for public school attend Kittatinny Regional High School located in Hampton Township, which serves students who reside in Fredon Township, Hampton Township, Sandyston Township and Walpack Township.[87] The high school is located in Hampton, about seven minutes outside of the county seat of Newton. Kittatinny Regional High School was recognized as a Blue Ribbon School of Excellence in 1997-98.[88]

Transportation[edit]

As of 2010, the township had a total of 60.77 miles (97.80 km) of roadways, of which 39.87 miles (64.16 km) were maintained by the municipality and 20.90 miles (33.64 km) by Sussex County.[89]

Local attractions[edit]

Parks and recreation[edit]

Stillwater is the home of Swartswood State Park, established in 1914 as the first state park established by the state of New Jersey. In the center of the park lies the Little Swartswood and Swartswood Lake. The park is operated and maintained by the New Jersey Division of Parks and Forestry.[90]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Stillwater Township include:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Directory, Stillwater Township, New Jersey. Accessed January 28, 2013.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 110.
  6. ^ a b U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Stillwater, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Stillwater township, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 25, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 11. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Stillwater township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed February 25, 2013.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 25, 2013.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Stillwater, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed February 25, 2013.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Stillwater, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed November 6, 2013.
  15. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed June 18, 2012.
  17. ^ a b "FIPS55 Data: New Jersey". FIPS55 Data. United States Geological Survey. February 23, 2006. 
  18. ^ a b c d Schaeffer, Casper and Johnson, William M. Memoirs and reminiscences : together with sketches of the early history of Sussex County, New Jersey. (Hackensack, N.J. : Privately printed, 1907), passim.
  19. ^ Chambers, Theodore Frelinghuysen. The Early Germans of New Jersey: Their History, Churches, and Genealogies. (Dover, New Jersey, Dover Printing Company, 1895), 631 ff.
  20. ^ a b c d e Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 232. Accessed October 25, 2012.
  21. ^ Snell, James P. (complied). History of Sussex and Warren Counties, New Jersey, with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Prominent Men and Pioneers. (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1881), 383.
  22. ^ Snell, James P. (complied). History of Sussex and Warren Counties, New jersey, with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Prominent Men and Pioneers. (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1881), 474.
  23. ^ The legislature's act of November 20, 1824 creating Warren County effectively divided Hardwick Township in half, see: State of New Jersey. Acts of the Legislature of the State of New Jersey. (1824), 146-147, subsequent acts would create Stillwater and Green Townships from parts of Hardwick, at 126.
  24. ^ "Best Places To Live - The Complete Top Towns List 1-100", New Jersey Monthly, February 21, 2008. Accessed February 24, 2008.
  25. ^ Snell, James P. (1881) History of Sussex and Warren Counties, New Jersey, With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Its Prominent Men and Pioneers. (Centennial ed., Harmony, NJ: Harmony Press, 1981), pg. 383
  26. ^ a b Talbot, Francis X. "A Tribute to Aline Kilmer" in America. (October 18, 1941), 46.
  27. ^ a b Staff. "KILMER CHILDREN GET $25,602 EACH; Soldier-Poet's Heirs Share in Estate Left by Their Grandfather in Jersey", The New York Times, January 31, 1937. Accessed January 20, 2013. "At Stillwater, N. J., today Mrs. Aline Kilmer, widow of the poet, said that her son, Kenton, in addition to his duties with the FHA, has been writing verse."
  28. ^ Stillwater Historical Museum, Historical Society of Stillwater Township. Accessed November 6, 2013. "From very early on this school in the Village of Stillwater was known as the 'The Academy'. Records from 1849 show there were 79 students. "
  29. ^ U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resource Conservation Service. Soil Survey of Sussex County, New Jersey (Washington, DC: 2009), 3.
  30. ^ Snell, 379.
  31. ^ "Monthly Averages for Stillwater, New Jersey". The Weather Channel. Retrieved January 21, 2013. 
  32. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Crandon Lakes CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 25, 2013.
  33. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 25, 2013.
  34. ^ 2006-2010 American Community Survey Geography for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 25, 2013.
  35. ^ New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, August 2012. Accessed February 25, 2013.
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  37. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed November 6, 2013.
  38. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed February 25, 2013.
  39. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 271, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed February 25, 2013. "Stillwater contained a population in 1850 of 1,742; in 1860, 1,816; and in 1870, 1,632."
  40. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 141. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed February 11, 2013.
  41. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed February 25, 2013.
  42. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed February 25, 2013.
  43. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 339. Accessed February 25, 2013.
  44. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 719. Accessed February 25, 2013.
  45. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed February 25, 2013.
  46. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Stillwater township, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 25, 2013.
  47. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Stillwater township, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 25, 2013.
  48. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Stillwater township, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 25, 2013.
  49. ^ Township Committee, Stillwater Township. Accessed November 6, 2013.
  50. ^ 2013 Municipal Data Sheet, Stillwater Township. Accessed November 6, 2013.
  51. ^ County Election Summary - General election November 2, 2010, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 8, 2010. Accessed February 25, 2013.
  52. ^ Summary Report - Group detail / General Election November 8, 2011, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 10, 2011. Accessed February 25, 2013.
  53. ^ County Summary With Detail - General Election: November 6, 2012, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 30, 2012. Accessed February 25, 2013.
  54. ^ Keller, Elisa D. "Stillwater disbands police department", New Jersey Herald, December 4, 2009. Accessed April 2, 2011.
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