Union Party (Ukraine)

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Party "Union"
Leader Lev Mirimsky[1]
Founded 11 June 1997 (1997-06-11)[2]
Headquarters Kiev
Ideology Regionalism[3]
Pro-Russia[4]
Political position Centre-left
International affiliation None
Colours Blue
Verkhovna Rada
1 / 450
Supreme Council of Crimea
5 / 100
Website
http://mir.im/
Politics of Ukraine
Political parties
Elections

The Party "Union" (Ukrainian: Партія "Союз") is a national political party of Ukraine that is mostly based in Crimea. It was registered in June 1997 under a registration number 867.[2]

The party won 1 seat in the Ukrainian parliament in the 2012 Ukrainian parliamentary election.[5]

History[edit]

The Constituent Party Congress took place on March 15, 1997. Svitlana Savchenko was elected the leader of the party. The congress also adopted the party's program and statute. The party was formed on the basis of the prohibited Crimean party.[6]

II Congress (October 4, 1997), city of Simferopol. At the congress was adopted the party's pre-election program.

III Congress (November 16, 1997). The congress confirmed the list of deputies for the next elections which was registered with Central Election Commission on December 18, 1997.

IV Congress (July 11, 1998). The congress reviewed the election campaign of the party and made some changes to the party's Political council and its statute. The party's flag was adopted as well. The flag represented by a white field (1x2 m) with a dark-blue circle in the middle where a friendly handshake of two hands is depicted. The top and bottom edges of the flag covered by red lanes in 1/8 of the flag's width.

During the Ukrainian presidential election, 2004 the party supported Viktor Yanukovych.[7]

Election results[2][edit]

During the Ukrainian parliamentary election, 1998 the party balloting independently won 0.70% of the national vote. Prior to the parliamentary elections of 2002 Lev Myrymsky stated that the party already had two of its representatives in the Verkhovna Rada although officially in proportional representation the party did not win seats in the national parliament[8] and only won a single seat by a single-seat constituency according to the official statistics from the Central Electoral Commission.[9] At the Ukrainian parliamentary election, 2002 the party was part of the Russian Bloc (Ukrainian: Русский блок) that got 0.73% of the votes and no seats. Ukrainian parliamentary election, 2006 the party was a member of the bloc "For Union" (Ukrainian: ЗА СОЮЗ), that bloc won 0.20% of the votes. In the 30 September 2007 elections, the party again failed as part of the Electoral Bloc of Political Parties "KUCHMA" to win parliamentary representation.

During the 2010 Ukrainian local elections the party won representatives in municipalities in Crimea and 5 seats (out of 100 total seats) in the Supreme Council of Crimea.[10][11]

In the 2012 Ukrainian parliamentary election the party won 1 constituency seat (in constituency 2 located in Simferopol; it had competed in 13 constituencies[12]) and thus parliamentary representation[13] by Lev Myrymsky who had scored 36.45% of the votes.[12][14] The parties second best results was in constituency 35 (located in Pavlohrad) with 4.32%.[12] In the other constituencies it did not score better than 3%, and in most cases scored below 1%.[12] Myrymsky did not join a faction in the Verkhovna Rada (Parliament) till he joined the then newly created faction For Peace and Stability on 2 July 2014.[15][16]

Political positions[edit]

The party wants Ukraine to join the Eurasian Union. Wants Russian to be the state language in Ukraine (currently Ukrainian is the only state language in Ukraine). The party is against Ukraine joining NATO, the rehabilitation of Nazi ideology and its supporters from the UNA-UNSO and "against the omnipotence of bureaucrats and corruption".[17]

In October 2009 the Crimean branch of the party asked Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin and Chief Executive of Gazprom Alexei Miller to consider the issue of possible deliveries of natural gas to Crimea and Sevastopol in 2009-2010 at prices charged to citizens of Russia.[18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ (Russian) Биография, Official party website
  2. ^ a b c (Ukrainian) Databases ASD: Political parties in Ukraine
  3. ^ http://www.parties-and-elections.eu/ukraine.html
  4. ^ http://www.parties-and-elections.eu/ukraine.html
  5. ^ Party of Regions gets 185 seats in Ukrainian parliament, Batkivschyna 101 - CEC, Interfax-Ukraine (12 November 2012)
  6. ^ (Ukrainian) Profile of Party "Soyuz" at Political compass website, party.civicua.org
  7. ^ (Ukrainian) Партія держслужбовця виступає за союз з Росією. І за Януковича, Ukrainska Pravda (October 20, 2004)
  8. ^ (Ukrainian) Партія "Союз" піде на вибори у блоці, Ukrainska Pravda (December 27, 2001)
  9. ^ Central Electoral Commission archives
  10. ^ (Ukrainian) Results of the elections, preliminary data, on interactive maps by Ukrayinska Pravda (November 8, 2010)
  11. ^ (Ukrainian) У Криму комуністи і партія «Союз» вимагають перерахунку голосів, Дзеркало тижня (November 3, 2010)
  12. ^ a b c d (Ukrainian) Candidates, RBC Ukraine
  13. ^ (Ukrainian) Proportional votes & Constituency seats & Single-mandate constituency № 2, Central Election Commission of Ukraine
  14. ^ Results of the vote count, Kyiv Post (9 November 2012)
  15. ^ (Ukrainian) National deputies of Ukraine:Lev Myrymsky, Verkhovna Rada
  16. ^ (Ukrainian) Dynamics in the fraction For Peace and Stability in the VII convocation, Verkhovna Rada
  17. ^ (Russian) За СОЮЗ, Сайт города СВАТОВО
  18. ^ Crimean organization of Soyuz party asks Russian leadership to deliver gas to Crimea at prices set for Russian population, Kyiv Post (October 29, 2009)

External links[edit]