United States House of Representatives elections in Michigan, 2010

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Elections were held on November 2, 2010, to determine Michigan's 15 members of the United States House of Representatives. Representatives were elected for two-year terms to serve in the 112th United States Congress from January 3, 2011 until January 3, 2013. Primary elections were held on August 3, 2010.[1]

Of the 15 elections, the 1st, 7th and 9th districts were rated as competitive by Sabato's Crystal Ball,[2][3][4] CQ Politics[5] and The Rothenberg Political Report,[6] while The Cook Political Report rated the 1st, 3rd, 7th and 9th districts as competitive.[7] Three of Michigan's fifteen incumbents (Bart Stupak of the 1st district,[8] Pete Hoekstra of the 2nd district[9] and Vern Ehlers of the 3rd district)[10] did not seek re-election. Of the twelve who did, one (Carolyn Cheeks Kilpatrick of the 13th district) was not renominated by her party,[11] and one (Mark Schauer of the 7th district) was unsuccessful in the general election.[12]

In total, nine Republicans and six Democrats were elected.[13] A total of 3,194,901 votes were cast, of which 1,671,707 (52 percent) were for Republicans, 1,415,212 (44 percent) were for Democrats, 43,279 (1 percent) were for Libertarian Party candidates, 27,273 (1 percent) were for U.S. Taxpayers Party candidates, 25,739 (1 percent) were for Green Party candidates, 11,238 (0.4 percent) were for independent candidates, 409 (0.01 percent) were for a Natural Law Party candidate and 44 (0.001 percent) were for write-in candidates.[14]

District 1[edit]

"Keith Shelton" redirects here. It is not to be confused with Keith Skelton.
Dan Benishek, who was elected as the U.S. Representative for the 1st district

In 2010 the 1st district included Marquette and Sault Ste. Marie.[15] The district's population was 93 percent white (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 88 percent were high school graduates and 18 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $40,243.[16] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 50 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 48 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.[15] In 2010 the district had a Cook Partisan Voting Index of R+3.[7]

Democrat Bart Stupak, who took office in 1993, was the incumbent. Stupak was re-elected in 2008 with 65 percent of the vote.[15] In 2010 Stupak retired rather than seeking re-election.[8] The candidates in the general election were Democratic nominee Gary McDowell, a member of the Michigan House of Representatives; Republican nominee Dan Benishek, a physician; Green Party nominee Ellis Boal, a former Charlevoix County commissioner and prosecutor; U.S. Taxpayers Party nominee Patrick Lambert, a shift supervisor at Kalitta Air; Libertarian Party nominee Keith Shelton, a sports reporter; and independent candidate Glenn Wilson, the owner of an Internet service provider.[17] Lonnie Lee Snyder had intended to run as a Tea Party candidate, but was found ineligible to do so in August 2010.[18]

McDowell ran unopposed in the Democratic primary, as Mike Prusi, a member of the Michigan Senate, announced in April 2010 that he would not run;[19] and Matt Gillard, a former member of the state House of Representatives;[20] Connie Saltonstall, a former county official;[20] and Joel Sheltrown, a member of the state House of Representatives,[21] ended their campaigns in May 2010. Jason Allen, a member of the state Senate; Patrick Donlon, a businessman; Don Hooper, the owner of a trucking business; and Tom Stillings, a steel industry sales representative, also sought the Republican nomination.[22] Linda Goldthorpe, a lawyer, suspended her campaign in July 2010; however her name remained on the Republican primary ballot.[23] Dennis Lennox, the Cheboygan County drain commissioner, ended his campaign for the Republican nomination in March 2010.[24] Jim Barcia, a former U.S. Representative;[25] and Kevin Elsenheimer, the leader of the Republican Party in the state House of Representatives,[26] both said in April 2010 they would not run. A poll conducted by Practical Political Consulting and released in July 2010, with a sample size of 140, found Benishek leading with 21 percent followed by Allen with 19 percent; Donlon, Goldthorpe, Hooper and Stillings each had the support of less than 2 percent of respondents, while around 55 percent were undecided.[27]

McDowell raised $838,208 and spent $838,160. Benishek raised $1,379,311 and spent $1,343,624. Wilson raised $127,237 and spent $118,276.[28] Allen raised $379,899 and spent $379,979.[29] Goldthorpe raised $9,244 and spent $5,410.[30]

A poll of 1,016 registered voters, conducted in August 2010 by We Ask America, found Benishek leading with 45 percent to McDowell's 29 percent, while 27 percent chose "Other/Unsure".[31] In a poll of 406 likely voters by TargetPoint Consulting, conducted for Benishek's campaign between August 31 and September 1, 2010, Benishek led McDowell by 39 percent to 25 percent when the names of Wilson and Snyder were also given, and by 54 percent to 31 percent when Benishek and McDowell were the only names offered.[32] A poll of 400 likely voters conducted by Hill Research Associates for the National Republican Congressional Committee between September 19 and September 21, 2010, found Benishek leading with 40 percent to McDowell's 24 percent.[33] In a poll by Greenberg Quinlan Rosner for McDowell's campaign, conducted on September 21 and 22, 2010 with a sample size of 505 likely voters, Benishek led with 41 percent while McDowell received 38 percent, Wilson received 12 percent and 9 percent were undecided.[32] A poll of 401 likely voters published by The Hill, conducted between October 2 and 7, 2010, 42 percent of respondents supported Benishek while 39 percent favored McDowell and 18 percent were undecided.[34] In a poll of 400 likely voters by EPIC/MRA, conducted on October 17 and 18, 2010, Benishek led with 42 percent to McDowell's 40 percent.[35] Though Benishek won the Republican primary by a margin of only 15 votes, Allen, who placed second, chose not to seek a recount.[36]

Sabato's Crystal Ball rated the race as "Leans Republican".[2] In October 2010 The Cook Political Report[7] and CQ Politics[5] rated the race as "Leans Republican". In November 2010 The Rothenberg Political Report rated the race as "Toss-up/Tilt Republican".[6] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Benishek an 88 percent chance of winning, and projected that he would receive 52 percent of the vote to McDowell's 45 percent.[37] On election day Benishek was elected with 52 percent of the vote to McDowell's 41 percent.[38] Both Benishek and McDowell ran again in the 1st district in 2012, when Benishek was re-elected to a second term.[39]

Republican primary results[edit]

Michigan's 1st congressional district Republican primary, August 3, 2010[40]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dan Benishek 27,077 38.14%
Republican Jason Allen 27,062 38.12%
Republican Tom Stillings 5,418 7.63%
Republican Linda Goldthorpe 4,980 7.01%
Republican Don Hooper 3,969 5.59%
Republican Patrick Donlon 2,490 3.51%
Totals 70,996 100.00%

General election results[edit]

Michigan's 1st congressional district general election, November 2, 2010[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dan Benishek 120,523 51.94%
Democratic Gary McDowell 94,824 40.87%
Independent Glenn Wilson 7,847 3.38%
U.S. Taxpayers Patrick Lambert 4,200 1.81%
Libertarian Keith Shelton 2,571 1.11%
Green Ellis Boal 2,072 0.89%
Totals 232,037 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 2[edit]

Bill Huizenga, who was elected as the U.S. Representative for the 2nd district

The 2nd district included Holland, Muskegon and Norton Shores.[41] The district's population was 86 percent white and 6 percent Hispanic (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 88 percent were high school graduates and 21 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $47,736.[42] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 51 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 47 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[41]

Republican Pete Hoekstra, who took office in 1993, was the incumbent. Hoekstra was re-elected in 2008 with 62 percent of the vote.[41] In 2010 Hoekstra ran for Governor of Michigan rather than seeking re-election.[9] The candidates in the general election were Republican nominee Bill Huizenga, a member of the Michigan House of Representatives; Democratic nominee Fred Johnson, an associate professor of history at Hope College; Green Party nominee Lloyd Clarke, a former United Auto Workers representative;[43] Libertarian Party nominee Joseph Gillotte, the founder and owner of Presort Services Inc.;[44] and U.S. Taxpayers Party nominee Ronald Graeser, a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine.[43]

Bill Cooper, a small business owner; Wayne Kuipers, a member of the Michigan Senate; Chris Larson, a member of the Ferrysburg city council; Field Reichardt, the president of the Organic Olive Oil Co., Jay Riemersma, a former American football player; and Ted Schendel, a retired police officer, also sought the Republican nomination.[45] Jeff Wincel, the owner of a consulting firm, sought the Republican nomination but ended his campaign in April 2010.[46] In a poll of 335 likely Republican voters, conducted between July 26 and 28, 2010 by The Grand Rapids Press, 25 percent of respondents favored Riemersma, while 15 percent favored Cooper, the same percentage favored Huizenga, 13 percent favored Kuipers, and 30 percent were undecided.[47] After the primary Huizenga led Riemersma by less than 700 votes; however Riemersma released a statement saying he would not seek a recount.[48] Nicolette McClure, a Lake County commissioner, also sought the Democratic nomination.[45]

Huizenga raised $684,347 and spent $634,952. Johnson raised $125,474 and spent $119,305.[49] Cooper raised $310,497 and spent the same amount.[50] Kuipers raised $232,223 and spent the same amount.[51] Reichardt raised $151,160 and spent $151,064.[52] Riemersma raised $917,362 and spent $915,037.[53] Schendel raised $6,451 and spent $6,651.[54] Wincel raised $14,185 and spent $14,044.[55] McClure raised $20,856 and spent $19,429.[56]

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Huizenga a 100 percent chance of winning, and projected that he would receive 63 percent of the vote to Johnson's 34 percent.[57] On election day Huizenga was elected with 65 percent of the vote to Johnson's 32 percent.[58] Huizenga was re-elected to a second term in 2012.[59]

Republican primary results[edit]

Michigan's 2nd district Republican primary, August 3, 2010[60]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bill Huizenga 27,041 25.40%
Republican Jay Riemersma 26,378 24.77%
Republican Wayne Kuipers 23,226 21.81%
Republican Bill Cooper 20,584 19.33%
Republican Field Reichardt 4,517 4.24%
Republican Ted Schendel 2,401 2.25%
Republican Chris Larson 2,332 2.19%
Totals 106,479 100.00%

Democratic primary results[edit]

Washington's 2nd district Democratic primary, August 3, 2010[60]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Fred Johnson 12,375 59.94%
Democratic Nicolette McClure 8,272 40.06%
Totals 20,647 100.00%

General election results[edit]

Michigan's 2nd congressional district general election, November 2, 2010[58]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bill Huizenga 148,864 65.27%
Democratic Fred Johnson 72,118 31.62%
Libertarian Joseph Gillotte 2,701 1.18%
U.S. Taxpayers Ronald Graeser 2,379 1.04%
Green Lloyd Clarke 2,016 0.88%
Totals 228,078 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 3[edit]

"Ted Gerrard" redirects here. It is not to be confused with Ted Jarrard.
Michigan's 3rd district
Justin Amash, who was elected as the U.S. Representative for the 3rd district
Patrick Miles Jr., who also ran in the 3rd district

The 3rd district included Grand Rapids and Wyoming.[61] The district's population was 80 percent white, 8 percent Hispanic and 8 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 88 percent were high school graduates and 28 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $51,386.[62] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican nominee John McCain and Democratic nominee Barack Obama each received 49 percent of the vote in the district.[61] In 2010 the district had a Cook Partisan Voting Index of R+6.[7]

Republican Vern Ehlers, who took office in 1993, was the incumbent. Ehlers was re-elected in 2008 with 61 percent of the vote.[61] In 2010 Ehlers retired rather than seeking re-election.[10] The candidates in the general election were Republican nominee Justin Amash, a member of the Michigan House of Representatives;[63] Democratic nominee Patrick Miles Jr., a lawyer;[64] U.S. Taxpayers Party nominee Ted Gerrard, an electrician; Libertarian Party nominee James Rogers, a technical consultant in the fields of renewable energy and HVAC; and Green Party nominee Charlie Shick, an employee in the field of warehouse inventory control.[63]

Bill Hardiman, a member of the Michigan Senate; Steve Heacock, a former Kent County commissioner; Louise "Ellie" Johnson, an attorney; and Bob Overbeek, a United States Air Force veteran, also sought the Republican nomination.[45] Terri Lynn Land, the Secretary of State of Michigan;[65] and Dick Posthumus, a former Lieutenant Governor of Michigan;[66] both said in February 2010 that they would not seek the Republican nomination. In a poll of 485 likely voters, conducted by The Grand Rapids Press between July 26 and 30, 2010, 28 percent of respondents favored Amash, while 23 percent supported Hardiman, 17 percent backed Heacock, and 26 percent were undecided.[67] Paul Mayhue, a former Kent County commissioner, also sought the Democratic nomination.[45]

Amash raised $1,103,513 and spent $1,093,007. Miles raised $990,599 and spent $988,091. Gerrard raised $1,405 and spent $2,082. Rogers raised $7,920 and spent $8,611.[68] Hardiman raised $209,236 and spent $202,459.[69] Heacock raised $393,212 and spent the same amount.[70] Overbeek raised $9,213 and spent $6,789.[71] Mayhue raised $11,636 and spent $9,773.[72]

In a poll of 1,006 registered voters, conducted by We Ask America in August 2010, 51 percent of respondents supported Amash while 30 percent favored Miles and 19 percent chose "Other/Unsure".[31] A poll of 400 likely voters, conducted by EPIC/MRA between October 16 and 19, 2010, found Amash leading with 46 percent to Miles's 37 percent, while 8 percent supported other candidates and 9 percent were undecided.[73] A poll of 400 likely voters, conducted by Public Opinion Strategies on October 19 and 20, 2010, found Amash leading with 49 percent to Miles's 30 percent.[74]

In October 2010 The Cook Political Report rated the race as "Likely Republican".[7] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Amash a 99 percent chance of winning, and projected that he would receive 59 percent of the vote to Miles's 38 percent.[75] On election day Amash was elected with 60 percent of the vote to Miles's 37 percent.[76] In July 2012 Miles was confirmed as the United States Attorney for the Western District of Michigan.[77] In November of that year Amash was re-elected to a second term.[78]

Republican primary results[edit]

Michigan's 3rd district Republican primary, August 3, 2010[79]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Justin Amash 38,569 40.35%
Republican Steve Heacock 25,157 26.32%
Republican Bill Hardiman 22,715 23.76%
Republican Bob Overbeek 5,133 5.37%
Republican Louise Johnson 4,020 4.21%
Totals 95,594 100.00%

Democratic primary results[edit]

Michigan's 3rd district Democratic primary, August 3, 2010[79]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Patrick Miles Jr. 14,114 68.53%
Democratic Paul Mayhue 6,480 31.47%
Totals 20,594 100.00%

General election results[edit]

Michigan's 3rd congressional district general election, November 2, 2010[76]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Justin Amash 133,714 59.68%
Democratic Patrick Miles Jr. 83,953 37.47%
Libertarian James Rogers 2,677 1.19%
U.S. Taxpayers Ted Gerrard 2,144 0.96%
Green Charlie Shick 1,575 0.70%
Totals 224,063 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 4[edit]

Dave Camp, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 4th district

The 4th district included Mount Pleasant and part of Midland.[80] The district's population was 91 percent white (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 88 percent were high school graduates and 21 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $43,605.[81] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 50 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 48 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.[80]

Republican Dave Camp, who took office in 1991, was the incumbent. Camp was re-elected in 2008 with 62 percent of the vote.[80] In 2010, Camp's opponent in the general election was Democratic nominee Jerry M. Campbell, a former supervisor of Richfield Township, Roscommon County.[82] Libertarian Party nominee John Emerick and U.S. Taxpayers Party nominee Clint Foster, a home remodeling sales representative, also ran.[83] Both Camp and Campbell were unopposed in their party primaries.[84]

Camp raised $3,051,808 and spent $2,148,515. Campbell raised $15,881 and spent $15,880.[85] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Camp a 100 percent chance of winning, and projected that he would receive 66 percent of the vote to Campbell's 31 percent.[86] On election day Camp was re-elected with 66 percent of the vote to Campbell's 31 percent.[87] Camp was again re-elected in 2012.[88]

General election results[edit]

Michigan's 4th district general election, November 2, 2010[87]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dave Camp (incumbent) 148,531 66.20%
Democratic Jerry Campbell 68,458 30.51%
U.S. Taxpayers John Emerick 3,861 1.72%
Libertarian Clint Foster 3,504 1.56%
Totals 224,354 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 5[edit]

"Michael J. Moon" redirects here. For the co-founder and CEO of GISTICS Inc., see Michael Jay Moon.
Michigan's 5th district
Dale Kildee, who was re-elected as the U.S Representative for the 5th district

The 5th district included Bay City, Burton, Flint and Saginaw.[89] The district's population was 76 percent white and 18 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 87 percent were high school graduates and 18 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $42,578.[90] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 64 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 35 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.[89]

Democrat Dale Kildee, who took office in 1977, was the incumbent. Kildee was re-elected with 70 percent of the vote in 2008.[89] In 2010, Kildee's opponent in the general election was Republican nominee John Kupiec, a businessman.[91] Green Party nominee J. Matthew de Heus, an instructor at Delta College, also ran.[44] Libertarian Party nominee Michael J. Moon, a technician at XO Communications,[44] withdrew from the race in October 2010.[92] Rick Wilson, a former supervisor for General Motors, also sought the Republican nomination. Scott Withers, the owner of Withers Media and a former vice president of the Auction Network, also sought the Democratic nomination.[45]

Kildee raised $622,561 and spent $1,207,958. Kupiec raised $356,589 and spent $356,390.[93] Wilson raised $71,073 and spent $70,114.[94] Withers raised $14,628 and spent $13,660.[95]

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Kildee a 100 percent chance of winning, and projected that he would receive 63 percent of the vote to Kupiec's 34 percent.[96] In October 2010 John Fund of The Wall Street Journal named the race as one of "five districts that could deliver upset victories", citing the possibility that Michigan's straight-ticket voting system would result in Rick Snyder's successful gubernatorial campaign affecting the results of congressional races.[97] On election day Kildee was re-elected with 53 percent of the vote to Kupiec's 44 percent.[98] Kildee retired rather than seeking re-election in 2012 and was succeeded by his nephew Dan Kildee.[99]

Democratic primary results[edit]

Michigan's 5th district Democratic primary, August 3, 2010[100]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dale Kildee (incumbent) 34,902 78.43%
Democratic Scott Withers 9,596 21.57%
Totals 44,498 100.00%

Republican primary results[edit]

Michigan's 5th district Republican primary, August 3, 2010[100]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Kupiec 22,177 55.69%
Republican Rick Wilson 17,643 44.31%
Totals 39,820 100.00%

General election results[edit]

Michigan's 5th district general election, November 2, 2010[98]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dale Kildee (incumbent) 107,286 53.04%
Republican John Kupiec 89,680 44.34%
Green J. de Heus 2,649 1.31%
Libertarian Michael Moon 2,648 1.31%
Totals 202,263 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 6[edit]

Fred Upton, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 6th district
Jack Hoogendyk, who also ran in the Republican primary in the 6th district
Don Cooney, who also ran in the 6th district

The 6th district included Kalamazoo, Niles, Portage and Sturgis.[101] The district's population was 83 percent white, 8 percent black and 5 percent Hispanic (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 88 percent were high school graduates and 24 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $45,661.[102] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 54 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 44 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.[101]

Republican Fred Upton, who took office in 1987, was the incumbent. In 2008 Upton was re-elected with 59 percent of the vote.[101] In 2010, Upton's opponent in the general election was Democratic nominee Don Cooney, a Kalamazoo city commissioner and professor of social work. Green Party nominee Pat Foster, an accountant; Libertarian Party nominee Fred Strand, a restaurant owner and retired airline pilot; and U.S. Taxpayers Party nominee Mel Valkner, a business owner and accountant, also ran.[103] Jack Hoogendyk, a former member of the Michigan House of Representatives, also sought the Republican nomination.[104] Cooney was unopposed in the Democratic primary.[105]

Upton raised $2,014,321 and spent $2,083,790. Cooney raised $62,447 and spent $61,614.[106] Hoogendyk raised $67,817 and spent $66,644.[107]

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Upton a 100 percent chance of winning, and projected that he would receive 63 percent of the vote to Cooney's 34 percent.[108] On election day Upton was re-elected with 62 percent of the vote to Cooney's 34 percent.[109] Upton was again re-elected in 2012,[110] while in 2013 Cooney ran for re-election as city commissioner.[111]

Republican primary results[edit]

Michigan's 6th district Republican primary, August 3, 2010[112]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Fred Upton (incumbent) 42,182 57.12%
Republican Jack Hoogendyk 31,660 42.88%
Totals 73,842 100.00%

General election results[edit]

Michigan's 6th district general election, November 6, 2010[109]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Fred Upton (incumbent) 123,142 61.98%
Democratic Don Cooney 66,729 33.58%
U.S. Taxpayers Melvin Valkner 3,672 1.85%
Libertarian Fred Strand 3,369 1.70%
Green Pat Foster 1,784 0.90%
Totals 198,696 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 7[edit]

Tim Walberg, who was elected as the U.S. Representative for the 7th district
Mark Schauer, who unsuccessfully ran for re-election in the 7th district

The 7th district included Battle Creek and Jackson.[113] The district's population was 88 percent white and 6 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 89 percent were high school graduates and 22 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $50,824.[114] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 52 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 46 percent to Republican Party nominee John McCain.[113] In 2010 the district had a Cook Partisan Voting Index of R+2.[7]

Democrat Mark Schauer, who took office in 2009, was the incumbent. Schauer was elected in 2008 with 49 percent of the vote.[113] In 2010, Schauer's opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Tim Walberg, a former U.S. Representative.[115] U.S. Taxpayers Party nominee Scott Eugene Aughney, a sales and marketing agent in the food industry;[44] write-in candidate Dan Davis;[116] Libertarian Party nominee Greg Merle, an insurance salesman; and Green Party nominee Richard E. Wunsch, a taxi driver and bookstore owner, also ran.[44] Davis, a former police officer, had intended to run as a Tea Party candidate in the general election but was removed from the ballot in August 2010.[18]

Schauer ran unopposed in the Democratic primary. Marvin Carlson, a businessman; and Iraq war veteran Brian Rooney also sought the Republican nomination.[117] Mike Stahly also briefly ran in the Republican primary, but ended his campaign due to fundraising difficulties.[118] Former U.S. Representative Joe Schwarz, a Republican, said in April 2009 that he would not run again.[119] In a poll of the Republican primary, released by Inside Michigan Politics in July 2010, 48 percent of respondents supported Walberg while 16 percent favored Rooney and 30 percent were undecided.[120]

Schauer raised $3,255,382 and spent $3,261,651. Walberg raised $1,678,049 and spent $1,647,379. Aughney raised $723 and spent $715.[121] Carlson raised $42,180 and spent $42,798.[122] Rooney raised $777,205 and spent $767,104.[123]

In a poll of 300 likely voters conducted by National Research Inc. for Walberg's campaign, the results of which were published in January 2010, 46 percent of respondents supported Walberg while 37 percent favored Schauer. Among the same sample Schauer led Rooney by 39 percent to 31 percent.[124] A poll of 1,008 likely voters conducted by We Ask America on August 4, 2010 found Walberg leading with 45 percent to Schauer's 37 percent while 18 percent were undecided.[31] In a poll of 400 likely voters, conducted by Republican pollster Whit Ayres between August 16 and 18, 2010, that informed respondents of Schauer's support for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Walberg led with 50 percent to Schauer's 40 percent.[125] A poll by Rossman Group and Team TelCom, conducted on September 20, 2010 with a sample size of 300 likely voters, found Walberg leading with 42 percent to Schauer's 38 percent.[126] An internal poll for Schauer's campaign by Myers Research & Strategic Services, published on September 23, 2010, found Schauer leading in a two-candidate race with 49 percent to Walberg's 45 percent, and in a multi-candidate race with 45 percent to Walberg's 43 percent while third party candidates collectively received 5 percent.[127] In a poll of 404 likely voters conducted between September 25 and 27, 2010, and published by The Hill Schauer and Walberg received the support of 41 percent of respondents each, while 13 percent remained undecided.[128] In a poll of 500 likely voters, conducted by Myers Research & Strategic Services on October 3 and 4, 2010, Schauer led with 44 percent to Walberg's 40 percent, while 7 percent supported third party candidates.[129] An EPIC/MRA poll of 400 people, conducted on October 16 and 17, found Schauer leading with 45 percent to Walberg's 39 percent.[130] In a poll conducted for 6 News with a margin of error of plus or minus 5 percent, the results of which were published on October 27, 2010, 50 percent of respondents supported Schauer, while 43 percent favored Walberg, 3 percent chose Wunsch, Aughney and Merle received the support of 1 percent apiece, and 2 percent were undecided.[131] An internal poll with a margin of error of 5.6 percent, conducted by National Research Inc. for Walberg's campaign and published on October 28, 2010, found Walberg leading Schauer by 13 percentage points.[132]

Sabato's Crystal Ball rated the race as "Leans Republican".[3] In October 2010 The Cook Political Report rated the race as a "toss up"[7] and CQ Politics rated the race as a "tossup".[5] In November 2010 The Rothenberg Political Report rated the race as a "Pure Toss-up".[6] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Walberg a 59 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 49 percent of the vote to Schauer's 48 percent.[133] On election day Walberg was elected with 50 percent of the vote to Schauer's 45 percent.[134] Walberg was again re-elected in 2012.[135] In May 2013 Schauer announced he would run for Governor of Michigan in 2014.[136]

Republican primary results[edit]

Michigan's 7th district Republican primary, August 3, 2010[137]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tim Walberg 41,784 57.47%
Republican Brian Rooney 23,505 32.33%
Republican Marvin Carlson 7,413 10.20%
Totals 72,702 100.00%

General election results[edit]

Michigan's 7th district general election, November 2, 2010[134]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tim Walberg 113,185 50.16%
Democratic Mark Schauer (incumbent) 102,402 45.38%
U.S. Taxpayers Scott Aughney 3,705 1.64%
Libertarian Greg Merle 3,239 1.44%
Green Richard Wunsch 3,117 1.38%
Write-in Danny Davis 21 0.01%
Totals 225,669 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 8[edit]

Michigan's 8th district
Mike Rogers, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 8th district

The 8th district included East Lansing, Holt and part of Lansing.[138] The district's population was 87 percent white and 5 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 92 percent were high school graduates and 32 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $59,508.[139] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 53 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 46 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.[138]

Republican Mike Rogers, who took office in 2001, was the incumbent. Rogers was re-elected in 2008 with 57 percent of the vote.[138] Rogers announced in February 2009 that he would not run for Governor of Michigan in 2010.[140] Rogers's opponent in 2010 was Democratic nominee Lance Enderle, who ran Leslie's alternative education program.[141] Libertarian Party nominee Bhagwan Dashairya, the president and chief executive officer of Dashairya & Associates, also ran.[44] Rogers ran unopposed in the Republican primary.[142] Enderle ran unopposed as a write-in candidate in the Democratic primary after health care analyst Kande Ngalamulume suspended his campaign after the withdrawal deadline.[141]

Rogers raised $1,778,687 and spent $861,244. Enderle raised $12,339 and spent $12,169.[143] Ngalamulume raised $27,036 and spent the same amount.[144]

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Rogers a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 63 percent of the vote to Enderle's 34 percent.[145] On election day Rogers was re-elected with 64 percent of the vote to Enderle's 34 percent.[146] Rogers and Enderle both ran again in 2012, when Rogers was again re-elected.[147]

General election results[edit]

Michigan's 8th district general election, November 2, 2010[146]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Rogers (incumbent) 156,931 64.08%
Democratic Lance Enderle 84,069 34.33%
Libertarian Bhagwan Dashairya 3,881 1.58%
Write-in Katherine Houston 11 0.00%
Write-in Eric Harvey 2 0.00%
Totals 244,894 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 9[edit]

Gary Peters, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 9th district

The 9th district included Auburn Hills, Farmington Hills, Pontiac, Rochester Hills, Troy and parts of Royal Oak and Waterford.[148] The district's population was 77 percent white, 10 percent black and 7 percent Asian (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 93 percent were high school graduates and 48 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $72,774.[149] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 56 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 43 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.[148] In 2010 the district had a Cook Partisan Voter Index of D+2.[7]

Democrat Gary Peters, who took office in 2009, was the incumbent. Peters was elected in 2008 with 52 percent of the vote.[148] In January 2010 Peters said he would not run for Governor of Michigan that year.[150] Peters's opponent in 2010 was Republican nominee Rocky Raczkowski, a former member of the Michigan Legislature.[151] Green Party nominee Douglas Campbell, an engineer; and independent candidate Matthew Kuofie, a professor at institutions including the University of Michigan, also ran. Libertarian Party nominee Adam Goodman, a district manager for Ovations Dining; and independent candidate Bob Gray, an educator and former member of the executive board of the Michigan Republican Party,[44] both of whose names appeared on the ballot, ended their campaigns prior to the election.[152]

Peters ran unopposed in the Democratic primary.[22] Anna Janek, a beauty consultant; Richard Kuhn, a former circuit court judge; and Paul Welday, a businessman, also sought the Republican nomination.[151] Gene Goodman, a manufacturer, ran as a Republican but ended his campaign in May 2010.[153] A poll of 120 likely Republican voters, conducted by Mitchell Research & Communication for Welday's campaign on March 31 and April 1, 2010 and on April 4 and 5, 2010, found Welday leading with 25 percent to Raczkowski's 17 percent, while Goodman received 2 percent.[154] In a poll of 900 likely Republican voters, conducted by Strategic National for Raczkowski's campaign on April 29, 2010, 26 percent of respondents favored Raczkowski while 15 percent supported Welday and 59 percent were undecided.[155]

Peters raised $3,284,646 and spent $3,236,452. Raczkowski raised $2,038,244 and spent $1,995,898.[156] Kuhn raised $51,378 and spent the same amount.[157] Welday raised $561,897 and spent $560,794.[158] Goodman raised $16,118 and spent the same amount.[159]

In a poll conducted by The Rossman Group and Team TelCom, the results of which were published in September 2010, 45 percent of the 300 respondents intended to vote for Raczkowski while 41 percent supported Peters and 10 percent were undecided.[160] A poll of 400 people, conducted by EPIC/MRA on October 16 and 17, 2010, found Peters leading with 48 percent to Raczkowski's 43 percent.[130] In a poll by Great Lakes Strategies, published later in October 2010 and with a sample size of 700, Raczkowski led with 48 percent to Peters's 43 percent.[161]

Sabato's Crystal Ball rated the race as "Leans Democratic".[4] In October 2010, The Cook Political Report rated the race as "Lean Democratic"[7] and CQ Politics rated the race as "Likely Democratic".[5] In November 2010 The Rothenberg Political Report rated the race as "Lean Democrat".[6] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Peters a 76 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 51 percent of the vote to Raczkowski's 47 percent.[162]

On election day Peters was re-elected with 50 percent of the vote to Raczkowski's 47 percent.[163] In 2012 Peters was again re-elected in the new 14th district;[164] and in May 2013 he announced he would run for the U.S. Senate in 2014.[165]

Republican primary results[edit]

Michigan's 9th district Republican primary, August 3, 2010[166]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rocky Raczkowski 33,459 41.97%
Republican Paul Welday 22,298 27.97%
Republican Richard Kuhn 15,949 20.01%
Republican Anna Janek 8,006 10.04%
Totals 79,712 100.00%

General election results[edit]

Michigan's 9th district general election, November 2, 2010[163]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gary Peters (incumbent) 125,730 49.76%
Republican Rocky Raczkowski 119,325 47.23%
Libertarian Adam Goodman 2,601 1.03%
Green Douglas Campbell 2,484 0.98%
Independent Bob Gray 1,866 0.74%
Independent Matthew Kuofie 644 0.25%
Totals 252,650 100.00%

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

District 10[edit]

Candice Miller, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 10th district

The 10th district included Port Huron, Shelby and part of Sterling Heights.[167] The district's population was 92 percent white (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 88 percent were high school graduates and 21 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $58,791.[168]In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 50 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 48 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[167]

Republican Candice Miller, who took office in 2003, was the incumbent. Miller was re-elected in 2008 with 66 percent of the vote.[167] In 2010 her opponent in the general election was Democratic nominee Henry Yanez, a firefighter and paramedic.[169] Libertarian Party nominee Claude Beavers, a private practice attorney;[44] and Green Party nominee Candace R. Caveny, a retired Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine,[170] also ran. Both Miller and Yanez ran unopposed in their respective party primaries.[171]

Miller raised $761,649 and spent $846,119.[172] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Miller a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that she would receive 69 percent of the vote to Yanez's 29 percent.[173] On election day Miller was re-elected with 72 percent of the vote to Yanez's 25 percent.[174] Miller was again re-elected in 2012.[175]

General election results[edit]

Michigan's 10th district general election, November 2, 2010[174]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Candice Miller (incumbent) 168,364 71.97%
Democratic Henry Yanez 58,530 25.02%
Libertarian Claude Beavers 3,750 1.60%
Green Candace Caveny 3,286 1.40%
Totals 233,930 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 11[edit]

Thaddeus McCotter, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 11th district

The 11th district included Canton, Garden City, Livonia, Novi, Redford and Westland.[176] The district's population was 83 percent white, 7 percent black and 5 percent Asian (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 91 percent were high school graduates and 33 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $66,868.[177] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 54 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 45 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.[176]

Republican Thaddeus McCotter, who took office in 2003, was the incumbent. McCotter was re-elected in 2008 with 51 percent of the vote.[176] In 2010 McCotter's opponent in the general election was Democratic nominee Natalie Mosher, a nonprofit consultant.[178] Libertarian Party nominee John J. Tatar, the owner of a construction company, also ran.[44] McCotter and Mosher were unopposed in their respective party primaries.[179] Andy Dillon, the speaker of the Michigan House of Representatives, said in March 2009 that he would not seek the Democratic nomination.[180]

McCotter raised $1,195,301 and spent $870,514. Mosher raised $307,081 and spent the same amount.[181] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave McCotter a 99 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 58 percent of the vote to Mosher's 39 percent.[182] On election day McCotter was re-elected with 59 percent of the vote to Mosher's 38 percent.[183]

In July 2011, McCotter announced he would run for president in 2012.[184] McCotter ended his campaign in September 2011[185] and resigned as a U.S. Representative in June 2012 after failing to qualify for the primary ballot.[186] He was succeeded by Democrat David Curson.[187] In September 2013 Mosher announced she would seek a seat in the Michigan House of Representatives in 2014.[188]

General election results[edit]

Michigan's 11th district general election, November 2, 2010[183]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Thaddeus McCotter (incumbent) 141,224 59.27%
Democratic Natalie Mosher 91,710 38.49%
Libertarian John Tatar 5,353 2.25%
Totals 238,287 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 12[edit]

Sander Levin, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 12th district

The 12th district included Clinton, Roseville, Southfield, St. Clair Shores, Warren and part of Sterling Heights.[189] The district's population was 75 percent white and 18 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 86 percent were high school graduates and 21 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $49,559.[190] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 65 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 33 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.[189]

Democrat Sander Levin, who took office in 1983, was the incumbent. He was re-elected in 2008 with 72 percent of the vote.[189] In 2010 his opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Don Volaric, the owner of a health insurance agency.[191] Natural Law Party nominee Alan Jacquemotte; Libertarian Party nominee Leonard Schwartz, a lawyer and former professor of business law; U.S. Taxpayers Party nominee Les Townsend, a former officer of the Internal Revenue Service; and Green Party nominee Julia Williams, an critical care and emergency room nurse, also ran.[44]

Michael Switalski, a member of the Michigan Senate, also sought the Democratic nomination.[45] In a poll of 400 likely Democratic primary voters, taken on March 17 and 18, 2010 by the Mellmann Group for Levin's campaign, 62 percent of respondents favored Levin while 14 percent supported Switalski and 24 percent were undecided.[192] Volaric was unopposed in the Republican primary.[63]

Levin raised $2,345,155 and spent $2,392,309. Volaric raised $62,174 and spent $57,383.[193] Switalski raised $51,553 and spent $46,450.[194]

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Levin a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 67 percent of the vote to Volaric's 30 percent.[195] On election day Levin was re-elected with 61 percent of the vote to Volaric's 35 percent.[196] Levin and Volaric both ran again in 2012, when Levin was again re-elected.[197]

Democratic primary results[edit]

Michigan's 12th district Democratic primary, August 3, 2010[198]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sander Levin (incumbent) 42,732 75.86%
Democratic Michael Switalski 13,480 24.14%
Totals 55,852 100.00%

General election results[edit]

Michigan's 12th district general election, November 2, 2010[196]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sander Levin (incumbent) 124,671 61.08%
Republican Don Volaric 71,372 34.97%
Green Julia Williams 3,038 1.49%
Libertarian Leonard Schwartz 2,342 1.15%
U.S. Taxpayers Les Townsend 2,285 1.12%
Natural Law Alan Jacquemotte 409 0.20%
Totals 204,117 100.00%

External links[edit]

District 13[edit]

"Vincent T. Brown" redirects here. For others with the same or similar names, see Vincent Brown (disambiguation).
Hansen Clarke, who was elected as the U.S. Representative for the 13th district
Carolyn Cheeks Kilpatrick, who unsuccessfully sought re-election in the 13th district

The 13th district included parts of Detroit and Lincoln Park.[199] The district's population was 59 percent black, 28 percent white and 10 percent Hispanic (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 76 percent were high school graduates and 15 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $32,212.[200] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 85 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 14 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.[199]

Democrat Carolyn Cheeks Kilpatrick, who took office in 1997, was the incumbent. Kilpatrick was re-elected in 2008 with 74 percent of the vote. In 2010 Hansen Clarke, a member of the Michigan Senate,[45] successfully challenged Kilpatrick in the Democratic primary.[11] In the general election Clarke faced Republican nominee John Hauler, a military contractor and the founder of the Metro Detroit Freedom Coalition; Green Party nominee George Corsetti, a criminal defense attorney; independent candidate Duane Montgomery, an information system consultant; and Libertarian Party nominee Heidi Peterson, an actress and model.[44] John W. Broad, the president of Crime Stoppers of Michigan; Vincent T. Brown, a community organizer with Clean Water Action; Stephen Hume, a boat yard operator; and Glenn Plummer, the founder and chair of the Christian Television Network, also sought the Democratic nomination.[45] Hauler ran unopposed in the Republican primary.[201]

In a poll with a sample size of 137, conducted by Practical Political Consulting and Inside Michigan Politics and released in June 2010, Clarke led with 27 percent to Kilpatrick's 19 percent.[202] A poll of 400 likely voters conducted by EPIC/MRA on July 6 and 7, 2010 found Clarke leading with 44 percent to Kilpatrick's 31 percent, while Broad, Brown, Hume and Plummer collectively received 9 percent.[203] In a poll conducted by The Detroit News and WDIV, released on July 16, 2010, 38 percent of respondents supported Clarke while 30 percent favored Kilpatrick.[204]

Kilpatrick raised $640,991 and spent $784,219.[205] Clarke raised $578,399 and spent $346,510. Hauler raised $33,160 and spent $16,855.[206] Broad raised $228,690 and spent $133,148.[207] Plummer raised $55,113 and spent $53,401.[208]

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Clarke a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 68 percent of the vote to Hauler's 29 percent.[209] On election day Clarke was re-elected with 79 percent of the vote to Hauler's 18 percent.[210] In 2010 Clarke ran unsuccessfully in the Democratic primary in the redrawn 14th district,[211] while Hauler was again unsuccessful as the Republican nominee.[164]

Democratic primary results[edit]

Michigan's 13th district Democratic primary, August 3, 2010[212]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Hansen Clarke 22,573 47.32%
Democratic Carolyn Kilpatrick (incumbent) 19,507 40.89%
Democratic Glenn Plummer 2,038 4.27%
Democratic John Broad 1,872 3.92%
Democratic Vincent Brown 893 1.87%
Democratic Stephen Hume 820 1.72%
Totals 47,703 100.00%

General election results[edit]

Michigan's 13th district general election, November 2, 2010[210]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Hansen Clarke 100,885 79.39%
Republican John Hauler 23,462 18.46%
Green George Corsetti 1,032 0.81%
Independent Duane Montgomery 881 0.69%
Libertarian Heidi Peterson 815 0.64%
Write-in James Casha 1 0.00%
Totals 127,076 100.00%

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

District 14[edit]

John Conyers, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 14th district

The 14th district included Allen Park, Hamtramck, Southgate and parts of Dearborn and Detroit.[213] The district's population was 60 percent black and 34 percent white (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 81 percent were high school graduates and 16 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $37,323.[214] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 86 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 13 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.[213]

Democrat John Conyers, who took office in 1965, was the incumbent. Conyers was re-elected in 2008 with 92 percent of the vote.[213] In 2010 his opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Don Ukrainec, an instructor in the Riverview Community School District. Libertarian Party nominee Richard J. Secula, a former skilled tradesman; and U.S. Taxpayers Party nominee Marc J. Sosnowski, a property manager, also ran.[44] Conyers was unopposed in the Democratic primary.[215] Pauline Montie, the owner of Montie's Shell, Montie's Service and Al's Garage, also sought the Republican nomination.[45]

Conyers raised $1,137,010 and spent $1,127,587. Ukrainec raised $16,506 and raised the same amount.[216] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Conyers a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 77 percent of the vote to Ukrainec's 21 percent.[217] On election day Conyers was re-elected with 77 percent of the vote to Ukrainec's 20 percent.[218] Conyers was again re-elected in 2012.[219]

Republican primary results[edit]

Michigan's 14th district Republican primary, August 2, 2010[220]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Don Ukrainec 7,435 55.43%
Republican Pauline Montie 5,978 44.57%
Totals 13,413 100.00%

General election results[edit]

Michigan's 14th district general election, November 2, 2010[218]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Conyers (incumbent) 115,511 76.76%
Republican Don Ukrainec 29,902 19.87%
U.S. Taxpayers Marc Sosnowski 3,206 2.13%
Libertarian Richard Secula 1,859 1.24%
Totals 150,478 100.00%

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

District 15[edit]

"Aimee Smith" redirects here. For other people with the same or similar names, see Amy Smith (disambiguation).
"John J. Lynch" redirects here. For other people with the same or similar names, see John Lynch (disambiguation).
"Tony Amorose" redirects here. It is not to be confused with Tony Ambrose.
John Dingell, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 15th district
Rob Steele, who also ran in the 15th district

The 15th district included Inkster, Monroe, Romulus, Taylor and parts of Ann Arbor, Dearborn and Dearborn Heights.[221] The district's population was 77 percent white, 13 percent black and 5 percent Asian (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 88 percent were high school graduates and 29 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $54,013.[222] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 66 percent its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 33 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.[221]

Democrat John Dingell, who took office in 1955, was the incumbent. Dingell was re-elected in 2008 with 71 percent of the vote.[221] In 2010 Dingell's opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Rob Steele, a cardiologist. U.S. Taxpayers Party nominee Matthew Lawrence Furman, who formerly worked in equipment repair and maintenance at the University of Michigan; Libertarian Party nominee Kerry L. Morgan, an attorney; and Green Party nominee Aimee Smith, the vice chair of the Green Party of Michigan, also ran.[44] Dingell was unopposed in the Democratic primary.[215] Tony Amorose, a teacher with Dearborn Public Schools; John J. "Jack" Lynch, a database systems project manager with the Eaton Corporation; and Majed A. Moughni, an attorney, also sought the Republican nomination.[45]

Dingell raised $1,960,195 and spent $2,790,616. Steele raised $1,059,929 and spent the same amount.[223] Amorose raised $6,475 and spent $6,370.[224] Lynch raised $17,750 and spent $17,971.[225]

In a poll of 400 likely voters, conducted in the week preceding September 20, 2010 by Glengariff Group Inc., 49 percent of respondents supported Dingell while 30 percent favored Steele.[226] A poll with a sample size of 300, conducted by the Rossman Group and Team TelCom on October 4, 2010, found Steele leading with 44 percent to Dingell's 40 percent while 11 percent were undecided.[227] In a poll of 400 likely voters, conducted by EPIC/MRA between October 16 and 19, 2010, Dingell led with 53 percent to Steele's 36 percent.[228]

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Dingell a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 59 percent of the vote to Steele's 38 percent.[229] On election day Dingell was re-elected with 57 percent of the vote to Steele's 40 percent.[230] Dingell was again re-elected in 2012.[231]

Republican primary results[edit]

Michigan's 15th district Republican primary, August 3, 2010[232]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rob Steele 18,358 50.76%
Republican John Lynch 11,946 33.03%
Republican Tony Amorose 4,488 12.41%
Republican Majed Moughni 1,374 3.80%
Totals 36,166 100.00%

General election results[edit]

Michigan's 15th district general election, November 2, 2010[230]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Dingell (incumbent) 118,336 56.81%
Republican Rob Steele 83,488 40.08%
Green Aimee Smith 2,686 1.29%
Libertarian Kerry Morgan 1,969 0.95%
U.S. Taxpayers Matthew Furman 1,821 0.87%
Write-in Louis Czako 9 0.00%
Totals 208,309 100.00%

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2010 Official Michigan Primary Candidate Listing". Michigan Department of State. July 28, 2010. Retrieved January 2, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b "Michigan (01) House 2010". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved January 2, 2014. 
  3. ^ a b "Michigan (07) House 2010". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved January 2, 2014. 
  4. ^ a b "Michigan (09) House 2010". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved January 2, 2014. 
  5. ^ a b c d "Race Ratings Chart: House". CQ Politics. Archived from the original on October 28, 2010. Retrieved January 5, 2014. 
  6. ^ a b c d "House Ratings". The Rothenberg Political Report. November 1, 2010. Retrieved January 2, 2014. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i "2010 competitive House race chart". The Cook Political Report. October 26, 2010. Archived from the original on October 28, 2010. Retrieved January 5, 2014. 
  8. ^ a b Allen, Mike; Kraushaar, Josh (April 9, 2010). "Rep. Bart Stupak won't seek reelection". Politico. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  9. ^ a b Kraushaar, Josh (March 30, 2009). "Hoekstra running for governor". Politico. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  10. ^ a b Scott, Monica (February 10, 2010). "U.S. Rep. Vern Ehlers to retire after 16 years in Congress". MLive.com. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  11. ^ a b Foley, Aaron (August 4, 2010). "Clouded by son's scandal, U.S. Rep. Carolyn Cheeks Kilpatrick loses party nomination to Hansen Clarke". MLive.com. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  12. ^ Gautz, Chris (November 3, 2010). "Update: Tim Walberg defeats U.S. Rep. Mark Schauer for two-year term in Congress". Jackson Citizen Patriot. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  13. ^ "Michigan". The New York Times. Retrieved January 19, 2014. 
  14. ^ Haas, Karen L. (June 3, 2011). "Statistics of the congressional election of November 2, 2010". Clerk of the United States House of Representatives. p. 25. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  15. ^ a b c "Michigan – 1st District". Roll Call. October 14, 2010. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  16. ^ "Michigan 1st District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  17. ^ Veselenak, David (October 14, 2010). "Six vying for 1st Congressional seat after Bart Stupak's retirement". The Bay City Times. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  18. ^ a b Hunt, Kasie (August 31, 2010). "No Michigan ballot slot for 'Tea Party'". Politico. Retrieved January 5, 2014. 
  19. ^ "Prusi says no". UpNorthLive.com. April 16, 2010. Retrieved February 17, 2010. 
  20. ^ a b Burns, Alexander (May 12, 2010). "Dem clears primary for Stupak seat". Politico. Retrieved January 4, 2014. 
  21. ^ "Sheltrown withdraws from race to replace Stupak". Petoskey News. May 3, 2010. Retrieved February 17, 2010. 
  22. ^ a b "Kilpatrick one of several congressional candidates facing crowded primary in Michigan". MLive.com. August 3, 2010. Retrieved January 4, 2014. 
  23. ^ Hubbard, Brandon (July 14, 2010). "Goldthorpe 'suspends' campaign". Petoskey News-Review. Archived from the original on July 17, 2010. Retrieved February 17, 2010. 
  24. ^ Geraghty, Jim (March 30, 2010). "Lennox Drops House Bid Against Stupak, Backs Benishek". National Review. Retrieved February 17, 2010. 
  25. ^ Newmyer, Tory; Cadei, Emily (April 12, 2010). "Democrats: Stupak Move Doesn't Signal Rush for Exits". Roll Call. p. 3. Retrieved February 17, 2010. 
  26. ^ Hoffman, Kathy Barks (April 13, 2010). "Elsenheimer decides against run for Stupak seat". Star-Banner. Retrieved February 17, 2010. 
  27. ^ Hubbard, Brandon (July 13, 2010). "Poll: Benishek, Allen even in battle for GOP nomination". Petoskey News. Retrieved January 4, 2014. 
  28. ^ "Michigan District 01 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 4, 2014. 
  29. ^ "Jason Allen (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 4, 2014. 
  30. ^ "Linda J. Goldthorpe (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 4, 2014. 
  31. ^ a b c "Mash-up in Michigan". We Ask America. August 25, 2010. Retrieved January 5, 2014. 
  32. ^ a b Miller, Tricia (September 24, 2010). "Michigan: McDowell Poll Shows a Tied Race". CQ Politics. Archived from the original on September 26, 2010. Retrieved January 5, 2014. 
  33. ^ Jacobs, Jeremy P. (September 29, 2010). "Starting Lineup: Midwest Trouble For House Dems". National Journal. Archived from the original on October 3, 2010. Retrieved January 5, 2014. 
  34. ^ "District by district – Michigan". The Hill. October 13, 2010. Archived from the original on October 19, 2010. Retrieved January 5, 2014. 
  35. ^ Spangler, Todd (October 25, 2010). "Battle for Stupak's seat is a nail-biter". Detroit Free Press. Archived from the original on November 4, 2010. Retrieved January 5, 2014. 
  36. ^ Hunt, Kasie (August 16, 2010). "Allen won't request recount against Benishek". Politico. Retrieved February 27, 2010. 
  37. ^ "Michigan 1st District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved January 5, 2014. 
  38. ^ a b "1st District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position". Michigan Department of State. March 2, 2011. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  39. ^ Oosting, Jonathan (November 7, 2012). "Election results 2012: U.S. Rep. Benishek declares victory in Michigan race separated by 2,300 votes". MLive.com. Retrieved January 5, 2014. 
  40. ^ "1st District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position". Michigan Department of State. October 6, 2010. Retrieved January 5, 2014. 
  41. ^ a b c "Michigan – 2nd District". Roll Call. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  42. ^ "Michigan 2nd District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  43. ^ a b "Five seek 2nd Congressional post long held by Peter Hoekstra". MLive.com. October 26, 2010. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  44. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "Bio sketches of Michigan congressional candidates". Charleston Gazette-Mail. November 2, 2010. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  45. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Bio sketches of Michigan congressional candidates". WVEC. August 5, 2010. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  46. ^ "Wincel drops out of Congressional race". The Holland Sentinel. April 15, 2010. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  47. ^ Roelofs, Ted (August 1, 2010). "Press poll shows Jay Riemersma leading Republican field to succeed Pete Hoekstra, but 2nd District race remains too close to call". The Grand Rapids Press. Retrieved February 22, 2014. 
  48. ^ "Michigan's Riemersma: No Recount". Roll Call. August 5, 2010. Retrieved February 22, 2014. 
  49. ^ "Michigan District 02 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  50. ^ "William C. Cooper (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  51. ^ "Wayne Kuipers (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  52. ^ "John Field Reichardt (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  53. ^ "Allen Jay Riemersma (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  54. ^ "Edward Ted Schendel (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  55. ^ "Jeff Wincel (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  56. ^ "Nicolette McClure (D)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  57. ^ "Michigan 2nd District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  58. ^ a b "2nd District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position". Michigan Department of State. March 2, 2011. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  59. ^ "Rep. Bill Huizenga wins re-election". The Holland Sentinel. November 7, 2012. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  60. ^ a b "2nd District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position". Michigan Department of State. October 6, 2010. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  61. ^ a b c "Michigan – 3rd District". Roll Call. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  62. ^ "Michigan 3rd District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  63. ^ a b c "Five candidates in the race to win 3rd Congressional seat". MLive.com. October 26, 2010. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  64. ^ Harger, Jim (August 4, 2010). "Patrick Miles Jr. wins Democratic primary, says moderate message can win in November". MLive.com. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  65. ^ Cranson, Jeff (February 11, 2010). "Terri Lynn Land won't run for Grand Rapids-based Congressional seat". The Grand Rapids Press. Retrieved February 22, 2014. 
  66. ^ "No Shortage of Possible GOP Candidates to Succeed Ehlers". Roll Call. February 11, 2010. Retrieved February 22, 2014. 
  67. ^ Roelofs, Ted (August 1, 2010). "Upstart Justin Amash builds support in outlying areas of 3rd Congressional District but remains within reach of rivals, Press poll shows". The Grand Rapids Press. Retrieved February 22, 2014. 
  68. ^ "Michigan District 03 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 7, 2014. 
  69. ^ "Bill Hardiman (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 7, 2014. 
  70. ^ "Steven R. Heacock (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 7, 2014. 
  71. ^ "Robert John Overbeek (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 7, 2014. 
  72. ^ "Paul Mayhue (D)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 7, 2014. 
  73. ^ "Poll: Amash's lead over Miles in 3rd District slimmer". WZZM. October 21, 2010. Retrieved January 7, 2014. 
  74. ^ "New Poll Shows Amash with Strong Lead as Election Nears". Justin Amash for Congress. October 25, 2010. Archived from the original on October 28, 2010. Retrieved January 7, 2014. 
  75. ^ "Michigan 3rd District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved January 7, 2014. 
  76. ^ a b "3rd District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position". Michigan Department of State. March 2, 2011. Retrieved January 7, 2014. 
  77. ^ "Patrick Miles is new US prosecutor". WOOD-TV. July 9, 2012. Retrieved January 7, 2014. 
  78. ^ McMillin, Zane (November 7, 2012). "Election results: Justin Amash bests Steve Pestka, blasts 'extremists' in Congress for gridlock". MLive.com. Retrieved January 7, 2014. 
  79. ^ a b "3rd District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position". Michigan Department of State. October 6, 2010. Retrieved January 7, 2014. 
  80. ^ a b c "Michigan – 4th District". Roll Call. Retrieved January 7, 2014. 
  81. ^ "Michigan 4th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  82. ^ Barber, Barrie (May 17, 2010). "Camp will battle Campbell in 4th Congressional District". The Saginaw News. Retrieved January 7, 2014. 
  83. ^ Barber, Barrie (October 10, 2010). "Camp faces three challengers in re-election bid to U.S. House". The Saginaw News. Retrieved January 7, 2014. 
  84. ^ Marcello, Jeanne (August 15, 2010). "A closer look at the local vote in the Saginaw Co. Primary". Tri-County Citizen. Retrieved January 7, 2014. 
  85. ^ "Michigan District 04 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 7, 2014. 
  86. ^ "Michigan 4th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved January 7, 2014. 
  87. ^ a b "4th District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position". Michigan Department of State. March 2, 2011. Retrieved January 7, 2014. 
  88. ^ Lynch-Morin, Kathryn (November 7, 2012). "Election coverage 2012: U.S. Rep. Dave Camp hopes for collaboration, solutions in Washington". MLive.com. Retrieved January 7, 2014. 
  89. ^ a b c "Michigan – 5th District". Roll Call. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  90. ^ "Michigan 5th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  91. ^ Kinchen, Dave (August 4, 2010). "Kupiec defeats Wilson in GOP 5th District primary". miNBCnews.com. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  92. ^ Longley, Kristin (October 28, 2010). "Libertarian Michael Moon withdraws, endorses John Kupiec in 5th District congressional race". MLive.com. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  93. ^ "Michigan District 05 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  94. ^ "Rick Wilson (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  95. ^ "Scott Livingston Withers, Jr (D)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  96. ^ "Michigan 5th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  97. ^ Fund, John (October 26, 2010). "Read This Before Joining the Office Pool". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved June 6, 2014. 
  98. ^ a b "5th District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position". Michigan Department of State. March 2, 2011. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  99. ^ Thorne, Blake (November 7, 2012). "Dan Kildee (D) wins in Michigan 5th Congressional District election 2012 results". MLive.com. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  100. ^ a b "5th District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position". Michigan Department of State. October 6, 2010. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  101. ^ a b c "Michigan – 6th District". Roll Call. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  102. ^ "Michigan 6th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  103. ^ Jessup, Kathy (October 23, 2010). "Four challengers hope to unseat veteran Michigan Congressman Fred Upton in the 6th District". MLive.com. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  104. ^ Jessup, Kathy (April 15, 2010). "Conservative Republican Jack Hoogendyk to challenge Congressman Fred Upton of Michigan's 6th District in August primary". MLive.com. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  105. ^ "Rep. Upton Wins GOP Primary over Hoogendyk". myFOXDetroit.com. August 3, 2010. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  106. ^ "Michigan District 06 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  107. ^ "Jack Hoogendyk (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  108. ^ "Michigan 6th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  109. ^ a b "6th District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position". Michigan Department of State. March 2, 2011. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  110. ^ Klug, Fritz (November 7, 2012). "Congressman Fred Upton wins by lowest margin of career; takes Kalamazoo County by 11 votes". MLive.com. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  111. ^ Monacelli, Emily (July 31, 2013). "Don Cooney announces re-election bid for Kalamazoo City Commission". MLive.com. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  112. ^ "6th District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position". Michigan Department of State. October 6, 2010. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  113. ^ a b c "Michigan – 7th District". Roll Call. Retrieved January 9, 2014. 
  114. ^ "Michigan 7th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  115. ^ Gautz, Chris (August 4, 2010). "Tim Walberg won Tuesday's primary with convincing showings across seven-county congressional district". Jackson Citizen Patriot. Retrieved January 9, 2014. 
  116. ^ Gautz, Chris (October 21, 2010). "Third-party candidates in the 7th Congressional District race to debate next week". Jackson Citizen Patriot. Retrieved January 9, 2014. 
  117. ^ Gautz, Chris (August 3, 2010). "UPDATE: Tim Walberg accepts Republican nomination to face U.S. Rep. Mark Schauer in November". Jackson Citizen Patriot. Retrieved January 9, 2014. 
  118. ^ Klaft, Holly (November 22, 2011). "Mike Stahly, who plans to challenge U.S. Rep. Tim Walberg for congressional seat, will be featured speaker at Jackson Tea Party event". Jackson Citizen Patriot. Retrieved February 22, 2014. 
  119. ^ Demas, Susan J. (April 24, 2009). "Republicans not rallying 'round Tim Walberg". MLive.com. Retrieved February 22, 2014. 
  120. ^ Wheeler, Brian (July 26, 2010). "Poll says Tim Walberg holds big lead over Brian Rooney in 7th Congressional District primary". MLive.com. Retrieved January 10, 2014. 
  121. ^ "Michigan District 07 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 9, 2014. 
  122. ^ "Marvin Carlson (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 9, 2014. 
  123. ^ "Brian John Rooney (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 9, 2014. 
  124. ^ Blake, Aaron (January 18, 2010). "Schauer is latest Dem to trail in early poll". The Hill. Retrieved January 10, 2014. 
  125. ^ Thomas, Pat (August 27, 2010). "Republican Poll Shows Walberg Ahead Of Schauer". Sheboygan's Country B93. Retrieved January 10, 2014. 
  126. ^ Spangler, Todd (September 23, 2010). "Poll: Walberg holds slim lead over Schauer". Detroit Free Press. Archived from the original on September 26, 2010. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  127. ^ Wheeler, Brian (September 23, 2010). "U.S. Rep. Mark Schauer has four-point lead over Tim Walberg in internal poll, campaign says". MLive.com. Retrieved January 10, 2014. 
  128. ^ D'Aprile, Shane (October 6, 2010). "District by district - Michigan". The Hill. Archived from the original on October 9, 2010. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  129. ^ Myers, Andrew (October 5, 2010). "Memorandum". Myers Research & Strategic Services. Archived from the original on October 8, 2010. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  130. ^ a b Spangler, Todd (October 20, 2010). "Poll: Dems ahead in 2 key congressional districts". Detroit Free Press. Archived from the original on October 23, 2010. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  131. ^ "6 News Poll: Schauer Leads 7th District Race". 6 News. October 27, 2010. Archived from the original on October 30, 2010. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  132. ^ Gautz, Chris (October 28, 2010). "Dueling polls in 7th District race provide sharply different outlook on race". Jackson Citizen Patriot. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  133. ^ "Michigan 7th District". The New York Times. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  134. ^ a b "7th District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position". Michigan Department of State. March 2, 2011. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  135. ^ Mulcahy, John (November 7, 2012). "Walberg wins re-election to Congress". The Daily Telegram. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  136. ^ Schultheis, Emily (May 28, 2013). "Michigan governor race 2014: Former Rep. Mark Schauer challenges Gov. Rick Snyder". Politico. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  137. ^ "7th District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position". Michigan Department of State. October 6, 2010. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  138. ^ a b c "Michigan – 8th District". Roll Call. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  139. ^ "Michigan 8th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  140. ^ Fitzgerald, Rick (February 23, 2009). "Mike Rogers says he won't run for governor in 2010". MLive.com. Retrieved January 16, 2014. 
  141. ^ a b "East Lansing Democrat Lance Enderle running against a name only in race for Congress in Michigan's 8th District". MLive.com. July 21, 2010. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  142. ^ "Mike Rogers to Run Unopposed in November Election?". myFOXDetroit.com. June 2, 2010. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  143. ^ "Michigan District 08 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  144. ^ "Kande Ngalamulume (D)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  145. ^ "Michigan 8th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  146. ^ a b "8th District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position". Michigan Department of State. March 2, 2011. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  147. ^ Krawcke, Nicole (November 7, 2012). "Mike Rogers Re-Elected in the U.S. 8th Congressional District". Brighton Patch. Retrieved January 16, 2014. 
  148. ^ a b c "Michigan – 9th District". Roll Call. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  149. ^ "Michigan 9th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  150. ^ Kraushaar, Josh (January 6, 2010). "Peters not running in Mich. governor's race". Politico. Retrieved February 22, 2014. 
  151. ^ a b "Michigan election results". 6abc.com. August 4, 2010. Retrieved January 12, 2014. 
  152. ^ Zaniewski, Ann (April 10, 2012). "UPDATE: Peters knocks out Rocky in U.S House race". Daily Tribune. Retrieved January 12, 2014. 
  153. ^ Foley, Aaron (May 3, 2010). "Republican challenger Gene Goodman drops out of race to unseat Rep. Gary Peters". MLive.com. Retrieved January 12, 2014. 
  154. ^ "Welday Tripper". National Journal. April 12, 2010. Retrieved February 22, 2014. 
  155. ^ "Metamorphic Rocky". National Journal. May 7, 2010. Retrieved February 22, 2014. 
  156. ^ "Michigan District 09 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 12, 2014. 
  157. ^ "Richard D. Kuhn (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 12, 2014. 
  158. ^ "Paul F. Welday (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 12, 2014. 
  159. ^ "Gene Goodman (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 12, 2014. 
  160. ^ Oosting, Jonathan (September 16, 2010). "Poll: Challenger Rocky Raczkowski holds slim lead over Rep. Gary Peters in closely-watched race". MLive.com. Retrieved January 12, 2014. 
  161. ^ Geraghty, Jim (October 29, 2010). "There's Still Some Fight Left in This Rocky". National Review. Retrieved January 12, 2014. 
  162. ^ "Michigan 9th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved January 13, 2014. 
  163. ^ a b "9th District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position Files In OAKLAND County". Michigan Department of State. March 2, 2011. Retrieved January 13, 2014. 
  164. ^ a b AlHajal, Khalil (November 6, 2012). "U.S. Rep. Gary Peters declares victory in 14th District election". MLive.com. Retrieved January 13, 2014. 
  165. ^ Sullivan, Sean (May 1, 2013). "Gary Peters announces Michigan Senate campaign". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 13, 2014. 
  166. ^ "9th District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position Files In OAKLAND County". Michigan Department of State. October 6, 2010. Retrieved January 13, 2014. 
  167. ^ a b c "Michigan – 10th District". Roll Call. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  168. ^ "Michigan 10th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  169. ^ "Macomb County's Candice Miller wins 5th term in U.S. House of Representatives". MLive.com. November 2, 2010. Retrieved January 14, 2014. 
  170. ^ "Candidates vie for seats in state, county, local elections". Source Newspapers. October 22, 2010. Retrieved January 14, 2014. 
  171. ^ Hessling, Kate (August 4, 2010). "Green, Muxlow win Republican primary". Huron Daily Tribune. Retrieved January 14, 2014. 
  172. ^ "Michigan District 01 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 14, 2014. 
  173. ^ "Michigan 10th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved January 14, 2014. 
  174. ^ a b "10th District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position". Michigan Department of State. March 2, 2011. Retrieved January 14, 2014. 
  175. ^ "St. Clair County Overall Election Information". myFOXchicago.com. November 7, 2012. Retrieved January 14, 2014. 
  176. ^ a b c "Michigan – 11th District". Roll Call. Retrieved January 14, 2014. 
  177. ^ "Michigan 11th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  178. ^ "U.S. Rep. Thad McCotter of Livonia wins 5th term". MLive.com. November 3, 2010. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  179. ^ Foley, Aaron (August 4, 2010). "Oakland County election results: First-term U.S. Rep. Gary Peters faces Rocky Raczkowski, more". MLive.com. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  180. ^ Kraushaar, Josh (March 4, 2009). "McCotter dodges a bullet". Politico. Retrieved February 22, 2014. 
  181. ^ "Michigan District 11 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  182. ^ "Michigan 11th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  183. ^ a b "11th District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position". Michigan Department of State. March 2, 2011. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  184. ^ Yadron, Danny (July 1, 2011). "Michigan GOP Rep. McCotter Unveils Presidential Bid". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  185. ^ Falcone, Michael (September 22, 2011). "Thad McCotter Ends Presidential Bid, Endorses Mitt Romney". ABC News. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  186. ^ Blake, Aaron (July 6, 2012). "Thaddeus McCotter unexpectedly resigns from Congress". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  187. ^ Kim, Seung Min (December 4, 2012). "Rep. Dave Curson: The 7-week congressman". Politico. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  188. ^ "Two Dems announce intent to run for Slavens' seat in 2014". Belleville Lake Current. September 5, 2013. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  189. ^ a b c "Michigan – 12th District". Roll Call. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  190. ^ "Michigan 12th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  191. ^ Foley, Aaron (August 4, 2010). "Macomb County election results: Sander Levin holds on, will face challenger in November". MLive.com. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  192. ^ Toeplitz, Shira (March 24, 2009). "Michigan: Levin Releases Poll on Heels of Primary News". Roll Call. Retrieved February 23, 2014. 
  193. ^ "Michigan District 12 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  194. ^ "Mickey Switalski (D)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  195. ^ "Michigan 12th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  196. ^ a b "12th District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position". Michigan Department of State. March 2, 2011. Retrieved January 16, 2014. 
  197. ^ Proxmire, C. (November 7, 2012). "Election Results are In". The Ferndale One~Fifteen News. Retrieved January 16, 2014. 
  198. ^ "12th District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position". Michigan Department of State. October 6, 2010. Retrieved January 16, 2014. 
  199. ^ a b "Michigan – 13th District". Roll Call. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  200. ^ "Michigan 13th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  201. ^ Kim, Mallie Jane. "7 Incumbents Ousted in Primary Season". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  202. ^ Gray, Kathleen; Christoff, Chris; Campbell, Bob; Bell, Dawson (June 20, 2010). "Small poll bears some big news for Clarke". Detroit Free Press. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  203. ^ Gray, Kathleen (July 16, 2010). "Hansen Clarke's poll shows he is ahead of Carolyn Cheeks Kilpatrick". Detroit Free Press. Archived from the original on July 19, 2010. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  204. ^ Foley, Aaron (July 16, 2010). "Reports: Hansen Clarke edging out Carolyn Cheeks Kilpatrick in two polls". MLive.com. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  205. ^ "Carolyn Cheeks Kilpatrick". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  206. ^ "Michigan District 13". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  207. ^ "John W. Broad (D)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  208. ^ "Glenn Rodney Plummer (D)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  209. ^ "Michigan 13th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  210. ^ a b "13th District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position Files In WAYNE County". Michigan Department of State. March 2, 2011. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  211. ^ Toeplitz, Shira (August 7, 2012). "Michigan: Gary Peters Prevails Over Hansen Clarke in Democratic Primary". Roll Call. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  212. ^ "13th District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position Files In WAYNE County". Michigan Department of State. October 6, 2010. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  213. ^ a b c "Michigan – 14th District". Roll Call. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  214. ^ "Michigan 14th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  215. ^ a b Jackett, Chris (August 7, 2010). "Commission votes close in primary". Downriver Sunday Times. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  216. ^ "Michigan District 14 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  217. ^ "Michigan 14th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  218. ^ a b "14th District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position Files In WAYNE County". Michigan Department of State. March 2, 2011. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  219. ^ "Democratic Rep. Conyers Wins 25th Consecutive Term". CBS Detroit. November 6, 2012. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  220. ^ "14th District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position Files In WAYNE County". Michigan Department of State. October 6, 2010. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  221. ^ a b c "Michigan – 15th District". Roll Call. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  222. ^ "Michigan 15th District Profile". The New York Times. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  223. ^ "Michigan District 15 Race". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  224. ^ "Tony Amorose (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  225. ^ "John Lynch (R)". Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  226. ^ Oosting, Jonathan (September 20, 2010). "Poll: John Dingell leads challenger by 19 points despite 'some concern' by Michigan Democrats". MLive.com. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  227. ^ Gray, Kathleen (October 8, 2010). "Poll: In House race, Rob Steele leads John Dingell by 4 points". Detroit Free Press. Archived from the original on October 11, 2010. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  228. ^ Spangler, Todd; Gray, Kathleen (October 22, 2010). "Poll shows Dingell leading newcomer". Detroit Free Press. Archived from the original on October 28, 2010. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  229. ^ "Michigan 15th District". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  230. ^ a b "15th District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position". Michigan Department of State. March 2, 2011. 
  231. ^ "Stabenow re-elected to U.S. Senate; Bentivolio, Conyers, Dingell win in House". Crain's Detroit Business. November 7, 2012. Retrieved January 18, 2014. 
  232. ^ "15th District Representative in Congress 2 Year Term (1) Position". Michigan Department of State. October 6, 2010. Retrieved January 18, 2014.