Baldwin, Nassau County, New York

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Baldwin, New York
Location in Nassau County and the state of New York
Location in Nassau County and the state of New York
Baldwin, New York is located in New York
Baldwin, New York
Baldwin, New York
Location in Nassau County and the state of New York
Coordinates: 40°40′12.8″N 73°36′45″W / 40.670222°N 73.61250°W / 40.670222; -73.61250Coordinates: 40°40′12.8″N 73°36′45″W / 40.670222°N 73.61250°W / 40.670222; -73.61250
Country United States
State New York
CountyNassau
Elevation
7.0104 m (23 ft)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total24,033
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
11510
Area code(s)516
GNIS feature ID942888
Websitehttp://www.baldwinchamber.com
U.S. Census map

Baldwin is a hamlet and census-designated place (CDP) located in the town of Hempstead in Nassau County, New York, United States. The population was 24,033 at the 2010 census.[1]

Baldwin LIRR station, originally built in 1868, is on the Babylon Branch of the Long Island Rail Road.

History[edit]

Original inhabitants of the area between Parsonage Creek near Oceanside and Milburn Creek near Freeport were Native Americans known as the Meroke, or Merrick, a band of Lenape people who were indigenous to most of the South Shore of Long Island. They spoke an Algonquian language and lived in two villages along Milburn Creek.[2]

In 1643, English colonists began to call this area Hick's Neck, after two of Hempstead's early settlers, John Spragg from England and John Hicks from Flushing. They extended Hempstead village south to the salt meadows. The grist mill built by John Pine in 1686 on Milburn Creek attracted more English settlers.[3] They engaged in fishing, farming, marshing, raising longwood, and breeding and raising sheep. Between the American Revolutionary War and the War of 1812, Hick's Neck continued to grow, becoming a prosperous agricultural area.[4]

The first churches were built in 1810 and 1872, and the first school was built in 1813.[5]

Sometime around the early 19th century Hick's Neck had begun to be called the village of Milburn; the first documented use of the name Milburn was in 1839.[4] In 1855, the village was officially founded as Baldwinsville, named in honor of Thomas Baldwin (1795–1872), a sixth-generation member of the Baldwin family of Hempstead and the leading merchant of Milburn at the time. Baldwin owned a general store named T. Baldwin and Sons. He also had a hotel at what would now be considered the northwest corner of Merrick Road and Grand Avenue. A third enterprise was his sawmill, which he operated by Silver Lake just southeast of the hotel.[6]

In 1867, the South Side Rail Road began operating with a station in Baldwinsville. In 1870, one of Thomas Baldwin's sons, Francis Baldwin, became a member of the New York State Assembly representing Queens County's 2nd District; he later served as the Queens County treasurer.[5] (During this time, Baldwinsville was part of Queens County.) A year later, the name of the village was changed from Baldwinsville to Baldwins by the U.S. Postal Service so as to not confuse it with the village of Baldwinsville in upstate New York. By 1892, by an act of local government, the village was officially named Baldwin.[6]

Shortly after Hempstead separated from Queens County in 1899, people began to move to "Beautiful Baldwin", as it was called by Charles Luerssen, a village realtor. The village had fine boating (sailboats), bathing, and fishing. By 1939, ten years after the opening of Sunrise Highway, Baldwin became the largest unincorporated village in New York State—a title that was lost to Levittown by 1960.[6]

In the 1990 US Census, the area south of Atlantic Avenue was designated as Baldwin Harbor, a hamlet (and census-designated place). Baldwin Harbor remains a part of the Town of Baldwin's ZIP code, school district, and library system.

In May 1910, a breakthrough in American aviation history was made in Baldwin. The first all-American monoplane was designed, built, and successfully flown at this location by brothers Arthur and Albert Heinrich. The project was developed at the site now occupied by the Plaza Elementary School on Seaman Avenue and Rockville Drive. In the plane's initial and subsequent models, its unique designs featured controls that were combined into one stick, which allowed the pilot to fly the plane using one hand.

Geography[edit]

The community is located in the southwest part of Nassau County. It is located on what is known as the South Shore of Long Island.

Baldwin is located at 40°39′48″N 73°36′38″W / 40.66333°N 73.61056°W / 40.66333; -73.61056 (40.663346, -73.610618).[7]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 3.0 square miles (7.8 km2), of which 0.34% is water. The climate is borderline between a hot-summer humid continental climate (Dfa) and a humid subtropical climate (Cfa.) Average monthly temperatures in the village centre range from 31.9° F in January to 74.8° F in July. [1] The local hardiness zone is 7b.

Demographics[edit]

There were 1,200 people in the community of Baldwin in 1882,[8] 1,500 in 1890, 5,000 in 1920,[8] 12,000 in 1930, 15,000 in 1940, and 31,630 in 1980.[9]

2010 Census[edit]

As of the census[10][11] of 2010, there were 23,455 people, 7,868 households, and 6,081 families residing in the village. The population density was 7,954.4 per square mile (3,069.8/km2). There were 7,999 housing units at an average density of 2,712.8/sq mi (1,046.9/km2). The racial makeup of the CDP was 39.8% Non-Hispanic White, 34.6% African American, 20.2% Hispanic or Latino, 4.2% Asian, 0.2% Native American, 0.02% Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander, 8.2% from other races, and 3.9% from two or more races.[12]

There were 7,868 households, out of which 38.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.0% were married couples living together, 12.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.7% were non-families. 18.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.98 and the average family size was 3.40.

In the community, the population was spread out, with 26.1% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 30.5% from 25 to 44, 24.1% from 45 to 64, and 12.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 89.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.2 males.

The median income for a household in the community was $72,456, and the median income for a family was $79,400. Males had a median income of $52,069 versus $41,496 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $29,114. About 1.1% of families and 1.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.5% of those under the age of 18, and 2.1% of those aged 65 or over.

2000 Census[edit]

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 23,455 people, 7,868 households, and 6,081 families residing in the village. The population density was 7,954.4 per square mile (3,069.8/km2). There were 7,999 housing units at an average density of 2,712.8/sq mi (1,046.9/km2). The racial makeup of the CDP was 67.3% White, 17.9% African American, 10.6% Hispanic or Latino, 1.1% Asian, 0.8% Native American, 0.3% Pacific Islander, 4.60% from other races, and 3.03% from two or more races.

There were 7,868 households, out of which 38.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.0% were married couples living together, 12.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.7% were non-families. 18.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.98 and the average family size was 3.40.

In the community, the population was spread out, with 26.1% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 30.5% from 25 to 44, 24.1% from 45 to 64, and 12.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 89.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.2 males.

The median income for a household in the community was $71,456, and the median income for a family was $78,400. Males had a median income of $51,069 versus $40,496 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $28,114. About 3.3% of families and 5.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.5% of those under the age of 18, and 7.1% of those aged 65 or over.

School system[edit]

Baldwin, including Baldwin Harbor, has its own school district, officially named the Baldwin Union Free School District (formerly Union Free School District No. 10, Town of Hempstead). The boundaries of the Baldwin School District are not identical with those of Baldwin itself, also containing the Stearns Park neighborhood of Freeport, up to Knollwood Road in Rockville Centre (which is a few blocks away from South Side High School) and a few blocks from other neighboring villages. A small portion of Baldwin, located to the West of Silver Lake, is included in the Oceanside Union Free School District.

As of September 2020, the Baldwin Public Schools consist of seven schools with a total enrollment of approximately 4500 students. There is one high school, Baldwin High School, and one middle school, Baldwin Middle School. There are five elementary schools spaced throughout the town: Brookside, Lenox, Meadow, Plaza, and Steele. There is also a career and technical education program, a collaboration between Baldwin Union Free School District, Simon Youth Foundation, and Nassau BOCES, called Baldwin High School@Shubert. Baldwin UFSD has received countless recognition for its innovative and rigorous academic programs, redesigned classrooms modeled after real-world work spaces as well as its overall focus on helping every student achieve college-, career-, and life-readiness.

Baldwin High School is a nationally recognized "School of Excellence," and as of 2011, is the eighth-largest high school in Nassau County, New York.[13] In 2020, Baldwin High School was ranked #383 by U.S. News & World Report among the top high schools in the nation. The school was also designated a Recognition School for 2019-2020 and 2018-2019 by the New York State Education Department. Baldwin High School offers a multitude of extracurricular clubs, varsity sports, a robotics team, and a unique school-to-career program called the Academic Academies. The robust curriculum features an array of coursework unique to the district, such as a drone class, where students become FAA certified as a remote pilot. Baldwin Senior High School offers Advanced Placement and college-level courses that enable students to earn college credit, including a partnership with Suffolk County Community College, where students take classes directly on the campus. In addition, the district has been named a Best Community for Music Education multiple times by the National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) Foundation. Students in music have performed at countless public events and venues, including Carnegie Hall in New York City. Baldwin students are regularly invited to the All-State Festival and named Long Island Scholar-Artists. The young artists' work can be seen in the Art Supervisor's Association All county Art Exhibition, the Long Island Media Art Exhibit, Northwell Health hospitals, as well as several other venues. Most recently, the district hosted a “Projection Mapping” event that showcased student-produced work in the areas of fine arts and English language arts on the district’s building exteriors.

Additionally, the elementary schools and middle school offer a variety of award-winning programs and curricula, including "Better World Days," Team ORCHID - student-drive journalism club - and partnerships with Seatuck Environmental Association and Cornell Cooperative Extension as part of the district's unique K-5 science curriculum, which was designed by a scientist. The district’s graduation rate is currently 97%, and the administration, faculty, staff and students live by the district motto: “We are innovative. We are inclusive. We are involved. We are Baldwin.”

The high school is located near the north-central part of town, and the middle school near the south end. Buses are run to both of these schools. Most students are able to walk to their elementary schools. The elementary schools contain kindergarten to fifth grade. The middle school contains grades six through eight—but the sixth graders spend most of their time in a separate wing except for music, gym, lunch, arts, computers, technology, and language. The high school contains grades nine through twelve.

Three former elementary schools were closed in June 1980: Prospect School was torn down, along with the former Baldwin Junior High School and former Baldwin Senior High School which were combined in one building in the 1980s to make way for a housing complex; Coolidge School on Grand Avenue has been converted to condominiums; Harbor Elementary School on Hastings Street is now the school district office building. Two additional elementary schools, Milburn and Shubert, were closed in June 2012 as the result of enrollment changes and cuts in state funding.

The district is governed by a five-member elected board of education. Ms. Mary Jo O’Hagan, the current board president and a board member for more than 25 years, was named the 2019 winner of the New York State School Boards Association’s (NYSSBA) highest honor, Everett R. Dyer Award for Distinguished School Board Service. Dr. Shari L. Camhi is the superintendent of schools and was recognized by Education Week as a 2020 "Leader To Learn From." She has also been elected as the 2021-2022 president-elect and 2022-2023 president of The School Superintendents Association (AASA), a national organization serving more than 13,000 educational leaders across the country.

Baldwin also has one Catholic school, St. Christopher's. This school was established in 1925 as part of St. Christopher's parish. The school serves students from Baldwin, Freeport, and surrounding areas, and it ranges from kindergarten to eighth grade. Although originally staffed by the Sisters of St. Joseph of Brentwood, most of the school's faculty consists of lay people. Originally the school was one building that housed all classes, however it has been expanded twice. The school now consists of the "original building" (now housing classrooms, a gym, stage, computer lab, and music room), the "middle building" (housing the school and religious education offices, classrooms and an art room), and the "new building" (housing a cafeteria, library, and classrooms). Over the years the school has gained a highly regarded reputation in the Baldwin community. Students from the school participate in a wide variety of both Catholic and community events. For example, students take religion classes from kindergarten to the eighth grade, as well as march in the Baldwin Memorial Day Parade and help out at Baldwin's Big Sweep (a community event in which volunteers clean up Grand Avenue).

Notable people[edit]

The soldiers who were posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor:

First Lieutenant Bernard J. Ray deliberately gave his life to spare his men of Company F, 8th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division on November 17, 1944 in the Hurtgen Forest.

Specialist Five John J. Kedenburg (BHS '64) was serving with a long-range reconnaissance team of South Vietnamese irregular troops while a member of the U.S. Army 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne). When his group came under attack and was encircled by a battalion-size North Vietnamese Army force, Kedenberg conducted a rear-guard action which allowed his group to break out of their encirclement and move to a landing zone. While in the landing zone, Kedenberg directed the defense of the L-Z and ultimately gave up the last chance of evacuation to one of his Vietnamese comrades.

Recreation[edit]

Baldwin is home to many public parks, including Baldwin Park, Coes Neck Park, Baldwin Skate Park (located within Baldwin Park), Lofts Pond Park, and Silver Lake Park which is in Oceanside also. Baldwin Park, located at the southern terminus of Grand Avenue in Baldwin Harbor, is run by the Town of Hempstead, and offers a multitude of recreational facilities, including basketball, handball, paddleball, tennis, volleyball, spray pool, soccer, softball, baseball, playground, game tables, play equipment, sitting area, shuffleboard, bike paths, roller rink and Baldwin Skate Park.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Race, Hispanic or Latino, Age, and Housing Occupancy: 2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File (QT-PL), Baldwin CDP, New York". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 4, 2011.
  2. ^ "Hick's Neck: The Story of Baldwin – 1. The Birth of Baldwin Archived 2007-11-24 at the Wayback Machine". Baldwin Fire Department. baldwinfd.com. Retrieved 2018-07-27.
  3. ^ "Hick's Neck: The Story of Baldwin – 2. From Settlement to Revolution Archived 2016-05-06 at the Wayback Machine". Baldwin Fire Department. baldwinfd.com. Retrieved 2018-07-26.
  4. ^ a b "Hick's Neck: The Story of Baldwin – 3. Into the 1800s, part I Archived 2018-07-27 at the Wayback Machine". Baldwin Fire Department. baldwinfd.com. Retrieved 2018-07-27.
  5. ^ a b "Baldwin History". Baldwin Public Library. June 16, 2011. Section, "The History of Your Home Town by Helen MacDonough". Archived from the original on 2015-07-11. Retrieved 2018-07-25.
  6. ^ a b c Baldwin Chamber of Commerce: History and Mission Statement Archived 2012-09-02 at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  8. ^ a b "Hick's Neck: The Story of Baldwin – 4. Into the 1800s, part II Archived 2011-07-07 at the Wayback Machine". Baldwin Fire Department. baldwinfd.com. Retrieved 2018-07-26.
  9. ^ "Hick's Neck: The Story of Baldwin – 5. 1900 to the Present Archived 2011-07-07 at the Wayback Machine". Baldwin Fire Department. baldwinfd.com. Retrieved 2018-07-26.
  10. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  11. ^ Data Access and Dissemination Systems (DADS). "U.S. Census website". census.gov. Retrieved 7 March 2015.
  12. ^ "Baldwin, New York (NY) profile". city-data.com.
  13. ^ Baldwin UFSD Website
  14. ^ "Chris Weidman UFC Bio". Retrieved 2014-01-01.
  15. ^ Lyall, Sarah (July 18, 1993). "'Amongst Friends' Tops Off a Journey Of Self-Discovery". The New York Times. p. 10. Retrieved September 18, 2008.

External links[edit]