Boogie Nights (soundtrack)

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Boogie Nights: Music from the Original Motion Picture
Boogie Nights OST 1.JPG
Soundtrack album
Released October 7, 1997
Genre Disco, pop, soul
Label Capitol
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4.5/5 stars[1]

The original motion picture soundtrack to the 1997 film Boogie Nights is a two-disc set released between the end of that same year and the beginning of the next year.

The first soundtrack album, Boogie Nights: Music from the Original Motion Picture, was released October 7, 1997 in the United States. Boogie Nights 2: More Music from the Original Motion Picture, was released January 13, 1998.

Boogie Nights: Music from the Original Motion Picture[edit]

Source: [2]

No. Title Original artist Length
1. "Intro (Feel the Heat)"   John C. Reilly and Mark Wahlberg 1:11
2. "Best of My Love"   The Emotions 3:39
3. "Jungle Fever"   The Chakachas 4:20
4. "Brand New Key"   Melanie 2:23
5. "Spill the Wine"   Eric Burdon and War 4:02
6. "Got to Give It Up (Part 1)"   Marvin Gaye 4:07
7. "Machine Gun"   The Commodores 2:38
8. "Magnet and Steel"   Walter Egan 3:23
9. "Ain't No Stoppin' Us Now"   McFadden & Whitehead 3:40
10. "Sister Christian"   Night Ranger 5:00
11. "Livin' Thing"   Electric Light Orchestra 3:30
12. "God Only Knows"   The Beach Boys 2:48
13. "The Big Top (Theme from Boogie Nights)"   Michael Penn & Patrick Warren 9:58
14. "The Touch" (Hidden[3]) Mark Wahlberg  

Boogie Nights 2: More Music from the Original Motion Picture[edit]

Boogie Nights 2: More Music from the Original Motion Picture
Boogie nights soundtrack vol. 2.JPG
Soundtrack album
Released January 13, 1998
Genre Disco, pop, soul
Label Capitol
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4/5 stars link

Source: [4]

No. Title Original artist Length
1. "Mama Told Me (Not to Come)"   Three Dog Night 3:16
2. "Fooled Around and Fell in Love"   Elvin Bishop 4:34
3. "You Sexy Thing"   Hot Chocolate 4:02
4. "Boogie Shoes"   K.C. & The Sunshine Band 2:09
5. "Do Your Thing"   Charles Wright & The Watts 103rd Street Rhythm Band 3:29
6. "Driver's Seat"   Sniff 'n' the Tears 4:00
7. "Feel Too Good"   The Move 9:30
8. "Jessie's Girl"   Rick Springfield 3:13
9. "J.P. Walk"   Sound Experience 7:05
10. "I Want to Be Free"   Ohio Players 6:50
11. "Joy"   Apollo 100 2:45

Personnel[edit]

  • Paul Thomas Anderson – executive producer
  • Karyn Rachtman – executive producer, music supervisor
  • Liz Heller – executive producer[5]
  • Bobby Lavelle – music supervisor
  • Carol Dunn – music coordinator

Songs featured in the film but not on these soundtracks[edit]

  • Boney M.’s “Sunny” can be heard at the opening gathering at Hot Traxx
  • Silver Convention’s “Fly, Robin, Fly” comes on when Jack is talking to Eddie in the back room at Hot Traxx
  • The song Jack Horner plays in his living room after escorting Amber home from Hot Traxx is “The Sage” by the Chico Hamilton Quintet
  • Buck demonstrates the power of the TK-421 with the country-western song “Off the Road” by Richard Gilka
  • Andrew Gold's "Lonely Boy" was played during the first party scene at Jack's house when Amber's son calls and Maurice answers the phone.
  • The documentary that Amber Waves directs for Dirk Diggler is scored by two songs, “Disco Fever” and “Flying Objects,” composed by interstitial music cult hero Roger Webb
  • Roberta Flack’s “Compared to What” scores the bummer montage in which Buck is turned down for a loan, Amber and Roller Girl slip into an abyss of cocaine psychosis, and Dirk and Reed can’t get the tapes
  • Nena (band)'s "99 Luftballons" is featured as the conclusion to the Rahad Jackson sequence
  • An instrumental version of Jethro Tull’s “Fat Man” from their album Stand Up recurs throughout, most notably as Dirk runs from the botched drug deal at Rahad’s house
  • ’Til Tuesday’s “Voices Carry” plays on Roller Girl’s Walkman for a quick moment at the end of the movie
  • Juice Newton’s “Queen of Hearts” is heard during the scene where the Colonel calls Jack from prison.
  • Starland Vocal Band’s “Afternoon Delight
  • Brook Benton’s “It’s Just a Matter of Time” is heard during Becky and Jerome's wedding reception.[6]

References[edit]