Curaçao national football team

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This article is about the Curaçao national team established in 2011. For the (Territory of) Curaçao national football team (prior to 1958), see Territory of Curaçao national football team. For the Netherlands Antilles national football team (1958–2010), see Netherlands Antilles national football team.
Curaçao
Shirt badge/Association crest
Association FFK
Confederation CONCACAF
Sub-confederation CFU (Caribbean)
Head coach Vacant
Captain Cuco Martina
Most caps Cuco Martina (25)
Top scorer Felitciano Zschusschen (7)
Home stadium Stadion Ergilio Hato
FIFA code CUW
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 134 Increase 20 (14 July 2016)
Highest 134 (July 2016)
Lowest 183 (April 2013, July 2014)
Elo ranking
Current 173
Highest 41 (March 1963)
Lowest 188 (October 2012)
First international
Aruba 0–4 Curaçao
(Aruba, 6 April 1924)
 Dominican Republic 1–0 Curaçao 
(Dominican Republic, 18 August 2011)
Biggest win
Curaçao 14–0 Puerto Rico 
(Colombia, 21 December 1948)
Biggest defeat
 Netherlands 8–1 Curaçao
(Netherlands, 23 April 1948)
CONCACAF Championship
& Gold Cup
Appearances 4
Best result Third, 1963, 1969

The Curaçao national football team (Dutch: Curaçaos voetbalelftal) represents Curaçao in International association football and is controlled by the Curaçao Football Federation.

History[edit]

The first national football team to bear the name Curaçao was the Territory of Curaçao national football team, which made its debut in 1924 in an away match against neighboring Aruba, a match which the Territory of Curaçao won four to nil.

In December 1954, the territory of Curaçao became the Netherlands Antilles, and following a constitutional change the Netherlands Antilles were designated a country within the Kingdom of the Netherlands, which included the islands of Aruba, Bonaire, Saba, Sint Eustatius and Sint Maarten. The name of the Curaçao team also changed its name to Netherlands Antilles national team, representing all six islands.

In 1986, Aruba became a country within the Kingdom in its own right, with its own Aruba national football team and subsequently Aruban players did not longer represent the Netherlands Antilles.

On 10 October 2010, the Netherlands Antilles were dissolved, and Curaçao and Sint Maarten became countries in their own right, while Bonaire, Saba and Sint Eustatius became part of the Netherlands proper. Although not a sovereign state, Curaçao (the largest island territory in the Netherlands Antilles) appeared on the FIFA member list in March 2011, as successor of the Netherlands Antilles.

As well as taking on the Netherlands Antilles' FIFA membership, Curaçao was recognised as the direct successor of the former (similarly to how Serbia is regarded the direct successor of Yugoslavia, and Russia for the Soviet Union), and took on its historical records and FIFA ranking.

They played their first match as the newly formed Curaçao national team on 20 August 2011 against Dominican Republic at the Estadio Panamericano, with the match ending in a 1–0 loss for Curaçao.

During the CONCACAF Qualification for the 2018 FIFA World Cup, Curaçao achieved a major feat when they defeated Cuba 1-1 with the away goals rule.

Competitive record[edit]

All competitive matches played from 1921-1958 were contested as the Territory of Curaçao (comprising all six islands of the Netherlands Antilles). From 1958-2010 all matches were contested as the Netherlands Antilles, successor of the Territory of Curaçao, (still comprising six islands until 1986, when Aruba seceded). All competitive fixtures after 2010 were contested by Curaçao, which solely consists of the island nation itself. Under the newly formed governing body, Curaçao has so far only competed in the 2014 FIFA World Cup qualifying, the 2012 Caribbean Cup qualification, the 2014 Caribbean Cup qualification as well as the ABCS Tournament.

CFU Caribbean Cup[edit]

CFU Caribbean Cup
Year Round GP W D[1] L GS GA
Barbados 1989 Fourth place 2 0 2 0 2 2
Trinidad and Tobago 1990 Did not qualify - - - - - -
Jamaica 1991 Did not enter - - - - - -
Trinidad and Tobago 1992 Did not qualify - - - - - -
Jamaica 1993 Withdrew - - - - - -
Trinidad and Tobago 1994 Did not enter - - - - - -
1995-1997 Did not qualify - - - - - -
Trinidad and Tobago Jamaica 1998 Group stage 3 0 0 3 2 9
Trinidad and Tobago 1999 Did not qualify - - - - - -
Trinidad and Tobago 2001 Did not enter - - - - - -
Barbados 2005 Withdrew - - - - - -
2007-2012 Did not qualify - - - - - -
Jamaica 2014 Group stage 3 0 0 3 5 10
United States Virgin Islands 2017 To be determined
Total Fourth place 8 0 2 6 9 21
  1. ^ Draws include knockout matches decided on a penalty shootout.

CONCACAF Gold Cup[edit]

CONCACAF Championship & CONCACAF Gold Cup
Year Round GP W D* L GS GA
El Salvador 1963 Third Place 8 5 0 3 14 9
Guatemala 1965 Fifth Place 5 0 2 3 4 16
Honduras 1967 Group Stage 4 0 2 2 4 6
Costa Rica 1969 Third Place 5 2 1 2 9 12
Trinidad and Tobago 1971 Did not enter
Haiti 1973 Sixth Place 5 0 2 3 4 19
Mexico 1977 to United States 1991 Did not qualify
United StatesMexico 1993 Did not enter
United States 1996 to United States 2000 Did not qualify
United States 2002 Did not enter
United StatesMexico 2003 Did not qualify
United States 2005 Withdrew
United States 2007 to United States Canada 2015 Did not qualify
Total Third Place 27 7 7 13 39 62

FIFA World Cup[edit]