Eastampton Township, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Eastampton Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Eastampton
Eastampton Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Eastampton Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Eastampton Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Eastampton Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°00′11″N 74°45′26″W / 40.003011°N 74.757322°W / 40.003011; -74.757322Coordinates: 40°00′11″N 74°45′26″W / 40.003011°N 74.757322°W / 40.003011; -74.757322[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Burlington
Incorporated February 11, 1880
Government[7]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Council-Manager)
 • Body Township Council
 • Mayor Anthony Zeno (term ends December 31, 2015)[3][4]
 • Manager Thomas Czerniecki[5]
 • Clerk Kim-Marie White[6]
Area[1]
 • Total 5.834 sq mi (15.111 km2)
 • Land 5.749 sq mi (14.891 km2)
 • Water 0.085 sq mi (0.220 km2)  1.46%
Area rank 262nd of 566 in state
26th of 40 in county[1]
Elevation[8] 46 ft (14 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total 6,069
 • Estimate (2014)[12] 6,049
 • Rank 343rd of 566 in state
28th of 40 in county[13]
 • Density 1,055.6/sq mi (407.6/km2)
 • Density rank 375th of 566 in state
23rd of 40 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08060 - Mount Holly[14]
Area code(s) 609[15]
FIPS code 3400518790[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID 0882105[1][18]
Website www.eastampton.com

Eastampton Township is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 6,069,[9][10][11] reflecting a decline of 133 (-2.1%) from the 6,202 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,240 (+25.0%) from the 4,962 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

History[edit]

Eastampton Township was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 11, 1880, from portions of Westampton Township. Portions of both Lumberton Township and Southampton Township were annexed in 1882.[20]

Eastampton is the location of Smithville, an industrial community created by Hezekiah Bradley Smith for his machine company, which produced the American Star Bicycle. It is now a county park.[21][22]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 5.834 square miles (15.111 km2), including 5.749 square miles (14.891 km2) of land and 0.085 square miles (0.220 km2) of water (1.46%).[1][2]

The township borders Mount Holly Township, Westampton Township, Springfield Township, Pemberton Township, Southampton Township, and Lumberton Township.[23]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Smithville and Turpentine.[24]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 566
1890 654 15.5%
1900 584 −10.7%
1910 508 −13.0%
1920 539 6.1%
1930 503 −6.7%
1940 498 −1.0%
1950 692 39.0%
1960 1,402 102.6%
1970 2,284 62.9%
1980 3,814 67.0%
1990 4,962 30.1%
2000 6,202 25.0%
2010 6,069 −2.1%
Est. 2014 6,049 [12][25] −0.3%
Population sources: 1880-2000[26]
1880-1920[27] 1880-1890[28]
1890-1910[29] 1850-1930[30]
1930-1990[31] 2000[32][33] 2010[9][10][11]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 6,069 people, 2,281 households, and 1,640 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,055.6 per square mile (407.6/km2). There were 2,380 housing units at an average density of 414.0 per square mile (159.8/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 73.11% (4,437) White, 16.97% (1,030) Black or African American, 0.35% (21) Native American, 4.48% (272) Asian, 0.07% (4) Pacific Islander, 1.65% (100) from other races, and 3.38% (205) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 8.29% (503) of the population.[9]

There were 2,281 households, of which 33.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.8% were married couples living together, 12.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.1% were non-families. 22.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.15.[9]

In the township, 24.5% of the population were under the age of 18, 10.1% from 18 to 24, 25.3% from 25 to 44, 31.3% from 45 to 64, and 8.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.0 years. For every 100 females there were 93.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.6 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $73,393 (with a margin of error of +/- $10,010) and the median family income was $91,375 (+/- $8,669). Males had a median income of $60,405 (+/- $4,400) versus $44,028 (+/- $8,940) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $32,065 (+/- $2,298). About 3.0% of families and 5.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.8% of those under age 18 and 3.2% of those age 65 or over.[34]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 6,202 people, 2,226 households, and 1,638 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,077.9 people per square mile (416.5/km²). There were 2,312 housing units at an average density of 401.8 per square mile (155.2/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 78.25% White, 11.77% African American, 0.23% Native American, 5.42% Asian, 1.44% from other races, and 2.90% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.72% of the population.[32][33]

There were 2,226 households out of which 42.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.2% were married couples living together, 8.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.4% were non-families. 21.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.78 and the average family size was 3.29.[32][33]

In the township the population was spread out with 29.5% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 35.3% from 25 to 44, 21.0% from 45 to 64, and 7.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 99.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.2 males.[32][33]

The median income for a household in the township was $66,406, and the median income for a family was $71,765. Males had a median income of $46,486 versus $31,208 for females. The per capita income for the township was $24,534. About 2.0% of families and 2.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.0% of those under age 18 and 4.3% of those age 65 or over.[32][33]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Eastampton Township is governed the Faulkner Act (formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law) under the Council-Manager system of municipal government (Plan E), implemented based on the recommendations of a Charter Study Commission as of January 1, 1983.[35] The residents of Eastampton adopted the Council-Manager form of New Jersey municipal government based on a referendum passed in 1982.[36] The Eastampton Township Council consists of five members elected at-large in partisan elections to staggered four-year terms of office, with either two or three seats coming up for election on a staggered basis in even years as part of the November general election. The Mayor and Deputy Mayor are selected by the Council from among its members at a reorganization meeting held each year during the first week of January. The Mayor coordinates the work of the Council, chairs Council meetings and is the township's public representative. The Mayor also signs all contracts and obligations of the Township and is empowered to perform marriages.[7][37]

As of 2015, members of the Eastampton Township Council are Mayor Anthony Zeno (D, term on council ends December 31, 2016; term as mayor ends 2015), Deputy Mayor Robert Apgar (D, term on council ends 2016; term as deputy mayor ends 2015), John Adams (R, 2018), Matthew Edson (R, 2018) and Jay Springer (D, 2016).[3][38][39][40][41][42]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Eastampton Township is located in the 3rd Congressional District[43] and is part of New Jersey's 8th state legislative district.[10][44][45]

New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Tom MacArthur (R, Toms River).[46] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[47] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[48][49]

For the 2004-15 Session, the 8th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Dawn Marie Addiego (R, Evesham Township) and in the General Assembly by Christopher J. Brown (R, Evesham Township) and Maria Rodriguez-Gregg (R, Evesham Township).[50] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[51] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[52]

Burlington County is governed by a Board of chosen freeholders, whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year.[53] The board chooses a director and deputy director from among its members at an annual reorganization meeting held in January.[53] As of 2015, Burlington County's Freeholders are Director Mary Ann O'Brien (R, Medford Township, 2017; Director of Administration and Human Services),[54] Deputy Director Bruce Garganio (R, Florence Township, 2017; Director of Public Works and Health),[55] Aimee Belgard (D, Edgewater Park Township, 2015; Director of Hospital, Medical Services and Education)[56] Joseph Donnelly (R, Cinnaminson Township, 2016; Director of Public Safety, Natural Resources, and Education)[57] and Joanne Schwartz (D, Southampton Township, 2015; Director of Health and Corrections).[58][53] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Tim Tyler,[59] Sheriff Jean E. Stanfield[60] and Surrogate George T. Kotch.[61]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 3,610 registered voters in Eastampton Township, of which 1,160 (32.1% vs. 33.3% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 772 (21.4% vs. 23.9%) were registered as Republicans and 1,678 (46.5% vs. 42.8%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[62] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 59.5% (vs. 61.7% in Burlington County) were registered to vote, including 78.8% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 80.3% countywide).[62][63]

n the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 1,651 votes (59.7% vs. 58.1% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 1,069 votes (38.6% vs. 40.2%) and other candidates with 29 votes (1.0% vs. 1.0%), among the 2,766 ballots cast by the township's 3,802 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.8% (vs. 74.5% in Burlington County).[64][65] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 1,754 votes (58.8% vs. 58.4% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 1,172 votes (39.3% vs. 39.9%) and other candidates with 36 votes (1.2% vs. 1.0%), among the 2,981 ballots cast by the township's 3,786 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.7% (vs. 80.0% in Burlington County).[66] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 1,442 votes (52.6% vs. 52.9% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 1,269 votes (46.3% vs. 46.0%) and other candidates with 15 votes (0.5% vs. 0.8%), among the 2,741 ballots cast by the township's 3,458 registered voters, for a turnout of 79.3% (vs. 78.8% in the whole county).[67]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 945 votes (58.4% vs. 61.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 637 votes (39.4% vs. 35.8%) and other candidates with 16 votes (1.0% vs. 1.2%), among the 1,617 ballots cast by the township's 3,796 registered voters, yielding a 42.6% turnout (vs. 44.5% in the county).[68][69] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 886 votes (48.2% vs. 47.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 818 votes (44.5% vs. 44.5%), Independent Chris Daggett with 99 votes (5.4% vs. 4.8%) and other candidates with 29 votes (1.6% vs. 1.2%), among the 1,840 ballots cast by the township's 3,760 registered voters, yielding a 48.9% turnout (vs. 44.9% in the county).[70]

Education[edit]

For Kindergarten through eighth grade, public school students are served by the Eastampton Township School District at Eastampton Community School. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's one school had an enrollment of 643 students and 54.3 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.84:1.[71]

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend the Rancocas Valley Regional High School, a regional public high school serving students from five communities encompassing approximately 40 square miles (100 km2) and composed of the communities of Eastampton Township, Hainesport Township, Lumberton Township, Mount Holly Township and Westampton Township.[72][73] As of the 2011-12 school year, the school had an enrollment of 2,007 students and 124.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 16.19:1.[74] The school is located in Mount Holly Township and is part of the Rancocas Valley Regional High School District.

Students from Eastampton Township, and from all of Burlington County, are eligible to attend the Burlington County Institute of Technology, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at its campuses in Medford and Westampton Township.[75]

Transportation[edit]

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 30.46 miles (49.02 km) of roadways, of which 19.95 miles (32.11 km) were maintained by the municipality, 9.43 miles (15.18 km) by Burlington County and 1.08 miles (1.74 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[76]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, are residents of, or are otherwise closely associated with Eastampton Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Township Council, Eastampton Township. Accessed June 27, 2015.
  4. ^ 2014 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, as of December 15, 2014. Accessed April 28, 2015. As of date accessed, Ricardo Rodriguez was listed as mayor with a term-end year of 2014.
  5. ^ Township Manager's Office, Eastampton Township. Accessed August 15, 2013.
  6. ^ Municipal Clerk, Eastampton Township. Accessed August 15, 2013.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 43.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Eastampton, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Eastampton township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 18, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 4. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Eastampton township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 18, 2012.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014 - 2014 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Eastampton, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed June 19, 2012.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Eastampton, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  16. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed June 19, 2012.
  18. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed June 19, 2012.
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 95. Accessed June 19, 2012.
  21. ^ Historic Smithville Park, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed November 25, 2013. "Smithville grew from a typical, small mill operation on the Rancocas Creek to a major industrial plant employing hundreds of workers in its shops and yards from the 1860s to the 1920s. Known for its high-quality woodworking machinery, the Smithville-Mt. Holly Bicycle Railroad, and the Star high-wheeled bicycle, Smithville was also well ahead of its time in town planning, sustainability, and workers' rights and welfare"
  22. ^ History, Smithville Mansion. Accessed April 28, 2015.
  23. ^ Areas touching Eastampton Township, MapIt. Accessed December 27, 2014.
  24. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed April 28, 2015.
  25. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  26. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Burlington County Municipalities, 1800 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  27. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 29, 2013.
  28. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed August 15, 2013.
  29. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed June 19, 2012.
  30. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed June 19, 2012. Listed as Upper Penns Neck Township.
  31. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  32. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Eastampton township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  33. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Eastampton township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  34. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Eastampton township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 19, 2012.
  35. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law", New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  36. ^ Ridgway, Jeanne. "Eastampton: Riding into history", Courier-Post, October 18, 2006. Accessed August 15, 2013. "1982: The residents of Eastampton adopt the council-manager form of government."
  37. ^ Council & Committees, Eastampton Township, New Jersey. Accessed April 28, 2015. Text appears to mirror the content of this Wikipedia article.
  38. ^ 2015 Municipal User Friendly Budget, Eastampton Township. Accessed June 27, 2015.
  39. ^ Staff. "Reorganization meetings span the county", Burlington County Times, January 3, 2013. Accessed August 15, 2013. "Eastampton: Incumbent Jay Springer and newcomers Robert Apgar and Anthony Zeno were sworn in to four-year terms on the Township Council. Rovenna Overton was named mayor and Ricardo Rodriguez was named deputy mayor."
  40. ^ Staff. "Eastampton: Voter Guide", Burlington County Times, November 1, 2012. Accessed August 15, 2013.
  41. ^ November 4, 2014 Summary Report Burlington County Official Recounted Results, Burlington County, New Jersey, December 22, 2014. Accessed April 28, 2015.
  42. ^ November 6, 2012 Summary Report Burlington County Amended Official Results, Burlington County, New Jersey, December 11, 2012. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  43. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  44. ^ 2014 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 57, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed May 22, 2015.
  45. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  46. ^ Tom MacArthur Biography, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  47. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  48. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  49. ^ Senators of the 114th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  50. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 23, 2014.
  51. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  52. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  53. ^ a b c Staff. Board of Chosen Freeholders, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  54. ^ Mary Ann O'Brien, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  55. ^ Bruce Garganio, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  56. ^ Aimee Belgard, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed August 4, 2014.
  57. ^ Joseph B. Donnelly, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  58. ^ Joanne Schwartz, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  59. ^ County Clerk, Burlington County. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  60. ^ Sheriff's Department, Burlington County. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  61. ^ Surrogate, Burlington County. Accessed May 12, 2015.
  62. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Burlington, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 25, 2014.
  63. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 25, 2014.
  64. ^ Presidential November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Burlington County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed December 25, 2014.
  65. ^ Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Burlington County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed December 25, 2014.
  66. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Burlington County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 25, 2014.
  67. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Burlington County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 25, 2014.
  68. ^ 2013 Governor: Burlington County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, January 29, 2014. Accessed December 25, 2014.
  69. ^ Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast November 5, 2013 General Election Results : Burlington County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, January 29, 2014. Accessed December 25, 2014.
  70. ^ 2009 Governor: Burlington County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 25, 2014.
  71. ^ District information for Eastampton Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 30, 2014.
  72. ^ History of the School, Rancocas Valley Regional High School. Accessed September 30, 2014. "The district encompasses approximately 40 square miles (100 km2) and comprises the townships of Eastampton, Hainesport, Lumberton, Mount Holly, and Westampton."
  73. ^ Esposito, Martha. "Regional School Districts", Burlington County Times, March 14, 2012. last updated January 20, 2014. Accessed September 30, 2014. "RANCOCAS VALLEY REGIONAL - Serves: Eastampton, Hainesport, Lumberton, Mount Holly, Westampton"
  74. ^ Data for Rancocas Valley Regional High School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 30, 2014.
  75. ^ Why Choose BCIT?, Burlington County Institute of Technology. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  76. ^ Burlington County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  77. ^ Remo, Jessica. "Spirits in the Night; Who ya gonna call? The South Jersey Ghost Research team answers when Garden State homeowners get spooked.", New Jersey Monthly, September 13, 2010. Accessed July 6, 2015. "Carroll, a 42-year-old antiques dealer, and seven other team members are casing the Smithville Mansion, a circa-1850 Federal manor in Eastampton, for the best places to set up motion sensors and other equipment.... Its most prominent owner was Hezekiah Bradley Smith, an inventor and congressman who bought the property in 1865 for its prime location between Philadelphia and New York."

External links[edit]